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AAEC - Association of American Editorial Cartoonists

AAEC - Association of American Editorial Cartoonists
Tooning into history Resources to help you include political cartoons in the study of different eras Herblock's 20th Century: From the Crash to the Millennium Herbert L. Presidential elections, 1860-1912 : Cartoons from Harper's Weekly Lincoln vs. America in Caricature Highlights from the Lilly Library collection of political cartoons. Baldy Editorial Cartoons, 1946-1982, 1997: Civil Rights, Cold War, Vietnam Clifford H. Cartoons from the Clifford H. Civil War and Reconstruction Who was Thomas Nast? His cartoons popularized the elephant to symbolize the Republican Party and the donkey as the symbol for the Democratic Party. Click here to find out more about Thomas Nast, including a biography, timeline and portfolio of his most important cartoons. Political cartoons from the presidency of Franklin D. Waiting for the New Deal, Supreme Court Reform, War years 1942, 1943 . . . Harry S. Post World War II cartoon resources Oliphant's Anthem: Pat Oliphant at the Library of Congress Related:  American History

Bryan's "Cross of Gold" Speech: Mesmerizing the Masses The most famous speech in American political history was delivered by William Jennings Bryan on July 9, 1896, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The issue was whether to endorse the free coinage of silver at a ratio of silver to gold of 16 to 1. (This inflationary measure would have increased the amount of money in circulation and aided cash-poor and debt-burdened farmers.) After speeches on the subject by several U.S. Senators, Bryan rose to speak. The thirty-six-year-old former Congressman from Nebraska aspired to be the Democratic nominee for president, and he had been skillfully, but quietly, building support for himself among the delegates. Listen to Audio: I would be presumptuous, indeed, to present myself against the distinguished gentlemen to whom you have listened if this were but a measuring of ability; but this is not a contest among persons. But in this contest, brother has been arrayed against brother, and father against son. We do not come as individuals.

Encyclopædia Britannica's Guide to Women's History For millennia, women have left their mark on the world, at times changing the course of history and at other times influencing small but significant spheres of life. Only in the past century, however, have concerted efforts been made to represent women's contributions more fully in history books. Consequently, changes in status for many women in modern times—the right to own property, to vote, and to choose their own careers—may obscure the accomplishments made by women of earlier eras. In selecting 300 influential women, Encyclopædia Britannica has included both contemporary women who are changing today's world and those whose contributions have endured through the ages. Some, though they lived centuries ago, are still alive in popular culture; music and poetry by the Roman Catholic abbess Hildegard can be heard in contemporary recordings, and Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji, one of the greatest works of Japanese literature, continues to inspire new translations.

Child Labor in America: Investigative Photos of Lewis Hine About these Photos Faces of Lost Youth Left - Furman Owens, 12 years old. The Mill Left - A general view of spinning room, Cornell Mill. Left - One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. Newsies Left - A small newsie downtown on a Saturday afternoon. Left - Out after midnight selling extras. Left - Francis Lance, 5 years old, 41 inches high. Miners Left - At the close of day. Left - Breaker boys, Hughestown Borough, Pennsylvania Coal Co. The Factory Left - View of the Scotland Mills, showing boys who work in the mill. Left - Young cigar makers in Engelhardt & Co. Left - Day scene. Seafood Workers Left - Oyster shuckers working in a canning factory. Left - Manuel the young shrimp picker, age 5, and a mountain of child labor oyster shells behind him. Field and Farm Work Left - Camille Carmo, age 7, and Justine, age 9. Left - Twelve-year-old Lahnert boy topping beets. Little Salesmen A Variety of Jobs Left - A Bowery bootblack in New York City. Left - A boy carrying hats in New York City.

