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Natural Selection - Natural Selection, Evolution, Mutation

Natural Selection - Natural Selection, Evolution, Mutation
Related:  Natural Selection and Adaptation

Origins: Series Overview Origins: Back to the Beginning September 29, 2004 NEIL deGRASSE TYSON (Astrophysicist): A hellish, fiery wasteland, a molten planet hostile to life, yet somehow, amazingly, this is where we got our start. How? How did the universe, our planet, how did we ourselves come to be? How did the first sparks of life take hold here? Right now, we're all eavesdropping on the birth pangs of the cosmos. DAVID SPERGEL (Princeton University): ...how big it is, how old it is, what's it made of, and what were the processes that made galaxies, that made us. NEIL deGRASSE TYSON: So a furious race is on to solve the ultimate mystery. ANTHONY READHEAD (California Institute of Technology): The spirit of competition is one of the things, of course, that drives scientists. Keep our fingers crossed. NEIL deGRASSE TYSON: And as our new vision of the universe emerges, strange ideas reveal themselves. STAN WOOSLEY (University of California, Santa Cruz): Stars are the ultimate alchemist. Hello. ARNO PENZIAS: Oh, yeah.

Rediscovering Biology - Case Studies: The Genetics of Resistance to HIV Infection This case uses the example of HIV, to explore the relationships between viruses, cells and the immune system, and the role of genes in disease resistance. An animation explains PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and electrophoresis and their practical use as a genetic test. We will see how mutations in an HIV receptor confer relative reslstance to infection. We will find out how often this mutation occurs in the general population, and see data about additional mechanisms of HIV resistance. Before beginning this case study, you may want to review these related materials: • HIV and AIDS Video • HIV and AIDS Online Text • Human Evolution Online Text • Genomics Video • Genomics Online Text

Short Films “Film is a powerful way to tell stories. … The right story, told well, can be engaging, informative, and memorable.” —Sean B. Carroll HHMI’s series of short films for the classroom brings fascinating stories of science and scientists to students and teachers. These compelling stories, in fields ranging from evolutionary biology and genetics to earth science, feature leading scientists and stunning locations around the world. Importantly, each film is accompanied by a collection of supporting materials, including film guides, quizzes, hands-on activities, and lesson plans, that teachers use to increase the impact of the films in their instruction. The films and accompanying resources are available for download at BioInteractive.org.

Extraordinary Adaptation Cut and Run Legions of athletes, sports gurus, and scientists have tried to figure out why Kenyans dominate long-distance running. In this short, we stumble across a surprising, and sort of terrifying, explanation. At the 1968 summer Olympics in Mexico City, Kipchoge Keino overcame a gall bladder infection to win gold in the 1500 meter race. Since then, one particular group of Kenyans - the Kalenjin - has produced an astonishing number of great long-distance runners. David Epstein and John Manners help Greg untangle a web of potential factors - from something in the cornmeal to simple economics.

Evolution in an RNA world. [Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. 2009] - PubMed result 100 Years of Breed “Improvement” | Science of Dogs For the sake of honest disclosure, I will admit to owning “purebreds” (the ‘pureness’ of purebreeds is a discussion for another time) but I also have mutts. All the dogs I’ve had since childhood had a few things in common, they were friendly, prey driven, ball-crazy, intense, motivated, athletic (crazy dogs are easier to train) and none had intentionally bred defects. I would never buy/adopt a dog whose breed characteristics exacted a health burden. The dogs on the left are from the 1915 book, ‘Breeds of All Nations‘ by W.E. It seems incredible that at one time the Bull Terrier was a handsome, athletic dog. The Basset Hound has gotten lower, has suffered changes to its rear leg structure, has excessive skin, vertebra problems, droopy eyes prone to entropion and ectropion and excessively large ears. A shorter face means a host of problems. The Dachshund used to have functional legs and necks that made sense for their size. Once a noble working dog, the modern St. Further Reading Like this:

The driving force for molecular evolution of translation

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