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The Underground Railroad: Escape From Slavery Student Activity

The Underground Railroad: Escape From Slavery Student Activity
Related:  Civil RightsCivil Rights MovementTeaching Ideas

African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68) The African-American Civil Rights Movement or 1960s Civil Rights Movement encompasses social movements in the United States whose goals were to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans and to secure legal recognition and federal protection of the citizenship rights enumerated in the Constitution and federal law. This article covers the phase of the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South. A wave of inner city riots in black communities from 1964 through 1970 undercut support from the white community. The emergence of the Black Power movement, which lasted from about 1966 to 1975, challenged the established black leadership for its cooperative attitude and its nonviolence, and instead demanded political and economic self-sufficiency. During the same time as African Americans were being disenfranchised, white Democrats imposed racial segregation by law. Violence against blacks increased, with numerous lynchings through the turn of the century.

The CNN Freedom Project: Ending Modern-Day Slavery - CNN.com Blogs Media and Technology Resources for Educators February 27, 2014 We are thrilled to announce the release of our entire Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum as a set of eight interactive, multimedia iBooks Textbooks, available for free in the iBooks Store... read more March 31, 2014 Imagine … a school district that is teaching Digital Literacy and Citizenship lessons to 28,000 K-12 students, with 1,800 trained teachers. Categories: Miss K's English lessons: 2- jeux/activités en ligne Quelques activités pour apprendre/réviser les loisirs en anglais! Quulques activités pour bien réviser les couleurs en anglais!! (cliquez sur les images!) sur cette page, essayez de dire de quelle couleur sont écrits les mots! c'est le même principe ici, sous forme de jeu! Attention, c'est chronométré! (activités trouvées @ echalk.co.uk) Combien de verbes connaissez-vous en anglais? A few webistes pages to help you learn or revise how to tell the time in English! Quelques sites pour vous aider à apprendre ou réviser à dire l'heure en anglais! Cliquez sur ce lien pour jouer à un jeu en ligne! Il faut cliquer sur les "fusées" pour faire éclater les feux d'artifice sur Londres! a large choice of online winter games! Pour les 6ème en priorité (mais les 4ème ont le droit de réviser aussi!!)

Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement -- Literacy Tests Literacy Tests & Voter Applications Alabama Georgia Louisiana: Mississippi South Carolina Background Today, most citizens register to vote without regard to race or color by signing their name and address on something like a postcard. Prior to passage of the federal Voting Rights Act in 1965, Southern states maintained elaborate voter registration procedures deliberately designed to deny the vote to nonwhites. This process was often referred to as a "literacy test," a term that had two different meanings — one specific and one general. The more general use of "literacy test" referred to the complex, interlocking systems used to deny Afro-Americans (and in some regions, Latinos and Native Americans) the right to vote so as to ensure that political power remained exclusively white-only. Poll taxes. While in theory there were standard state-wide registration procedures, in real-life the individual county Registrars and clerks did things their own way. — © Bruce Hartford

Desegregation The Civil Rights Movement is sometimes defined as a struggle against racial segregation that began in 1955 when Rosa Parks, the "seamstress with tired feet," refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Alabama. Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 Supreme Court case that attacked the notion of "separate but equal," has also been identified as the catalyst for this extraordinary period of organized boycotts, student protests, and mass marches. These legendary events, however, did not cause the modern Civil Rights Movement, but were instead important moments in a campaign of direct action that began two decades before the first sit-in demonstration. The story of the American Civil Rights Movement is one of those tales that is told again and again and again, often with a few protagonists, a couple of key events, and one dramatic conclusion. Right? Well, not really. Absolutely. So, when did that movement emerge and how? Nope. Without a doubt!

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship 10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship Added by Jeff Dunn on 2012-07-22 YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities. Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher’s Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF . The killer feature for this curriculum is the extra features that come with each video. Category: Videos Tags: digital citizenship , guide , How To , presentations , Videos You may also like 4 Comments

"Black Power" Era The impressive March on Washington in the summer of 1963 has been remembered as one of the great successes of the Civil Rights Movement, a glorious high point in which a quarter of a million people—black and white—gathered at the nation's capital to demonstrate for "freedom now." But for many African Americans, especially those living in inner-city ghettos who discovered that nonviolent boycotts and sit-ins did little to alter their daily lives, the great march of 1963 marked only the first stage of a new, more radical phase of the Civil Rights Movement. You probably just finished reading the first chapter of the Civil Rights Movement. (Hint, hint.) Isn't it incredible how much had been accomplished by civil rights activists from World War II to the 1963 March on Washington? Isn't it staggering just how much had been sacrificed, how high the stakes had been raised, and how widespread the movement had become? Let's quickly review some highlights. How can this be? Not exactly.

