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Pythagorean cup - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pythagorean cup - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cross section Cross section of a Pythagorean cup. A Pythagorean cup (also known as a Pythagoras cup, a Greedy Cup or a Tantalus cup) is a form of drinking cup that forces its user to imbibe only in moderation. Form and function[edit] A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it – giving it a shape like a Bundt pan in the center of the cup. When the cup is filled, liquid rises through the second pipe up to the chamber at the top of the central column, following Pascal's principle of communicating vessels. Common occurrences[edit] A Pythagorean cup sold in Crete A Pythagorean cup sold in Samos Hero of Alexandria (c. 10–70 AD) used Pythagorean cups as hydraulic components in his robotic systems. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Pythagorean cup demonstration video Related:  Ancient Civilisations

Musicovery 10 More Mysterious Conspiracy Theories Mysteries To date we have around seven conspiracy theory lists or lists containing entries related to such. This new list is a welcome addition as it has been some time since our last one and they are always extremely fascinating topics to read about. The world is full of conspiracy theories – many of which contain elements of mystery. This will definitely not be the last list of this type. Theories surrounding the Ararat Anomaly arose from a single black and white photograph taken in 1949 by a USAF recon plane performing routine intelligence gathering of the Ararat massif, which was in an area of military interest at the time. Conspiracy theorists, many of them Biblical literalists, claim that the odd-looking object if Noah’s Ark, which the Bible states “came to rest on the mountains of Ararat” after the Great Flood. The anomaly appears to be a very rounded elongation teetering on the edge of a slope, buried under ice and snow, and it has so roused the curiosity of the U.

"The Night Land: William Hope Hodgson in his own words" This account is from the pen of a UK fan, Steve Sneyd Back in 1988/9 , having read - I now forget where - not only that William Hope Hodgson had lived for some time in Blackburn, Lancashire, but, of particular interest, that his idea for the mysterious dwelling of `The House on the Borderland' may well have been influenced by his Blackburn home, I made attempts to find out where that home had been. The Borough of Blackburn Community & Leisure Services Department had "nothing on file for Hope Hodgson" and did "not have the book" - their Lyndsey MacDonald, indeed, suggested that I might have the wrong Blackburn, there being at least four others. But J B Darbyshire FLA, District Librarian of Lancashire County Council's District Central Library, and subsequently a Mr Sutton of the same library, proved to have the answers in terms of not one, but two, exact addresses, between them covering Hodgson's five years in Blackburn. I had good intentions to pay a pilgrimage as soon as possible.

Lady of Maali, New Guinea Musical Minds | Watch the Program Musical Minds PBS Airdate: June 30, 2009 NARRATOR: Some people have it, and others just don't... OLIVER SACKS (Author, Neurologist): This has been argued for two and a half centuries and will probably continue to be argued. NARRATOR: ...music on the brain. DEREK PARAVICINI (Pianist): In C. ALAN YENTOB: Some people have got it, and some people haven't got it. DEREK PARAVICINI: Yes. NARRATOR: Four amazing cases take us on a journey to find an answer. ALAN YENTOB: Derek is blind and autistic. DEREK PARAVICINI: Alan, I'm Derek. Very well, thank you. ALAN YENTOB: He can barely count past 10, but he can process music at lightning speed. DEREK PARAVICINI: Yeah. ALAN YENTOB: Matt has Tourette syndrome. MATT GIORDANO (Drummer): It's almost like my brain was a puzzle, right, and some of the pieces were not in place, and, all of a sudden, everything just kind of clicked. ALAN YENTOB: Tony is an orthopedic surgeon who had no formal musical training. Finding an answer is the obsession of Dr. Very nice, too.

40 websites that will make you cleverer right now The indexed web contains an incredible 14 billion pages. But only a tiny fraction help you improve your brain power. Here are 40 of the best. whizzpast.com – Learn about our awe inspiring past all in one wonderful place. khanacademy.org – Watch thousands of micro-lectures on topics ranging from history and medicine to chemistry and computer science. freerice.com – Help end world hunger by correctly answering multiple-choice quizzes on a wide variety of subjects. artofmanliness.com – Blog/site dedicated to all things manly, great for learning life skills and good insights. unplugthetv.com – Randomly selects an educational video for you to watch. coursera.org – An educational site that works with universities to get their courses on the Internet, free for you to use. mentalfloss.com – Interesting articles guaranteed to make you smile and get you thinking. feelgoodwardrobe.com – Find out how the world of fashion really works and what you can do to combat it. lifehacker.com – Learn to hack life!

Hypogeum of Hal Saflieni, Malta Myth, Legend, Folklore, Ghosts Apollo and the Greek Muses Updated July 2010 COMPREHENSIVE SITES ON MYTHOLOGY ***** The Encyclopedia Mythica - SEARCH - Areas - Image Gallery - Genealogy tables - Mythic Heroes Probert Encyclopaedia - Mythology Gods, Heroes, and MythDictionary of Mythology What is Myth? MESOPOTAMIAN MYTHOLOGYThe Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology Sumerian Gods and Goddesses Sumerian Myths SUMERIAN RELIGION Mythology's Mythinglinks: the Tigris-Euphrates Region of the Ancient Near East Gods, Goddesses, Demons and Monsters of Mesopotamia The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ More info on Ancient Mesopotamia can be found on my Ancient River Valley Civilizations page. GREEK MYTHOLOGYOrigins of Greek MythologyGreek Mythology - MythWeb Greek-Gods.info (plus a fun QUIZ)Ancient Greek Religion Family Tree of Greek Mythology Greek Names vs. VARIOUS FAIRIES, ELVES, UNICORNS, MERMAIDS, & OTHER MYTHICAL TOPICS HERE BE DRAGONS!

Stegosaurus Figure, Angkor Wat, Cambodia Tetrapharmakos The Tetrapharmakos (τετραφάρμακος) "four-part remedy" is a summary of the first four of the Κύριαι Δόξαι (Kuriai Doxai, the forty Epicurean Principal Doctrines given by Diogenes Laertius in his Life of Epicurus) in Epicureanism, a recipe for leading the happiest possible life. They are recommendations to avoid anxiety or existential dread.[1] The four-part cure[edit] As expressed by Philodemos, and preserved in a Herculaneum Papyrus (1005, 4.9–14), the tetrapharmakos reads:[4] This is a summary of the first four of the forty Epicurean Principal Doctrines (Sovran Maxims) given by Diogenes Laertius, which in the translation by Robert Drew Hicks (1925) read as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. Don't fear god[edit] In Hellenistic religion, the gods were conceived as hypothetical beings in a perpetual state of bliss, indestructible entities that are completely invulnerable. Don't worry about death[edit] As D. What is good is easy to get[edit] What is terrible is easy to endure[edit] References and notes[edit]

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

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