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Exploring Life's Origins: A Virtual Exhibit

Exploring Life's Origins: A Virtual Exhibit

http://exploringorigins.org/index.html

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Top 14 Presentation Apps - Showing 1 to 14 based on popularity 1 to 16 based on popularity Presentation applications give users the tools needed to organize information to be shared with an online or offline audience as slideshows, videos or photo montages. AppAppeal ranks all presentation apps based on worldwide popularity. Popularity rank 119 AppAppeal rating 4/5 Price range (p/month): $19.00 - $249.00

Evolution: Second Edition Home This website is a companion to the textbook Evolution, Second Edition, by Douglas J. Futuyma, published by Sinauer Associates. The site is designed to help you review and master key concepts, facts, and terminology from the textbook through interactive exercises and learning tools. To get started, select a chapter and a category from the pull-down menus above and click Go, or click a category in the list on the left to access any of the resources. System Requirements

Top 10 Signs Of Evolution In Modern Man Humans Through history, as natural selection played its part in the development of modern man, many of the useful functions and parts of the human body become unnecessary. What is most fascinating is that many of these parts of the body still remain in some form so we can see the progress of evolution. This list covers the ten most significant evolutionary changes that have taken place – leaving signs behind them. Goose Bumps Scientists discover brain chemical that eases the pain of financial loss By Daily Mail Reporters Updated: 02:12 GMT, 22 February 2012 Scientists have found that a chemical in the brain allows people to brush off the pain of financial losses. The breakthrough discovery could pave the way to the development of drugs to treat problem gamblers. The chemical is active in the region of the brain involved in sensory and reward systems and its existence sheds light on what may have been going on in the brains of Wall Street and City of London traders as the 2008 financial crisis took hold. Addiction: The chemical could pave the way to the development of drugs to treat problem gamblers

Evolution Resources from the National Academies In the News: Your Inner Fish – A Scientific Adventure Have you ever wondered why people look the way they do? Why our hands and feet have five digits instead of six? The brain is actually wired like a chess board and a new scanner reveals how in stunning detail By Ted Thornhill Published: 10:04 GMT, 30 March 2012 | Updated: 15:31 GMT, 30 March 2012 For a long time it was thought that the brain was a mass of tangled wires, but researchers recently found that its fibers are actually set up like a chess board, crossing at right-angles. What’s more, this grid structure has now been revealed in amazing detail as part of a brain imaging study by a new state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Van Wedeen, of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), who led study, said: ‘Far from being just a tangle of wires, the brain's connections turn out to be more like ribbon cables - folding 2D sheets of parallel neuronal fibers that cross paths at right angles, like the warp and weft of a fabric.

Evolution of Evolution - 150 Years of Darwin's "On the Origin of Species" Text-only | Flash Special Report Evolution of Evolution - 150 Years of Darwin's "On the Origin of Species" Introduction Charles Darwin Essays Darwin as Ichthyologist: Lessons for Our Future — Daniel Pauly Rethinking the Birdtree of Life — Shannon Hackett & Sushma Reddy What If Darwin Hadn't Written "On the Origin of Species?" — Marsha Richmond The Mythology of Natural Selection — Jim Secord Audio Transcripts Interview with Daniel Pauly Interview with Shannon Hackett & Sushma Reddy Video Transcripts Interview with Marsha Richmond Interview with Jim Secord

Dolan DNA Learning Center Animations can be viewed within your web browser or downloaded for play from your computer. In some genes the protein-coding sections of the DNA ("exons") are interrupted by non-coding regions ("introns"). RNA splicing removes the introns from pre mRNA to produce the final set of instructions for the protein. Transcript: As DNA is transcribed into RNA it needs to be edited to remove non-coding regions, or introns, shown in green. This editing process is called splicing, which involves removing the introns, leaving only the yellow, protein-coding regions, called exons. The Simulation News and Announcements The Human Brain Project to present at Swisstech Open Days Representatives of the Human Brain Project (HBP) will be presenting at the grand opening of the Swiss Tech Convention Center, at EPFL in Lausanne on the weekend of 5-6 April 2014. The presentation will consist of a global overview of the project, followed by a projection of the 3D HBP movie and a 10-minute Q&A session. This event will be open to the public.

Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior Syllabus Professor Stephen C. Stearns, Edward P. Bass Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Description The Human Brain Project Blue Brain’s success in modeling the rat cortical column has driven the development of the Brain Simulation Facility and has demonstrated the feasibility of the project’s general strategy. But, this is only a first step. The human brain is an immensely powerful, energy efficient, self-learning, self-repairing computer.

PCR primer design: primers4clades tutorial Welcome to the primers4clades (primers for clades) documentation and tutorial page. This document explains how to use this tool and, more importantly, how to read the results. For a quick start try the tutorials, which are based on the provided demo sequences.

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