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History - British History in depth: Ages of English Timeline

History - British History in depth: Ages of English Timeline
Related:  The Evolution of the English Language

Language Timeline The English language is a vast flea market of words, handed down, borrowed or created over more than 2000 years. And it is still expanding, changing and trading. Our language is not purely English at all - it is a ragbag of diverse words that have come to our island from all around the world. Words enter the language in all sorts of ways: with invaders, migrants, tradesmen; in stories, artworks, technologies and scientific concepts; with those who hold power, and those who try to overthrow the powerful. View the chart below to get an overview of some of the many chapters in the history of the English language. Celts 500BC-43BC Romans 43BC-c.450AD Anglo Saxons 449AD St Augustine 597 AD Vikings 789AD Normans 1066 100 Years War 1337-1450s Renaissance 1476-1650 1700s Industrial Revolution 1760-1800s 1900s - Present Day References: The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language by David Crystal Words in Time by Geoffrey Hughes

Funny poetry for children Etymology: Languages that have contributed to English vocabulary over time. In Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English, I examine how words borrowed from different languages have influenced English throughout its history. The above feature summarizes some of the main data from the book, focusing on the 14 sources that have given the most words to English, as reflected by the new and revised entries in the Oxford English Dictionary. Using the date buttons at the top of the graphic, you can compare the impact that different languages have made on English over time. In the "per period" view, you can see the proportions of words coming into English from each source in 50-year slices from 1150 up to the present day. Compare, for instance, how the input from German has grown and then declined again from 1800 to the present day. (The earliest period, pre-1150, is much longer than 50 years, because more precise dating of words from this early stage in the history of English is very problematic.) A version of this post appeared on Oxford Dictionaries.

Mrs. Jones - Free Sing Along Songs We sing several songs to familiar tunes as part of our daily routine. Singing is a favorite part of our day! We like to stand up so we can freely make movements or clap while we sing. When we sing and make the sound of the letter we are studying, we have fun thinking of words we can include to make new verses and how we are going to "act out" or "make motions with our hands or bodies" to "visually explain" key words. We love it when our first or last name is in the song and everyone points to us! We like the rhythm of the letters when we practice spelling the "word of the week" and the word wall words by singing the letters. 15 Fabulous Fingerplays and Facts From the website: "Finger plays have been used in early childhood classrooms for many years- however, they seem to have taken a backseat recently to more “academic” skills. Here are some of the songs we sing together for each alphabet letter. Alphabet Letter Sing Along Songs Aa - Hurray For Aa! Check out the songs by Mr. Dr. Mr.

History of English The figure below shows the timeline of the history of the English language. The earliest known residents of the British Isles were the Celts, who spoke Celtic languages—a separate branch of the Indo-European language family tree. Over the centuries the British Isles were invaded and conquered by various peoples, who brought their languages and customs with them as they settled in their new lives. In case you hadn’t made the connection, “England” ← “Engla Land” ← “Angle Land” (Land of the Angles, a people of northern old Germany). Here are some links for further reading on the history of English, in no particular order: If you need any more references, try a Yahoo! Copyright © 2003–2007 Daniel M.

- Maggie's Earth Adventures Do you speak Uglish? How English has evolved in Uganda Please don’t dirten my shirt with your muddy hands. Stop cowardising and go and see that girl. Don’t just beep her again, bench her. Typos? No, we’re speaking Uglish (pronounced you-glish), a Ugandan form of English influenced by Luganda and other local dialects, which has produced hundreds of words with their own unique meanings. Some will be immediately obvious to English speakers: dirten, meaning to make dirty; cowardising, to behave like a coward. Others offer small insights into youth culture: beep – meaning to ring someone but to hang up quickly before the person answers. Now, Bernard Sabiti, a Ugandan cultural commentator has recorded these colloquialisms in a new book which attempts to unlock what he calls “one of the funniest and strangest English varieties in the world”. Working as a consultant for international NGOs, Sabiti kept being asked “what kind of English do Ugandans speak?” The result? He also credits local musicians for introducing a number of words into the lexicon.

