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Enki

Enki
A large number of myths about Enki have been collected from many sites, stretching from Southern Iraq to the Levantine coast. He figures in the earliest extant cuneiform inscriptions throughout the region and was prominent from the third millennium down to Hellenistic times. Attributes[edit] Myths of Enki[edit] Enki and Ninhursag and the Creation of Life and Sickness[edit] The cosmogenic myth common in Sumer was that of the hieros gamos, a sacred marriage where divine principles in the form of dualistic opposites came together as male and female to give birth to the cosmos. "The land of Dilmun is a pure place, the land of Dilmun is a clean place, The land of Dilmun is a clean place, the land of Dilmun is a bright place; He who is alone laid himself down in Dilmun, The place, after Enki is clean, that place is bright" "Her City Drinks the Water of Abundance, Dilmun Drinks the Water of Abundance, Her wells of bitter water, behold they are become wells of good water, Enki and the Making of Man[edit]

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THE VIKINGS THE VIKINGS:Combat equipment and fighting techniques Throughout the Dark Ages, war was a fact of life in many areas. From the opportunistic raids of Vikings to the massed battles of the C10th, most areas experienced the fear of imminent violence, and saw their men march off to fight and die. So, how exactly did they fight? On the whole, details of the battles and combat of the period are sketchy at best, although some detailed descriptions of individual fights are recorded in the Icelandic sagas. It is mainly from grave finds of the early period, and carved stones and legal texts from the later periods that we draw our knowledge of the combat of the Viking Age.

Enlil Enlil with his wife, Ninlil Origins[edit] Enlil was known as the inventor of the mattock (a key agricultural pick, hoe, ax or digging tool of the Sumerians) and helped plants to grow.[5] Cosmological role[edit] Enlil, along with Anu/An, Enki and Ninhursag were gods of the Sumerians.[6] Dagon A conjectured colored engraving of Dagon, the "fish-god." His name appears in Hebrew as דגון (in modern transcription Dagon, Tiberian Hebrew Dāḡôn), in Ugaritic as dgn (probably vocalized as Dagnu), and in Akkadian as Dagana, Daguna usually rendered in English translations as Dagan. Etymology[edit] In Ugaritic, the root dgn also means grain: in Hebrew דגן dāgān, Samaritan dīgan, is an archaic word for grain. The Phoenician author Sanchuniathon also says Dagon means siton, that being the Greek word for grain. Sanchuniathon further explains: "And Dagon, after he discovered grain and the plough, was called Zeus Arotrios."

New timeline for origin of ancient Egypt 3 September 2013Last updated at 20:51 ET By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC World Service Archaeological digs in Egypt reveal where the First Dynasty kings of Egypt are buried - but until now a timeline has been difficult to establish A new timeline for the origin of ancient Egypt has been established by scientists. Anu In Sumerian mythology, Anu (also An; from Sumerian *An 𒀭 = sky, heaven) was a sky-god, the god of heaven, lord of constellations, king of gods, spirits and demons, and dwelt in the highest heavenly regions. It was believed that he had the power to judge those who had committed crimes, and that he had created the stars as soldiers to destroy the wicked. His attribute was the royal tiara. His attendant and minister of state was the god Ilabrat.

Atargatis Atargatis /əˈtɑrɡətɨs/ or Ataratheh (/əˈtærəθə/; Aramaic: ‘Atar‘atheh or Tar‘atheh‎) was a Syrian deity, the chief goddess of northern Syria[1] (Michael Rostovtzeff called her "the great mistress of the North Syrian lands"),[2] Ctesias also used the name Derceto for her.[3] and to the Romans as Dea Syriae ("Syrian goddess"). Primarily she was a goddess of fertility, but, as the baalat ("mistress") of her city and people, she was also responsible for their protection and well-being. Her chief sanctuary was at Hierapolis, modern Manbij,[4] northeast of Aleppo, Syria. Roman skulls washed down lost London river 1 October 2013Last updated at 21:36 ET By Melissa Hogenboom Science reporter, BBC News About 20 Roman skulls were dug up from an old river bed near Liverpool Street station in London Archaeologists working with London's Crossrail project have uncovered 20 skulls believed to be from the Roman period.

Inanna Inanna (/ɪˈnænə/ or /ɪˈnɑːnə/; Cuneiform: 𒀭𒈹 DMUŠ3; Sumerian: Inanna; Akkadian: Ištar; Unicode: U+12239) is the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility, and warfare, and goddess of the E-Anna temple at the city of Uruk, her main centre. Part of the front of Inanna's temple from Uruk Origins[edit] Etymology[edit] Inanna's name derives from Lady of Heaven (Sumerian: nin-an-ak). Glaucus Glaucus and Scylla Glaucus (Γλαῦκος, gen: Γλαύκου) was a Greek prophetic sea-god, born mortal and turned immortal upon eating a magical herb. It was believed that he commonly came to the rescue of sailors and fishermen in storms, having once been one himself. Parents[edit] Glaucus' parentage is different in the different traditions, which Athenaeus lists:[1]

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