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Top 25 Most Ancient Historical Photographs

Top 25 Most Ancient Historical Photographs
For times immemorial, people have tried to reproduce their surroundings into pictures of their own. They have used techniques of paintings, carving and sculpturing and for years images have been projected onto surfaces. Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries. 1. Source: (Link) Earliest known, surviving heliographic engraving in existence, made by Nicéphore Niépce in 1825 by the heliography process. 2. Source: (Link) The first permanent photograph (later accidentally destroyed) was an image produced in 1822 by the French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce. 3. Source: (Link) Boulevard du Temple, taken by Louis Daguerre in late 1838, was the first-ever photograph of a person. 4. Source: (Link) Robert Cornelius, self-portrait, Oct. or Nov. 1839, approximate quarter plate daguerreotype which is a procedure invented in 1839 using silver on a copper plate. 5. Source: (Link) 6. Source: (Link) 7. Source: Unknown 8. 9. Source: (Link) 10. Source: (Link) 11. Source: (Link) 12. Related:  Ancient History

An entire army sacrificed in a bog The excavation revealed a very special object – and axe, complete with a shaft, which is very rare. (Photo: Moesgård Museum and Aarhus University) A Danish bog has been harbouring a terrifying secret for thousands of years. Archaeologists have spent all summer excavating a small sample of what has turned out to be a mass grave containing skeletal remains from more than 1,000 warriors, who were killed in battle some 2,000 years ago. “We found a lot more human bones than we had expected,” says Ejvind Hertz, curator at Skanderborg Museum. The discovery of the many Iron Age bones has attracted international attention, partly because the body parts are macabre per se, but also because the bones are surprisingly well preserved. The site is located in the Alken Enge wetlands near Lake Mossø on the Jutland peninsula. Bones reveal wounds from weapons Some 2,000 years ago, the Alken warriors are thought to have been sacrificed to some gods, which we’re not very familiar with today.

The 7 Most Badass Last Stands in the History of Battle "Let me not then die ingloriously and without a struggle, but let me first do some great thing that shall be told among men hereafter." - Hector of Troy, Iliad XXII, Lines 304-5 Throughout the course of history, certain individuals have stood out as being completely fucking awesome. Whether it's cleaving monsters' faces in half with a chainsaw bayonet in Horde Mode, defending a makeshift fortress from a sea of brain-devouring zombies or manning a machine gun nest against an unstoppable sea of charging soldiers; people have always been fascinated with badass stories of one man, by himself, taking on a endless waves of assailants, refusing to back down in the face of insurmountable odds, dying with his fingers still clutching his weapons and leaving behind a smoldering, heaping pile of severed limbs, carnage and dead enemies. These are badass one-man last stands. Agis III of Sparta, 331 BC Agis wasn't above petty vandalism to make his point. Further Reading: Livius.org JStor.org Diodorus.

photographersrights 1. You can make a photograph of anything and anyone on any public property, except where a specific law prohibits it. e.g. streets, sidewalks, town squares, parks, government buildings open to the public, and public libraries. 2. You may shoot on private property if it is open to the public, but you are obligated to stop if the owner requests it. e.g. malls, retail stores, restaurants, banks, and office building lobbies. 3. Private property owners can prevent photography ON their property, but not photography OF their property from a public location. 4. Anyone can be photographed without consent when they are in a public place unless there is a reasonable expectation of privacy. e.g. private homes, restrooms, dressing rooms, medical facilities, and phone booths. 5.

Inflation and the Fall of the Roman Empire [This is a transcript of Professor Joseph Peden's 50-minute lecture "Inflation and the Fall of the Roman Empire," given at the Seminar on Money and Government in Houston, Texas, on October 27, 1984. The original audio recording is available as a free MP3 download.] Two centuries ago, in 1776, there were two books published in England, both of which are read avidly today. One of them was Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations and the other was Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Gibbon's multivolume work is the tale of a state that survived for twelve centuries in the West and for another thousand years in the East, at Constantinople. Gibbon, in looking at this phenomenon, commented that the wonder was not that the Roman Empire had fallen, but rather that it had lasted so long. I've been asked to speak on the theme of Roman history, particularly the problem of inflation and its impact. Monetary, fiscal, military, political, and economic issues are all very much intertwined.

Document Deep Dive: What Does the Magna Carta Really Say? | History & Archaeology Last month, the 1297 Magna Carta, a prized artifact at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., returned to view after ten months of conservation work. With funds from the document’s owner David M. Rubenstein, conservators at the archives used ultra-violet photography to reveal text that was lost to the naked eye due to water damage. They also removed old repairs and adhesives that were causing the document to contract, humidified and flattened the parchment and placed it in a high-tech case filled with inert argon gas, all to ensure that it is preserved long into the future. “We have every reason to believe that 800 years from now it will be in fabulous shape,” said Kitty Nicholson, deputy director of the National Archives Conservation Lab. It was nearly 800 years ago, after all, on June 15, 1215, that a group of noblemen presented the first version of Magna Carta to King John at Runnymede, just over 20 miles west of London on the River Thames.

Polish archaeologists in Sudan claim 'unique' human settlement discovery PR dla Zagranicy Nick Hodge 20.02.2013 14:32 Polish archaeologists working in Sudan have found remains of human settlements that appear to date back as far as 70,000 years. Photo: archeosudan.org If confirmed, the discovery in the Affad Basin of northern Sudan will challenge existing theories that our distant ancestors only began building permanent residences on leaving Africa and settling in Europe and Asia. “The Middle Palaeolithic discoveries in Affad are absolutely unique,” enthused Dr Marta Osypinska, one of the members of the team, in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP). “Last season, we came across a few traces of a light wooden construction. The team will be cooperating at the site in the Nile Valley with academics from Oxford University, in a bid to further unravel the geological history of the area. More information on the project, which is funded by Poland's National Science Centre, can be found at web site archeosudan.org.

Philadelphia Photo Arts Center Hiding the Lockheed Plant during World War II - wow this is amazing! Hidden in Plain View During WW II Lockheed (unbelievable 1940s pictures). This is a version of special effects during the 1940's. I have never seen these pictures or knew that we had gone this far to protect ourselves. Before... After.. The person I received this from said she got back an interesting story about someone's mother who worked at Lockheed, and she as a younger child, remembers all this. Another person who lived in the area talked about as being a boy, watching it all be set up like a movie studio production. Note.... I am 85 and had much of my pilot training in Calif. Hiding the Lockheed Plant during World War II - wow this is amazing! Please visit stories, etc. for more pictures, stories, etc. Please visit Videos 2 View for a great video selection!

Archaeologists Excavate a Lost Kingdom Buried Beneath Volcanic Ash Like Pompeii, evidence shows a human settlement frozen in time by volcanic pyroclastic flows. In 1980, people began to take notice when workers from a commercial logging company began dredging up pottery fragments and bones in an area near the little village of Pancasila on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. Other locals began finding coins, brassware and charred timber in the same region, all buried beneath a thick layer of volcanic deposits. Acting on the discovery of these finds in 2004, Volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson of the University of Rhode Island began investigating the jungle-shrouded area by using Ground Penetrating Radar. Sigurdsson's discovery touched off a series of formal excavations beginning in 2006 and continuing to this day under the direction of Dr M. One victim who was discovered during the 2009 excavations. The investigaive team will be returning to the site again in 2012. Excavating carbonized building beams (Photograph: Made Wita)

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