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MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

http://www.csail.mit.edu/

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The AI Revolution: Road to Superintelligence - Wait But Why PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.) Note: The reason this post took three weeks to finish is that as I dug into research on Artificial Intelligence, I could not believe what I was reading. It hit me pretty quickly that what’s happening in the world of AI is not just an important topic, but by far THE most important topic for our future. Futurist: We'll someday accept computers as human Futurist Ray Kurzweil spoke Monday at the South By Southwest Interactive conference. Ray Kurzweil, the acclaimed inventor and futurist, believes that humans and technology are merging Kurzweil on portentous sci-fi fears about computers: "I don't see it as them vs. us"He spoke to a crowd of more than 3,000 at the South by Southwest Interactive conference Austin, Texas (CNN) -- Any author or filmmaker seeking ideas for a sci-fi yarn about the implications of artificial intelligence -- good or bad -- would be smart to talk to Ray Kurzweil. Kurzweil, the acclaimed inventor and futurist, believes that humans and technology are blurring -- note the smartphone appendages in almost everyone's hand -- and will eventually merge.

Top notch AI system about as smart as a four-year-old, lacks commonsense Researchers have found that an AI system has an average IQ of a four-year-old child (Image: Shutterstock) Those who saw IBM’s Watson defeat former winners on Jeopardy! in 2011 might be forgiven for thinking that artificially intelligent computer systems are a lot brighter than they are. While Watson was able to cope with the highly stylized questions posed during the quiz, AI systems are still left wanting when it comes to commonsense. Neuro Evolving Robotic Operatives Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives, or NERO for short, is a unique computer game that lets you play with adapting intelligent agents hands-on. Evolve your own robot army by tuning their artificial brains for challenging tasks, then pit them against your friends' teams in online competitions! New features in NERO 2.0 include an interactive game mode called territory capture, as well as a new user interface and more extensive training tools. NERO is a result of an academic research project in artificial intelligence, based on the rtNEAT algorithm. It is also a platform for future research on intelligent agent technology. The NERO project is run by the Neural Networks Group of the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin .

Meet the man who has been at the forefront of AI innovation for three decades Geoffrey Hinton was in high school when a friend convinced him that the brain worked like a hologram. To create one of those 3D holographic images, you record how countless beams of light bounce off an object and then you store these little bits of information across a vast database. While still in high school, back in 1960s Britain, Hinton was fascinated by the idea that the brain stores memories in much the same way. Rather than keeping them in a single location, it spreads them across its enormous network of neurons. A Non-Mathematical Introduction to Using Neural Networks The goal of this article is to help you understand what a neural network is, and how it is used. Most people, even non-programmers, have heard of neural networks. There are many science fiction overtones associated with them. And like many things, sci-fi writers have created a vast, but somewhat inaccurate, public idea of what a neural network is. Most laypeople think of neural networks as a sort of artificial brain.

The Current State of Machine Intelligence (The 2016 Machine Intelligence landscape and post can be found here) I spent the last three months learning about every artificial intelligence, machine learning, or data related startup I could find — my current list has 2,529 of them to be exact. Yes, I should find better things to do with my evenings and weekends but until then… Why do this? A few years ago, investors and startups were chasing “big data” (I helped put together a landscape on that industry).

OVERVIEW OF NEURAL NETWORKS This installment addresses the subject of computer-models of neural networks and the relevance of those models to the functioning brain. The computer field of Artificial Intelligence is a vast bottomless pit which would lead this series too far from biological reality -- and too far into speculation -- to be included. Neural network theory will be the singular exception because the model is so persuasive and so important that it cannot be ignored. Neurobiology provides a great deal of information about the physiology of individual neurons as well as about the function of nuclei and other gross neuroanatomical structures. But understanding the behavior of networks of neurons is exceedingly challenging for neurophysiology, given current methods. Nonetheless, network behavior is important, especially in light of evidence for so-called "emergent properties", ie, properties of networks that are not obvious from an understanding of neuron physiology.

AI Catches Psychosis Before It Happens Automated speech analysis predicts psychotic episodes with 100% accuracy. AI can tell if a patient is approaching a psychotic episode through analyzing what the individual says, potentially better than humans can. Automation offers great standardization to a medical field where thoughts and state of mind have to be intuited through speech.

Intelligent Machines: The truth behind AI fiction Image copyright Thinkstock Artificial intelligence (AI) is the science of making smart machines, and it has come a long way since the term was coined in the 1950s. Nowadays, robots work alongside humans in hotels and factories, while driverless cars are being test driven on the roads. Behind the scenes, AI engines in the form of smart algorithms "work" on stock exchanges, offer up suggestions for books and films on Amazon and Netflix and even write the odd article.

uk.businessinsider Shutterstock The world is going to be a very different place in 2045. Predicting the future is fraught with challenges, but when it comes to technological advances and forward thinking, experts working at the Pentagon's research agency may be the best people to ask. Launched in 1958, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is behind some of the biggest innovations in the military — many of which have crossed over to the civilian technology market. These include things like advanced robotics, global positioning systems, and the Internet. So what's going to happen in 2045? Synthetic intelligence Synthetic intelligence (SI) is an alternative term for artificial intelligence which emphasizes that the intelligence of machines need not be an imitation or any way artificial; it can be a genuine form of intelligence.[1] John Haugeland proposes an analogy with simulated diamonds and synthetic diamonds—only the synthetic diamond is truly a diamond.[1] Synthetic means that which is produced by synthesis; combining parts to form a whole, colloquially, a man-made version of that which has arisen naturally. As defined, a "synthetic intelligence" would therefore be man-made, but not a simulation. The term was used by Haugeland in 1986 to describe artificial intelligence research up to that point,[1] which he called "good old fashioned artificial intelligence" or "GOFAI". Sources disagree about exactly what constitutes "real" intelligence as opposed to "simulated" intelligence and therefore whether there is a meaningful distinction between artificial intelligence and synthetic intelligence.

A Robot With A Simple Form of Consciousness Synopsis A year ago, researchers endowed the walking robot Hector with a simple form of consciousness. Their new research goes a step further and enables Hector to see himself as others see him. Summary Scientists have developed a prototype for self-replicating robots Robotics researchers have constructed small cubes that with no exterior moving parts are able to propel themselves forward, climb and jump on top of each other and snap together to form arbitrary shapes. The cubes could even move while suspended upside down from metallic surfaces. The idea first came about in 2011 when a research student at MIT called John Romanishin proposed a new design for modular robots to his robotics professor, Daniela Rus. At first Rus was unsure of the design; however two years later Rus showed a fellow robotics researcher at Cornell University, a video of prototype robots, based on Romanishin’s design, in action.

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