ALL the touch-typing tutors! Freeware, shareware, online, direct links to download. Amusing, yet multifunctional touch-typing tutor with support for several layouts: QWERTY (US, UK, ...), Dvorak, AZERTY etc. ONLY in Stamina besides the traditional finger positioning on the keyboard are you offered an ALTERNATIVE method (to reduce hand stress)! After having gone through the fire, water and the course, you will be able to swiftly type away long emails (spam), efficiently misbehave in chat rooms, ICQ and so on without ever looking at the keyboard. The benefits are obvious! Intimate details: work with lessons and text (5 modes), a lesson editor, statistics, progress graphs, virtual keyboard (can be hidden), super MP3 sounds and music, a playlist, support for several users, user-friendly thought out interface, detailed help with a logic game, + a small elephant pile of pleasant tidbits. Are you writing memoirs, but feel you might run out of time? Home | Download 1.3 Mb

25 maps that explain the English language English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange, including conquest and colonization, from the Vikings through the 21st century. The origins of English Where English comes fromEnglish, like more than 400 other languages, is part of the Indo-European language family, sharing common roots not just with German and French but with Russian, Hindi, Punjabi, and Persian. The spread of English The colonization of AmericaThe British settlers coming to different parts of America in the 17th and 18th centuries were from different regional, class, and religious backgrounds, and brought with them distinctive ways of speaking. English around the world Countries with English as the official languageFifty-eight countries have English as an official language. Dialects and regionalisms

Daily Grammar Archive - Comprehensive archive of all of our grammar lessons and quizzes This archive contains links to all of our free grammar lessons and quizzes. You can use this archive to study Daily Grammar at your own pace. Lessons 1-90 cover the eight parts of speech, which are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. Lessons 91-300 cover the parts of the sentence, such as appositives, predicate nominatives, direct objects, prepositional phrases, clauses, and verbals. Lessons 301-440 cover the mechanics of grammar, which is also known as capitalization and punctuation. Our lessons have been organized by lesson number and by subject. Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 - Quiz Lessons 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 - Quiz Lessons 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 - Quiz Lessons 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Quiz Lessons 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 - Quiz Lessons 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 - Quiz Lessons 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 - Quiz Lessons 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 - Quiz Lessons 56, 57, 58, 59, 60 - Quiz Lessons 61, 62, 63, 64, 65 - Quiz Lessons 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 - Quiz

The Evolution of English The Evolution of English George Boeree The English language begins with the Anglo-Saxons. The Romans, who had controlled England for centuries, had withdrawn their troops and most of their colonists by the early 400s. Attacks from the Irish, the Picts from Scotland, the native Britons, and Anglo-Saxons from across the North Sea, plus the deteriorating situation in the rest of the Empire, made the retreat a strategic necessity. As the Romans withdrew, the Britons re-established themselves in the western parts of England, and the Anglo-Saxons invaded and began to settle the eastern parts in the middle 400s. The Britons are the ancestors of the modern day Welsh, as well as the people of Britanny across the English channel. The language we now call English is actually a blend of many languages. Later, in the 800s, the Northmen (Vikings) came to England, mostly from Denmark, and settled in with the Anglo-Saxons from Yorkshire to Norfolk, an area that became known as the Danelaw. Hwæt!

Literature: Literature Library Glencoe Literature offers a collection of hardcover books that allows you to extend the study of literature to your choice of full-length novels and plays. Each Glencoe Literature Library book consists of a complete novel or play accompanied by several related readings, such as short stories, poems, essays, or informational articles. To order one or more Glencoe Literature Library book, please contact our customer service department at customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com, or by calling 1-800-334-7344 (between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Click on a Glencoe Literature Library title below for a brief description of the novel or play, a list of its related readings, and a link to its individual study guide. Across Five Aprils Irene Hunt The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Mark Twain All Quiet on the Western Front Erich Maria Remarque . . . Animal Farm George Orwell The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin Top Bearstone Will Hobbs The Friends Rosa Guy

The History of English - How New Words Are Created The drift of word meanings over time often arises, often but not always due to catachresis (the misuse, either deliberate or accidental, of words). By some estimates, over half of all words adopted into English from Latin have changed their meaning in some way over time, often drastically. For example, smart originally meant sharp, cutting or painful; handsome merely meant easily-handled (and was generally derogatory); bully originally meant darling or sweetheart; sad meant full, satiated or satisfied; and insult meant to boast, brag or triumph in an insolent way. A more modern example is the changing meaning of gay from merry to homosexual (and, in some circles in more recent years, to stupid or bad). Some words have changed their meanings many times. Some words have become much more specific than their original meanings. Some words came to mean almost the complete opposite of their original meanings.

Parent & Afterschool Resources Home › Parent & Afterschool Resources Looking for engaging ways to introduce your child to reading or to encourage your teen to write? Need some age-appropriate book suggestions or rainy day activities? The materials here are your answer—all of them created by experts to be fun, educational, and easy to use outside of school. Parent & Afterschool Resources by Grades Activities & Projects

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