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Civil War

Civil War

The Civil War First Battle of Bull Run Kurz & Allison Civil War Facts Location Eastern Theater, Western Theater, Trans-Mississippi, Gulf Coast, Sioux Uprising Dates Soldiers Engaged Union: over 2,100,000 Confederate: over 1,000,000 Civil War Casualties Union: over 350,000 Confederate: over 250,000 See Details Of Civil War Casualties Outcome Union Victory Civil War Pictures The Civil War was the first war that was widely photographed. See our Civil War Pictures Civil War Maps The Civil War made wide use of battle maps. View our Civil War Maps Civil War Timeline See a timeline of events of the Civil War from 1861-1865. View our Civil War Timeline Civil War Battlefields The battlefields of the Civil War crossed the nation and made famous many previously unknown towns, crossroads, and farms like Antietam Creek, Shiloh and Gettysburg. View more Civil War Battlefields More Civil War Facts To view more Civil War facts and FAQs, please view our Civil War Facts page Civil War Articles » See all American Civil War Articles Milestones

U.S. Civil War 1861-1865 Jump To: Fort Sumter Attacked - First Bull Run - Shiloh - Second Bull Run - Antietam - Fredericksburg - Chancellorsville - Gettysburg - Chickamauga - Chattanooga - Cold Harbor - March to the Sea - Lee Surrenders - Lincoln Shot November 6, 1860 - Abraham Lincoln, who had declared "Government cannot endure permanently half slave, half free..." is elected president, the first Republican, receiving 180 of 303 possible electoral votes and 40 percent of the popular vote. December 20, 1860 - South Carolina secedes from the Union. Followed within two months by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas. Terms of use: Private home/school non-commercial, non-Internet re-usage only is allowed of any text, graphics, photos, audio clips, other electronic files or materials from The History Place.

A Brief Overview of the American Civil War Abraham Lincoln (National Archives) The Civil War is the central event in America's historical consciousness. While the Revolution of 1776-1783 created the United States, the Civil War of 1861-1865 determined what kind of nation it would be. Northern victory in the war preserved the United States as one nation and ended the institution of slavery that had divided the country from its beginning. The Civil War started because of uncompromising differences between the free and slave states over the power of the national government to prohibit slavery in the territories that had not yet become states. The event that triggered war came at Fort Sumter in Charleston Bay on April 12, 1861. But the real fighting began in 1862. Bodies in front of the Dunker Church - Antietam Battlefield (Library of Congress) For three long years, from 1862 to 1865, Robert E.

American Civil War History - American Civil War In the mid-19th century, while the United States was experiencing an era of tremendous growth, a fundamental economic difference existed between the country’s northern and southern regions. In the North, manufacturing and industry was well established, and agriculture was mostly limited to small-scale farms, while the South’s economy was based on a system of large-scale farming that depended on the labor of black slaves to grow certain crops, especially cotton and tobacco. Growing abolitionist sentiment in the North after the 1830s and northern opposition to slavery’s extension into the new western territories led many southerners to fear that the existence of slavery in america—and thus the backbone of their economy—was in danger. In 1854, the U.S. Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which essentially opened all new territories to slavery by asserting the rule of popular sovereignty over congressional edict.

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