From NY to Texas, KKK recruits with candies and fliers Your video will begin momentarily. Ku Klux Klan recruitment fliers are turning up on driveways across the countryFliers, usually left with candies, appear to be part of a wider recruitment effortThe Klan may be seizing on a time when race and immigration are dominant issues, some say (CNN) -- Carlos Enrique Londoño laughs at the Ku Klux Klan recruitment flier recently left on the driveway of his suburban New York home. It's unlikely the group would accept him. "I'm Colombian and dark-skinned," said Londoño, a painter and construction worker who has lived in Hampton Bays on Long Island for 30 years. The flier was tucked into a plastic bag along with a membership application, the address for the KKK national office in North Carolina, a list of beliefs and three Jolly Rancher candies. Gen. Actors in the silent film "The Birth of a Nation," released in 1915, portrayed Ku Klux Klan members dressed in full regalia and riding horses. Klan members march in a parade in Washington in 1927.

The Person Doing the Work Is Also Doing the Learning Whenever I design lessons, conversations, professional development, or a conference session, I ask myself the following question: Who's doing the heavy lifting here? If the design requires me to do an extensive amount of talking, showing, and prompting, then I'm likely minimizing the retention and learning for the participant. In short, if I'm doing the work, then I'm also doing the learning. (Hat tip to a great teacher in Toledo who always says that!) That's why I LOVED Tim Bedley's recent lesson where fourth and fifth grade students ran an Edcamp for each other. Tim's students are definitely doing some heavy lifting with this lesson! I had the privilege of commenting on some of Tim's students' blogs. If there was more time to Edcamp, then it would probably be the best time of my life.

What can Teachers Learn from Nelson Mandela to Make a Difference? We teach language to help people communicate. Why do people want to communicate? ​ ​To express the human story through myth, inspiration and powerful transformation. ​ ​Let’s dig deeper into the story of Nelson Mandela and help our students think, communicate and become active narrators in the search for peace and what makes us human. What can we teach students about Nelson Mandela through the power of video and multi-media? Let’s dig a little deeper to find out;) 1) The Video: I chose this BBC video as a modern day look at Mandela’s legacy beyond South Africa. Then we ask questions and dig a lot deeper. Beyond politics, what other dark forces in our human nature perpetuate the kinds of violence and prejudice that can seem to be so innate in humanity as to be chilling to the core. When we stare into the black hole of violence and face the shadow side of life, how do we remain optimistic, inspired and willing to risk all for the common good? Our better natures. Where are they when we need them?

Strangers This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film called Strangers directed by Erez Tadmor and Guy Nattiv, and the theme of racism. Students predict a story, watch a short film, speak about racism and write a narrative. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate(B2.11) Learner type:Teens and adults Time: 90 minutes Activity: Predicting a story, watching short film, speaking and writing a narrative Topic: Racism Language: Adjectives to describe character and appearance, and narrative tenses Materials: Short film, discussion questions and anti-racism posters Downloable materials: strangers lesson instructions anti-racism posters racism discussion questions Support Film English Film English remains free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3

Myths of learner-centred teaching and learning Choice as critical thinking I recently received this feedback from one of the course facilitators of my Flat Classroom project after she had read some of my Units and reflections on the teaching and learning going on in them. Reading about the rich learning environment you've created for your students was a big wow! for me because you actually use choice as a critical thinking activity and I had never thought of it in those terms. You require students to consider what choices they need to make in order to make the best possible outcome...brilliant! I have written before about the need for choice and voice in the classroom and I have really been experimenting with it this year. Asking learners what they want to learn doesn't mean you don't need to plan. I know that many teachers who haven't read about or tried this way of teaching and learning think that I just turn up and make things up on the spot. The difference is in the way of planning and perhaps how the planning is recorded.

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