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Software as a service

Software as a service
According to a Gartner Group estimate, SaaS sales in 2010 reached $10 billion, and were projected to increase to $12.1bn in 2011, up 20.7% from 2010.[6] Gartner Group estimates that SaaS revenue will be more than double its 2010 numbers by 2015 and reach a projected $21.3bn. Customer relationship management (CRM) continues to be the largest market for SaaS. SaaS revenue within the CRM market was forecast to reach $3.8bn in 2011, up from $3.2bn in 2010.[7] The term "software as a service" (SaaS) is considered to be part of the nomenclature of cloud computing, along with infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), desktop as a service (DaaS), backend as a service (BaaS), and information technology management as a service (ITMaaS). History[edit] Centralized hosting of business applications dates back to the 1960s. The expansion of the Internet during the 1990s brought about a new class of centralized computing, called Application Service Providers (ASP). Pricing[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_as_a_service

Related:  Digital MarketingParticipation à l'évolution du système d'informationWikipedia KB7.3.2 Participation à l'évolution du système d'information

Social networking service A social networking service (also social networking site or SNS) is a platform to build social networks or social relations among people who share interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. A social network service consists of a representation of each user (often a profile), his or her social links, and a variety of additional services. Social network sites are web-based services that allow individuals to create a public profile, to create a list of users with whom to share connections, and view and cross the connections within the system.[1] Most social network services are web-based and provide means for users to interact over the Internet, such as e-mail and instant messaging. §History[edit] The most popular social networking sites by country Early social networking on the World Wide Web began in the form of generalized online communities such as Theglobe.com (1995),[15] Geocities (1994) and Tripod.com (1995).

Platform as a service Platform as a service (PaaS) is a category of cloud computing services that provides a computing platform and a solution stack as a service.[1] Along with software as a service (SaaS) and infrastructure as a service (IaaS), it is a service model of cloud computing. In this model, the consumer creates the software using tools and/or libraries from the provider. The consumer also controls software deployment and configuration settings. The provider provides the networks, servers, storage, and other services that are required to host the consumer's application.[2] PaaS offerings facilitate the deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software and provisioning hosting capabilities.[3]

Webconverger Webconverger is typically used in Web kiosk and digital signage deployments. It runs the Firefox web browser with a customised window manager dwm and a Firefox add-on also named Webconverger that locks the browser to a simple kiosk operation mode. The browser is locked down with most menus, toolbars, key commands and most right button menus disabled. Webconverger contains Adobe Flash support and PDF viewing by default. Service-oriented architecture See also the client-server model, a progenitor concept A Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a design pattern in which software/application components provide services to other software/application components via a protocol, typically over a network and in a loosely-coupled way. The principles of service-orientation are independent of any vendor, product or technology.[1]

Feedly §History[edit] In November, 2006, Edwin Khodabakchian co-founded DevHD.[3] The company seeks to create a platform that uses RSS feeds, online storage, and social media integration to connect users with the information they find interesting.[3] DevHD’s first project, Streets, which aggregates updates from a variety of online sources is the basis of Feedly. Feedly, which was optimized for RSS feeds, was first released on June 15, 2008.[3] Originally called Feeddo, Feedly was first released as a web extension before moving onto mobile platforms.[4]

Netbook HP 2133 Mini-Note PC netbook (front view, compared to a pencil) A Hewlett-Packard Mini 1000 netbook computer, a type of netbook computer Netbooks are a category of small, lightweight, legacy-free, and inexpensive computers. At their inception in late 2007[1] as smaller notebooks optimized for low weight and low cost[2] — netbooks omitted certain features (e.g., the optical drive), featured smaller screens and keyboards, and offered reduced computing power when compared to a full-sized laptop. Over the course of their evolution, netbooks have ranged in size from below 5" screen diagonal to 12". A typical weight is 1 kg (2.2 pounds). Virtual machine A virtual machine (VM) is a software-based emulation of a computer. Virtual machines operate based on the computer architecture and functions of a real or hypothetical computer. Definitions[edit] A virtual machine (VM) is a software implementation of a machine (e.g., a computer) that executes programs like a physical machine.

SlideShare The website gets an estimated 58 million unique visitors a month,[7] and has about 16 million registered users.[citation needed] SlideShare was voted among the World's Top 10 tools for education & e-learning in 2010.[8][9] SlideShare's biggest competitors include Scribd.com, Issuu and Docstoc. Some of the notable users of SlideShare include The White House, NASA, World Economic Forum, State of Utah, O'Reilly Media, Hewlett Packard and IBM. §Zipcasts[edit]

Backdoor (computing) A backdoor in a computer system (or cryptosystem or algorithm) is a method of bypassing normal authentication, securing unauthorized remote access to a computer, obtaining access to plaintext, and so on, while attempting to remain undetected. The backdoor may take the form of an installed program (e.g., Back Orifice) or may subvert the system through a rootkit[1] Default passwords can function as backdoors if they are not changed by the user. Some debugging features can also act as backdoors if they are not removed in the release version.[2] A backdoor in a login system might take the form of a hard coded user and password combination which gives access to the system.

Towards a Distributed Internet In preparation for the Contact conference that I am helping to organize this October in NYC, I’ve been in discussion with many different communities about the types of initiatives they would like to bring to the table. The purpose of the event is to ‘realize the true potential of social media,’ and determine what infrastructures need to be in place to enable peer-to-peer commerce, culture, and governance. My goal is to help facilitate these conversations now, so that come October, there is already a higher level of awareness and understanding of these issues, and more connections between groups working on similar objectives. To that end, one of the conversation threads that has begun, with the help of Paul B.

Cloud computing Cloud computing metaphor: For a user, the network elements representing the provider-rendered services are invisible, as if obscured by a cloud. Cloud computing is a computing term or metaphor that evolved in the late 1990s, based on utility and consumption of computer resources. Cloud computing involves application systems which are executed within the cloud and operated through internet enabled devices. Purely cloud computing does not rely on the use of cloud storage as it will be removed upon users download action. Clouds can be classified as public, private and hybrid.[1][2] Overview[edit] Pearltrees Pearltrees refers to itself as "a place for your interests".[8] Functionally the product is a visual and collaborative curation tool[9][10][11][12] that allows users to organize, explore and share any URL they find online as well as to upload personal photos, files and notes.[13] The product features a unique visual interface[14][15] that allows users to drag and organize collected URLs, and other digital objects.[16] that themselves can be further organized into collections and sub-collections,[17] (URLs). Users of the product can also engage in social/collaborative curation using a feature called Pearltrees Teams.[18] Pearltrees was founded by Patrice Lamothe, CEO,[22] Alain Cohen, CTO,[23] Nicolas Cynober, Technical Director,[24] Samuel Tissier, Ergonomy/UI[25] and Francois Rocaboy, CMO.[26] History[edit]

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