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History - British History in depth: Ages of English Timeline

History - British History in depth: Ages of English Timeline
British Broadcasting Corporation Home Accessibility links This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving. History Ages of English Timeline « Back to British History in-depth BBC iD Sign in BBC navigation BBC links BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/timelines/language_timeline/index_embed.shtml

Related:  Timeline tools and resources.The Evolution of the English Languagevanricher

Language Timeline The English language is a vast flea market of words, handed down, borrowed or created over more than 2000 years. And it is still expanding, changing and trading. Our language is not purely English at all - it is a ragbag of diverse words that have come to our island from all around the world. Words enter the language in all sorts of ways: with invaders, migrants, tradesmen; in stories, artworks, technologies and scientific concepts; with those who hold power, and those who try to overthrow the powerful. View the chart below to get an overview of some of the many chapters in the history of the English language.

Old English Translator - Old English Grammar When reading the comments people make about this site probably the most common is that some users have no understanding of Old English Grammar and the most common question is, for nouns, what does Nominative, Accusative, Genitive and Dative mean? The following is an attempt to explain in simple terms what these words mean. There are many books written on this subject and they provide a much greater depth of accuracy and understanding than I can here. Having said that, here goes: Nouns are things - like King, sword and horse.

List of timelines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of timelines currently on Wikipedia. §Types[edit] §General timelines[edit] §History[edit] History of English The figure below shows the timeline of the history of the English language. The earliest known residents of the British Isles were the Celts, who spoke Celtic languages—a separate branch of the Indo-European language family tree. Over the centuries the British Isles were invaded and conquered by various peoples, who brought their languages and customs with them as they settled in their new lives.

Helping language learners become language researchers: wordandphrase.info (part 1) What is wordandphrase.info? Wordandphrase.info is a brilliant website. Essentially, it is a user-friendly interface for analysing a corpus. (For those of you who haven’t come across this term as yet, a corpus is a collection of texts stored electronically.) Civil Rights Movement Timeline (14th Amendment, 1964 Act, Human Rights Law) Jan. 23 The 24th Amendment abolishes the poll tax, which originally had been instituted in 11 southern states after Reconstruction to make it difficult for poor blacks to vote. Summer

Etymology: Languages that have contributed to English vocabulary over time. In Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English, I examine how words borrowed from different languages have influenced English throughout its history. The above feature summarizes some of the main data from the book, focusing on the 14 sources that have given the most words to English, as reflected by the new and revised entries in the Oxford English Dictionary. Using the date buttons at the top of the graphic, you can compare the impact that different languages have made on English over time. In the "per period" view, you can see the proportions of words coming into English from each source in 50-year slices from 1150 up to the present day. Compare, for instance, how the input from German has grown and then declined again from 1800 to the present day. (The earliest period, pre-1150, is much longer than 50 years, because more precise dating of words from this early stage in the history of English is very problematic.)

John McWhorter Linguist John McWhorter thinks about language in relation to race, politics and our shared cultural history. Why you should listen John McWhorter is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, teaching linguistics, Western Civilization and music history. He is a regular columnist on language matters and race issues for Time and CNN, writes for the Wall Street Journal "Taste" page, and writes a regular column on language for The Atlantic.

Geologic time scale Online exhibits Geologic time scale Take a journey back through the history of the Earth — jump to a specific time period using the time scale below and examine ancient life, climates, and geography. You might wish to start in the Cenozoic Era (65.5 million years ago to the present) and work back through time, or start with Hadean time (4.6 to 4 billion years ago)* and journey forward to the present day — it's your choice. [Note: "mya" means "millions of years ago"] Ways to begin your exploration: Do you speak Uglish? How English has evolved in Uganda Please don’t dirten my shirt with your muddy hands. Stop cowardising and go and see that girl. Don’t just beep her again, bench her. Typos? No, we’re speaking Uglish (pronounced you-glish), a Ugandan form of English influenced by Luganda and other local dialects, which has produced hundreds of words with their own unique meanings.

Lessons - Copperplate/Engrossers Script Lessons in Calligraphy and Penmanship Copperplate/Engrossers Script Welcome to the IAMPETH Lessons pages. Here you will find a wealth of material for learning calligraphy and penmanship. Cursive handwriting, Ornamental Penmanship, Copperplate, Spencerian script - we have lessons on these and much more. If you find these materials useful, and would like to support the organization that makes this site possible, please consider joining IAMPETH or making a donation. Documents marked with an * are Adobe PDF documents (download free Adobe Reader)

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