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Civil War Glass Negatives and Related Prints - About this Collection - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog

Civil War Glass Negatives and Related Prints - About this Collection - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog
All images are digitized | All jpegs/tiffs display outside Library of Congress | View All This online collection provides access to about 7,000 different views and portraits made during the American Civil War (1861-1865) and its immediate aftermath. The images represent the original glass plate negatives made under the supervision of Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner as well as the photographic prints in the Civil War photographs file in the Prints & Photographs Reading Room. These negatives and prints are sometimes referred to as the Anthony-Taylor-Rand-Ordway-Eaton Collection to indicate the previous owners. The Library purchased the negatives in 1943. Search tip for this collection: Try putting in very few search terms, particularly when searching for people (for example, try just the person's last name). Many additional Civil War images are in other collections, including drawings, prints, and photograph albums to name a few. View a slide show of samples. Andrew J.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/

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Georgia's Ratification Ratification of the Constitution by the State of Georgia, January 2, 1788. Georgia was the fourth state to do so. Georgia's ratification message was short and to the point. The following text is taken from the Library of Congress's copy of Elliot's Debates. In Convention, Wednesday, January 2d, 1788. To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting. Secession Era Editorials Project: Welcome! You may want to start with our hints and suggestions for using the collection. Users unfamiliar with the partisan newspaper press in the late antebellum period may want to read a short introduction to the partisan press which explains the circumstances under which these documents were first created.

SAT Subject Test: U.S. History: Toward War Toward War Abraham Lincoln’s victory in the election of 1860 began a chain of events that pushed the nation rapidly toward civil war. Secession During the 1860 election, some Southerners threatened secession pending Lincoln’s victory, even though he promised that while he would forbid the extension of slavery into the territories, he would not interfere with slavery in the South. In December 1860, soon after Lincoln’s victory, a special South Carolina convention voted unanimously for secession. By February 1861, six more Southern states followed suit: Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas.

Mathew Brady Mathew B. Brady (c. 1822 – January 15, 1896) was one of the most celebrated 19th century American photographers, best known for his portraits of celebrities and his documentation of the American Civil War. He is credited with being the father of photojournalism.[1] William Few Jr. (1748-1828) Patriot, legislator, pioneer, and financier, William Few Jr. was born in Maryland in 1748, to Mary Wheeler and William Few Sr. For some years the family lived in North Carolina, where Few's brother James was hanged for his part in the Regulator Insurrection, an uprising against what many citizens viewed as unfair taxation practices by royal government. Embroiled in political difficulties in North Carolina, the family moved to upper Richmond County, Georgia, in the mid-1770s. During the American Revolution (1775-83), Few fought in the Battle of Burke County Jail, served in the state legislative sessions, and took part in the 1777 constitutional convention. In 1780 he was elected to the Continental Congress. In the decade following the war, he, more than anyone, lobbied for the upper part of Richmond County to become a new county, a dream realized when Columbia County was created in 1790.

About this Collection - Civil War Maps Brings together materials from three premier collections: the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Virginia Historical Society, and the Library of Virginia. Among the reconnaissance, sketch, and theater-of-war maps are the detailed battle maps made by Major Jedediah Hotchkiss for Generals Lee and Jackson, General Sherman's Southern military campaigns, and maps taken from diaries, scrapbooks, and manuscripts all available for the first time in one place. Most of the items presented here are documented in Civil War Maps: An Annotated List of Maps and Atlases in the Library of Congress, compiled by Richard W. Stephenson in 1989.

Facts about the Revolutionary War *** Facts about the Revolutionary War This article contains fast facts and information about the Revolutionary War. Why did the American Revolutionary War begin? Because the American colonists believed that they deserved all the rights of Englishmen but were not receiving them. When was the American Revolutionary War? The Revolutionary War beginning date was April 19, 1775 with the The Battle of Lexington and the end date was September 3, 1783. Read the facts about the Revolutionary War for a fast overview of the American War of Independence. History of journalism The history of journalism, or the development of the gathering and transmitting of news, spans the growth of technology and trade, marked by the advent of specialized techniques for gathering and disseminating information on a regular basis that has caused, as one history of journalism surmises, the steady increase of "the scope of news available to us and the speed with which it is transmitted. Newspapers have always been the primary medium of journalists since 1700, with magazines added in the 18th century, radio and television in the 20th century, and the Internet in the 21st century.[1] Early Journalism[edit] By 1400, businessmen in Italian and German cities were compiling hand written chronicles of important news events, and circulating them to their business connections. The idea of using a printing press for this material first appeared in Germany around 1600. England[edit]

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