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Babylon

Babylon
Babylon (Arabic: بابل‎, Bābil; Akkadian: Bābili(m);[1] Sumerian logogram: KÁ.DINGIR.RAKI;[1] Hebrew: בָּבֶל, Bāḇel;[1] Ancient Greek: Βαβυλών Babylṓn; Old Persian: 𐎲𐎠𐎲𐎡𐎽𐎢 Bābiru) was originally a Semitic Akkadian city dating from the period of the Akkadian Empire circa. 2300 BC. Originally a minor administrative center, it only became an independent city-state in 1894 BC in the hands of a migrant Amorite dynasty not native to ancient Mesopotamia. The Babylonians were more often ruled by other foreign migrant dynasties throughout their history, such as by the Kassites, Arameans, Elamites and Chaldeans, as well as by their fellow Mesopotamians, the Assyrians. The remains of the city are found in present-day Hillah, Babil Governorate, Iraq, about 85 kilometres (53 mi) south of Baghdad. Available historical resources suggest that Babylon was at first a small town which had sprung up by the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC (circa 2000 BC). Name History Classical dating Assyrian period

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babylon

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Petra Petra (Arabic: البتراء, Al-Batrāʾ, Ancient Greek Πέτρα) is a historical and archaeological city in the southern Jordanian governorate of Ma'an that is famous for its rock-cut architecture and water conduit system. Another name for Petra is the Rose City due to the color of the stone out of which it is carved. The site remained unknown to the Western world until 1812, when it was introduced by Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt. It was described as "a rose-red city half as old as time" in a Newdigate Prize-winning poem by John William Burgon.

Babylonia Babylonia was an ancient Akkadian-speaking Semitic nation state and cultural region based in central-southern Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq). It emerged as an independent state c. 1894 BC, with the city of Babylon as its capital. It was often involved in rivalry with its fellow Akkadian state of Assyria in northern Mesopotamia. Babylonia became the major power in the region after Hammurabi (fl. c. 1792 - 1752 BC middle chronology, or c. 1696 – 1654 BC, short chronology) created an empire out of many of the territories of the former Akkadian Empire. The Babylonian state retained the written Semitic Akkadian language for official use (the language of its native populace), despite its Amorite founders and Kassite successors not being native Akkadians. It retained the Sumerian language for religious use, but by the time Babylon was founded this was no longer a spoken language, having been wholly subsumed by Akkadian.

Lascaux Cave painting of a dun horse (equine) at Lascaux Modern entrance to the Lascaux cave Lascaux (Lascaux Caves) (English /læsˈkoʊ/,[1] French: [lasko][2]) is the setting of a complex of caves in southwestern France famous for its Paleolithic cave paintings. Persian Empire Persian Empire may refer to: Achaemenid Empire (550–330 BCE), also called "First Persian Empire"Parthian Empire (247 BCE–224 AD), also called "Arsacid Empire"Sassanid Empire (224–651 CE), also called "Neo-Persian Empire" and "Second Persian Empire"History of Iran under: Safavid dynasty (1501–1736 CE)Afsharid dynasty (1736–1796 CE)Zand dynasty (1750–1794 CE)Qajar dynasty (1785–1925 CE)Pahlavi dynasty (1925–1979 CE)

31 Architectural Wonders of the Ancient World Have you ever wondered what unknown stories might lie behind the relics of ancient civilizations? Here are 31 of the most impressive—and yet often still mysterious—architectural wonders from the distant past. They include the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Egyptian Labyrinth, Easter Island, and more. Crusades The Crusades were military campaigns sanctioned by the Latin Roman Catholic Church during the High Middle Ages through to the end of the Late Middle Ages. In 1095 Pope Urban II proclaimed the first crusade, with the stated goal of restoring Christian access to the holy places in and near Jerusalem. Many historians and some of those involved at the time, like Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, give equal precedence to other papal-sanctioned military campaigns undertaken for a variety of religious, economic, and political reasons, such as the Albigensian Crusade, the Aragonese Crusade, the Reconquista, and the Northern Crusades.[1] Following the first crusade there was an intermittent 200-year struggle for control of the Holy Land, with six more major crusades and numerous minor ones.

10 Incredible Architectural Wonders of The Ancient World The science and art of designing and constructing buildings and other physical structures has been of man’s interest since his very beginning. Architectural works have cultural rooting and symbolize the thinking of the society. When we look at the constructions of old days, we see wonders built by men with no technology. These wonders built after dedicated efforts of decades stand as a symbol of admiration and amazement. I have listed out a few of them.

Hotel Star Rating Information This overview outlines what guests can generally expect from motels, hotels, and resorts displaying a Star Rating assigned by us. However, these features and amenities may not be available at condominiums, apartment-style facilities, bed-and-breakfasts, and other specialty properties. Items listed may not all be offered at every property in a specific rating classification. Some criteria may vary from country to country. Our hotel star rating classifications are not a representation or promise of any particular feature or amenity. National Ratings awarded by the regional rating authorities appear for hotels in Europe and parts of Asia.

Derinkuyu Underground City Derinkuyu Underground City is an ancient multi-level underground city of the Median Empire in the Derinkuyu district in Nevşehir Province, Turkey. Extending to a depth of approximately 60 m, it was large enough to shelter approximately 20,000 people together with their livestock and food stores. It is the largest excavated underground city in Turkey and is one of several underground complexes found across Cappadocia.[citation needed] It was opened to visitors in 1969 and to date, about half of the underground city is accessible to tourists. Features[edit] Hotel Star Rating Explained Hotel star ratings are systems that rank hotels according to quality. Star rating systems are intended to serve as guidelines for guests who are making hotel reservations. While star ratings can be helpful when booking hotels rooms, there is no standardized star rating system.

Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos (Spanish, "Cave of the Oilbirds") is a natural cave located on the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains in the Morona-Santiago province of Ecuador. It is sometimes called Cueva de los Tayos de Coangos (the Río Coangos is nearby), presumably to distinguish it from other oilbird-containing caves with similar names. Description[edit] Located at an elevation of about 800 m within thinly-bedded limestone and shale, the principal entrance to Cueva de Los Tayos is within rainforest at the bottom of a dry valley.

What do those hotel star ratings really mean? Even though I'm the editor of SmarterTravel.com's Hotel section, I often find myself getting confused over the quality and value ratings of given properties and brands. While doing research, I would often find the same property listed as five stars from PlacesToStay.com, four stars from Travelocity, and three from Orbitz, for example. There seemed to be no one-size-fits-all measurement to rate a hotel's value, amenities, and overall potential for customer satisfaction. And if I was perplexed, I figured many consumers were as well.

Tahtzibichen Labyrinth Ancient Temple Originally submitted by coldrum. A slightly different article --- To enter Maya underworld, Xibalbá, a tortuous road had to be walked; at the end, according to Popol Vuh, the sacred Maya book, there was a lake with houses, where hard tests had to be accomplished. National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and Autonomous University of Yucatan (UADY) archaeologists think they may have found this legendary route inside caves and cenotes (sinkholes). Several constructions have been discovered in these underground spaces. Guillermo de Anda Alanis, director of El Culto al Cenote en el Centro de Yucatan (Cult to Cenote in Central Yucatan) initiative, revealed that finding these buildings has been a pleasant surprise, as they seem to corroborate what historical sources described.

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