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Home of The Virtual Egyptian Museum - King Padibastet's Tomb

Home of The Virtual Egyptian Museum - King Padibastet's Tomb

http://www.virtual-egyptian-museum.org/

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King Tut Revealed By A.R. Williams He was just a teenager when he died. Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Life in Ancient Egypt Life in Ancient Egypt Welcome to Life in Ancient Egypt, a companion online exhibition to Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Carnegie Museum of Natural History has acquired Egyptian artifacts since its founding and now holds about twenty-five-hundred ancient Egyptian artifacts. The most significant of these objects, over six hundred of them, are displayed in Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt. In the hall the artifacts are displayed in relation to the daily life and traditions of the people who made them, so that the objects are seen in the context of the culture. To present a cohesive picture of ancient Egyptian society, its technology, its social system, and its beliefs, we have arranged the objects in several thematic areas.

Explore Ancient Egypt Explore Ancient Egypt With 360-degree and other imagery, walk around the Sphinx, enter the Great Pyramid, visit tombs and temples, and more. Want to walk around the Sphinx? Clamber inside the Great Pyramid of Giza and seek out the pharaoh's burial chamber? Ancient Egypt - Ancient History Under Ahmose I, the first king of the 18th dynasty, Egypt was once again reunited. During the 18th dynasty, Egypt restored its control over Nubia and began military campaigns in Palestine, clashing with other powers in the area such as the Mitannians and the Hittites. The country went on to establish the world’s first great empire, stretching from Nubia to the Euphrates River in Asia. In addition to powerful kings such as Amenhotep I (1546-1526 B.C.), Thutmose I (1525-1512 B.C.) and Amenhotep III (1417-1379 B.C.), the New Kingdom was notable for the role of royal women such as Queen Hatshepsut (1503-1482 B.C.), who began ruling as a regent for her young stepson (he later became Thutmose III, Egypt’s greatest military hero), but rose to wield all the powers of a pharaoh. All of the New Kingdom rulers (with the exception of Akhenaton) were laid to rest in deep, rock-cut tombs (not pyramids) in the Valley of the Kings, a burial site on the west bank of the Nile opposite Thebes.

New clues illuminate mysteries of ancient Egyptian portraits WASHINGTON — Scientists are getting a clearer picture of how ancient Egyptians painted lifelike portraits that were buried with mummies of the depicted individuals. These paintings sharply departed from Egyptians’ previous, simpler artworks and were among the first examples of modern Western portraits, archaeologist and materials scientist Marc Walton reported February 14 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The “mummy portraits” date to more than 2,000 years ago, when the Roman Empire controlled Egypt. Three such portraits of Roman-era Egyptians, found more than a century ago at site called Tebtunis, were created by the same artist, said Walton, of Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Ancient Egypt The tomb of King Tutankhamun was found almost entirely intact in 1922. This headdress, placed over the mummified head of the deceased king in 1343 B.C.E., is made entirely of gold. Hieroglyphics, pyramids, mummies, the Sphinx of Giza, King Tut, and Cleopatra. The sands of the Nile River Valley hold many clues about one of the most mysterious, progressive, and artistic ancient civilizations. A great deal of evidence survives about how the ancient Egyptians lived, but questions remain.

Horus Horus is one of the oldest and most significant deities in ancient Egyptian religion, who was worshipped from at least the late Predynastic period through to Greco-Roman times. Different forms of Horus are recorded in history and these are treated as distinct gods by Egypt specialists.[1] These various forms may possibly be different perceptions of the same multi-layered deity in which certain attributes or syncretic relationships are emphasized, not necessarily in opposition but complementary to one another, consistent with how the Ancient Egyptians viewed the multiple facets of reality.[2] He was most often depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine, or as a man with a falcon head.[3] Etymology[edit] Horus was also known as Nekheny, meaning "falcon". Some have proposed that Nekheny may have been another falcon-god, worshipped at Nekhen (city of the hawk), with which Horus was identified from early on.

NatGeo Encyclopedia Xpeditions is now archived in National Geographic Education's new website—natgeoed.org If you liked Xpeditions, you'll love the new media-rich natgeoed.org. Explore the new site now for activities, maps, interactives, videos, homework help, and more! www.natgeoed.org Please note: to search for Xpeditions content, check the “include archive” filter. Fun lesson on Ancient Egypt with plan and resources The opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb: a reconstruction relay The activity that forms the basis of this lesson is called reconstruction relay. It is GUARANTEED to enthuse even the most recalcitrant Y4 boy! Pupils have to travel down a tunnel of tables to see pictures of the inside of Tutankhamun’s tomb. They must concentrate on memorising what they see as the gases inside the tomb only allow them 10 seconds before they must rush back and draw what they saw. Fortunately they are in team of four, so they should manage to get all the details drawn in the time.

Egyptian Mummies The methods of embalming, or treating the dead body, that the ancient Egyptians used is called mummification. Using special processes, the Egyptians removed all moisture from the body, leaving only a dried form that would not easily decay. It was important in their religion to preserve the dead body in as life-like a manner as possible. So successful were they that today we can view the mummified body of an Egyptian and have a good idea of what he or she looked like in life, 3000 years ago.

Hor-Aha Hor-Aha (or Aha or Horus Aha) is considered the second pharaoh of the first dynasty of ancient Egypt in current Egyptology. He lived around the thirty-first century BC and is thought to have had a long reign. Identity[edit] Name[edit] The commonly-used name Hor-Aha is a rendering of the pharaoh's Horus-name, an element of the royal titulary associated with the god Horus, and is more fully given as Horus-Aha meaning Horus the Fighter.[1] For the Early Dynastic Period, the archaeological record refers to the pharaohs by their Horus-names, while the historical record, as evidenced in the Turin and Abydos king lists, uses an alternative royal titulary, the nebty-name.[1][2] The different titular elements of a pharaoh's name were often used in isolation, for brevity's sake, although the choice varied according to circumstance and period.[2]

Absolute and Relative Location - Geolounge Ad Geographers can describe the location of a place in one of two ways: absolute and relative. Absolute Location Absolute location describes the location of a place based on a fixed point on earth. The most common way is to identify the location using coordinates such as latitude and longitude. Lines of longitude and latitude crisscross the earth. Room 61: Tomb-chapel of Nebamun The Michael Cohen Gallery1400 – 1300 BC The British Museum acquired 11 wall-paintings from the tomb-chapel of a wealthy Egyptian official called Nebamun in the 1820s. Dating from about 1350 BC, they are some of the most famous works of art from Ancient Egypt. Following a 10-year period of conservation and research, the paintings are now on display together for the first time. They give the impression of the walls of colour that would have been experienced by the ancient visitors to the tomb-chapel.

The Great Pyramid of Giza Pyramids of Giza, soaring above the city of Cairo, Egypt The Great Pyramid of Giza is the most substantial ancient structure in the world - and the most mysterious. According to prevailing archaeological theory - and there is absolutely no evidence to confirm this idea - the three pyramids on the Giza plateau are funerary structures of three kings of the fourth dynasty (2575 to 2465 BC).

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