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Visualizing Emancipation

Visualizing Emancipation
Visualizing Emancipation is a map of slavery’s end during the American Civil War. It finds patterns in the collapse of southern slavery, mapping the interactions between federal policies, armies in the field, and the actions of enslaved men and women on countless farms and city blocks. It encourages scholars, students, and the public to examine the wartime end of slavery in place, allowing a rigorously geographic perspective on emancipation in the United States. Use the filters to find specific types of emancipation events Move the timeline to view events in different date ranges Use the Map Options to add or remove additional layers

http://dsl.richmond.edu/emancipation/

Related:  History/ Social Sciences Subject GuideUS HistoryCivil War

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Visualizing Emancipation is a comprehensive map and timeline illustrating the slow decline of slavery in the United States. It provides quick access to thousands of primary source documents in connection with this timeline. by nda_librarian May 5

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