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Documenting the American South homepage

Documenting the American South homepage
Documenting the American South (DocSouth) is a digital publishing initiative that provides Internet access to texts, images, and audio files related to southern history, literature, and culture. Currently DocSouth includes sixteen thematic collections of books, diaries, posters, artifacts, letters, oral history interviews, and songs. The University Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsors Documenting the American South, and the texts and materials come primarily from its southern holdings. The UNC University Library is committed to the long-term availability of these collections and their online records. An editorial board guides development of this digital library.

http://docsouth.unc.edu/

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Civil War Primary Sources Primary Documents by Topic: Most Popular Official Records Addresses & Speeches Acts, Bills, & Orders Military Correspondence & Documents Personal Correspondence & Narratives Prints & Photos Maps Document Collections Getting Started Primary Documents The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Background In the 1960s, Americans who knew only the potential of "equal protection of the laws" expected the president, the Congress, and the courts to fulfill the promise of the 14th Amendment. In response, all three branches of the federal government--as well as the public at large--debated a fundamental constitutional question: Does the Constitution's prohibition of denying equal protection always ban the use of racial, ethnic, or gender criteria in an attempt to bring social justice and social benefits? In 1964 Congress passed Public Law 88-352 (78 Stat. 241). The provisions of this civil rights act forbade discrimination on the basis of sex as well as race in hiring, promoting, and firing.

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Prentice Hall Brief Review in United States History and Government Course Content SuccessNet® Login Technical Support E-mail Technical Support for assistance. Brief Review in United States History and Government Welcome to the Brief Review in United States History and Government Web site. The 2012 Statistical Abstract What is the Statistical Abstract? The Statistical Abstract of the United States, published since 1878, is the authoritative and comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. Use the Abstract as a convenient volume for statistical reference, and as a guide to sources of more information both in print and on the Web. Sources of data include the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and many other Federal agencies and private organizations.

National Art Inventories What are the Inventories? The Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture document more than 400,000 artworks in public and private collections worldwide. The Inventory of American Paintings includes works by artists who were active in America by 1914. The Inventory of American Sculpture has no cut-off date and includes works from the colonial era through contemporary times. These online databases are supplemented by a photographic collection of over 80,000 images. The photographs are available for study purposes in our Washington, D.C., office. Declaration of Causes of Secession Declaration of Causes of Seceding States GeorgiaMississippiSouth CarolinaTexas Georgia [Copied by Justin Sanders from the Official Records, Ser IV, vol 1, pp. 81-85.]

Lesson Plans Tip: Press ctrl and F (or Command and F on a Mac) to perform a keyword search of this page. To keyword search all Best of History Web Sites pages use the search engine located on each page. Note: Best of History Web Sites features categorized and annotated lists of links to hundreds of K-12 history lesson plans, teacher guides, activities, games, quizzes, and more throughout its pages. Just scroll down most of our pages, and you will find an abundance of quality teaching resources. Featured Lesson Plans and Teaching Resources Center for History and New Media: History Matters The Center for History and New Media produces historical works in new media, tests their effectiveness in the classroom, and reflects critically on the success of new media in historical practice.

Immigration and Citizenship in the United States, 1865-1924: Digital Collections for the Classroom Is the United States “a nation of immigrants,” a “land of opportunity,” and refuge for the world’s persecuted and poor? Is the country made stronger by its ability to welcome and absorb people from around the world? Or are the new arrivals a burden? Post Secondary Prep The Students.gov website was retired on October 2, 2011. You can find the information and resources listed on Students.gov at the following websites: USA.gov—The U.S. government's official Web portal to federal, state, and local government Web resources and services.CareerOneStop—Your pathway to career success. This site provides tools to help job seekers, students, businesses, and career professionals. Sponsored by the U.S.

The University of Oklahoma College of Law: A Chronology of US Historical Documents Links marked with an asterisk (*) are to other websites and will open in a new window. Pre-Colonial To 1600 Missouri Digital Heritage: Before Dred Scott - An interactive lesson plan An 1807 Missouri territorial statute said that a person held in wrongful servitude could sue for freedom. Most of the people using this law to gain freedom were enslaved Africans. Since these cases were all brought for the same reason, historians call them "freedom suits." Suing for freedom was not easy.

Wisconsin Set to Pass Country’s Most Restrictive Voter ID Law Wisconsin will soon have the what’s arguably the nation’s most restrictive voter ID law. The bill was passed through the the Republican-led Senate late last week and is expected be signed into law by Gov. Scott Walker on Wednesday. Ages of Revolution: How Old Were They on July 4, 1776? - Journal of the American Revolution It’s a simple question — perhaps so basic that it’s been overlooked. How old were the key participants of the American Revolution? Authors often reveal the age of a particular soldier, politician or other main character in books about the Revolution, but I routinely find myself wondering about their peers at the same time.

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