Documents Relating to American Foreign Policy Prior to 1898 Documents Relating to American Foreign Policy Pre-1898 Pre-1776 The Mayflower Compact, 1620 John Winthrop, "City on a Hill," 1630 The Act of Surrender of the Great Charter of New England to His Majesty : 1635 Agreement of the Settlers at Exeter in New Hampshire, 1639 The Articles of Confederation of the United Colonies of New England; May 19, 1643 King Philip's War, 1675 King William's War, 1689 The French and Indian War Queen Ann's War, 1702 Father Rasle's War, 1724 David A. The French and Indian Wars Baron de Dieskau to Count d'Argenson (letter), Written at: Camp of the English army at Lake St. The French and Indian War's Impact on America 1755, The French and Indian War The Indian Wars THE ROLE OF THE DUTCH IN THE IROQUOlS WARS by Peter Lowensteyn The Seven Years War Governor Glen, The Role of the Indians in the Rivalry Between France, Spain, and England, 1761 The Boston Tea Party Anonymous Account of the Boston Massacre John Adams, "Novanglus No. 7," January 1775 The Battle of Bunker Hill, Lieutenant J.

How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF) The 90-Second History Of Education 9.80K Views 0 Likes Well here's an insanely detailed infographic to peruse. Rewind Your VHS Tapes Or Face $1 Penalty 623 Views 0 Likes Was it really that long ago when you had to stand up and walk across the room to rewind our VHS tapes to re-watch a favorite scene or catch a softly spoken line that you missed? POP QUIZ: What Is History? 3.42K Views 0 Likes I love these thought-provoking questions. Primary Source Documents For this entry, the previous subject matter was "Original Dictionaries of the 16th & 17th Centuries" and was linked to excellent work done at the University of Toronto. Time has marched on, links disappear. The works have matured and expanded. Our original list was--; Lion (Lyon) Gardiner's legacy--; Diary of Lion Gardiner (1635) The Gardiner Family of Long Island - genealogy (1635) GARDINER, Lion -- American engineer (1635) The Constitution of Plymouth Colony (1636) The Salem Covenant (1636) The Dedham Covenant (1636) Winthrop's Testimony (1636), the Boston Governor's account of his Christian experience. SNAPSHOT OF EARLIEST AMERICAN COURT RECORDS, including information about crimes and punishments--; The Pynchon Court Record , and earliest Springfield Court records, 11 Jan 1640/41 Massachusetts Body of Liberties (1641) Early written expression of the liberties asserted by the colonists in reaction to the oppressions of European governments. Areopagitica , John Milton (1644).

History - Colonial Authority Black slaves were prohibited from carrying firearms by a 1639 Virginia law, which prescribed 20 lashes for violations of the statute. There was one exception: with his master’s permission, a slave could bear firearms to defend against Indian raids. Massachusetts became the first colony to legalize slavery in 1641. In 1650, Connecticut legalized slavery. The Barbados slave code was set up by the English in order to provide a legal base for slavery in the Caribbean island. Slavery was legally recognized in Virginia with the passage of a 1661 fugitive slave law. A 1662 law decreed that the children of slaves took on the status of their mother, in contrast to common law, which conferred the father’s status on a child. In 1664, slavery was legalized in New York and New Jersey. In 1667 Virginia even enacted a law that decreed that baptism would not change the status of the converted, meaning that becoming Christian would not free a slave. Pennsylvania banned the importation of slaves in 1712.

1740 | Slave Code of South Carolina Editorial Introduction: Viewed through the looking glass of contemporary law as reflected in free and democratic societies, the 1740 Slave Code of South Carolina is most certainly an abomination. It is a stain upon British and American legal history - South Carolina was a subject Province (aka colony) of "Her Majesty" in 1740. But then, few if any countries have perfect historical records regards to slavery. This law reflected the reality that pursuant to property law as then in vogue, negro slaves were the chattel of their owners to do with as they liked; really, except for speech, no different from a pig or a horse. This code of law is striking in its horrific detail which confirms the pathetic status of fellow human beings, the slave. The Slave Code was quickly passed and became known as the Negro Act. South Carolina's Negro Act certainly went a step further. 1. 2.

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