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American Indian Stories.

American Indian Stories.
American Indian Stories by Zitkala-Sa [aka Gertrude Simmons Bonnin] (1876-1938). Washington: Hayworth Publishing House, 1921. [Page] [Frontispiece] ZITKALA-SA (Gertrude Bonnin)A Dakota Sioux Indian [Title Page] BY ZITKALA-SA (Gertrude Bonnin ) Dakota Sioux Indian Lecturer; Author of "Old Indian Legends," "Americanize the First American," and other stories; Member of the Woman's National Foundation, League of American Pen-Women, and the Washington Salon "There is no great; there is no small; in the mind that causeth all " WashingtonHayworth Publishing House1921 [Page] Impressions of an Indian Childhood A WIGWAM of weather-stained canvas stood at the base of some irregularly ascending hills. Here, morning, noon, and evening, my mother came to draw water from the muddy stream for our household use. "Hush; my little daughter must never talk about my tears"; and smiling through them, she patted my head and said, "Now let me see how fast you can run today." I was a wild little girl of seven. So! "How! Related:  Native American Women

2.cs.cmu This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. (Some of the translations are slightly different, the arrangement also differs, and the Grimm's scholarly notes are not included.) The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker. Zitkala-Sa, "The School Days of an Indian Girl." Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Bonnin). "The School Days of an Indian Girl." The Online Archive of Nineteenth-Century U.S. There were eight in our party of bronzed children who were going East with the missionaries. We had been very impatient to start on our journey to the Red Apple Country, which, we were told, lay a little beyond the great circular horizon of the Western prairie. On the train, fair women, with tottering babies on each arm, stopped their haste and scrutinized the children of absent mothers. I sank deep into the corner of my seat, for I resented being watched. I sat perfectly still, with my eyes downcast, daring only now and then to shoot long glances around me. In this way I had forgotten my uncomfortable surroundings, when I heard one of my comrades call out my name. Though we rode several days inside of the iron horse, I do not recall a single thing about our luncheons. It was night when we reached the school grounds. Entering the house, I stood close against the wall.

maps home page Down to: 6th to 15th Centuries | 16th and 19th Centuries | 1901 to World War Two | 1946 to 21st Century The Ancient World ... index of places Aegean Region, to 300 BCE Aegean Region, 185 BCE Africa, 2500 to 1500 BCE Africa to 500 CE African Language Families Alexander in the East (334 to 323 BCE) Ashoka, Empire of (269 to 232 BCE) Athenian Empire (431 BCE) China, Korea and Japan (1st to 5th century CE) China's Warring States (245 to 235 BCE) Cyrus II, Empire of (559 to 530 BCE) Delian League, 431 BCE Egyptian and Hittite Empires, 1279 BCE Europe Fertile Crescent, 9000-4500 BCE Germania (120 CE) Greece (600s to 400s BCE) Gupta Empire (320 to 550 CE) Han China, circa 100 BCE Hellespont (Battle of Granicus River, 334 BCE) India to 500 BCE Israel and Judah to 733 BCE Italy and Sicily (400 to 200 BCE) Judea, Galilee, Idumea (1st Century BCE) Mesopotamia to 2500 BCE Mesoamerica and the Maya (250 to 500 CE) Oceania Power divisions across Eurasia, 301 BCE Roman Empire, CE 12 Roman Empire, CE 150 Roman Empire, CE 500

Hoefel, Roseanne. " Zitkala-Sa: A Biography." Hoefel, Roseanne. "Zitkala-Sa: A Biography." The Online Archive of Nineteenth-Century U.S. Women's Writings. A Biography: By Roseanne Hoefel A vital link between the oral cultures of tribal America and the literate culture of contemporary American Indians, Gertrude Bonnin was the third child of Ellen Tate 'I yohiwin Simmons, a full-blood Yankton Sioux. As with many uprooted children, Zitkala-Sa returned after three years to a heightened tension with her mother and ambivalence regarding her heritage. Four years later, Zitkala-Sa re-entered school, graduated on to Earlham College to become a teacher, remaining socially reclusive even after congratulatory gestures by schoolmates when she won oratory contests. Later, Zitkala-Sa taught at CIIS in Pennsylvania, founded by Colonel Richard Pratt in 1879 to "save" Indians from white abuse and destruction by assimilating them and teaching them a trade. Zitkala-Sa was a controversial activist, as illustrated by her political record. Hafen, P.

An Overview of Cryptography As an aside, the AES selection process managed by NIST was very public. A similar project, the New European Schemes for Signatures, Integrity and Encryption (NESSIE), was designed as an independent project meant to augment the work of NIST by putting out an open call for new cryptographic primitives. NESSIE ran from about 2000-2003. While several new algorithms were found during the NESSIE process, no new stream cipher survived cryptanalysis. As a result, the ECRYPT Stream Cipher Project (eSTREAM) was created, which has approved a number of new stream ciphers for both software and hardware implementation. Similar — but different — is the Japanese Government Cryptography Research and Evaluation Committees (CRYPTREC) efforts to evaluate algorithms submitted for government and industry applications. CAST-128/256: CAST-128, described in Request for Comments (RFC) 2144, is a DES-like substitution-permutation crypto algorithm, employing a 128-bit key operating on a 64-bit block. 3.3.

Gertrude Simmons Bonnin : Voices From the Gaps : University of Minnesota Home > Artist Pages : Gertrude Simmons Bonnin Biography / Criticism Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, Zitkala-sa (Red Bird), was an extraordinarily talented and educated Native American woman who struggled and triumphed in a time when severe prejudice prevailed toward Native American culture and women. Her talents and contributions in the worlds of literature, music, and politics challenge long-standing beliefs that the white man's culture is good, and Native Americans are sinful savages. Bonnin aimed at creating understanding between the dominant white and Native American cultures. As a woman of mixed white and Native American ancestry, she embodied the need for the two cultures to live cooperatively within the same body of land. Bonnin was born in 1876, on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Though most noted for her literary and political genius, Bonnin was also an accomplished violinist and even won a scholarship to study at the Boston Conservatory of Music. Bonnin died in 1938.

Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations, Contents Introduction Chapter 1. Of the Division of Stock Chapter 2. Chapter 3. Chapter 4. Chapter 5. Introduction Chapter 1. Chapter 2. Chapter 3. Part 1. PART 2. CHAPTER 4. CHAPTER 5. CHAPTER VI Of Treaties of Commerce CHAPTER VII Of Colonies PART 1 Of the Motives for establishing new Colonies PART 2 Causes of Prosperity of New Colonies PART 3 Of the Advantages which Europe has derived from the Discovery of America, and from that of a Passage to the East Indies by the Cape of Good Hope CHAPTER VIII Conclusion of the Mercantile System CHAPTER IX Of the Agricultural Systems, or of those Systems of Political Economy which represent the Produce of Land as either the sole or the principal Source of the Revenue and Wealth every Country

Day 5- Native American Women’s Activism | Feminist Activism Image by Smithsonian Institution via Flickr Native American women, like their Arab, Asian, black and Latina sisters, have also struggled in naming their own identities. Christopher Columbus’s geographic muddling typed the indigenous people of the Americas as “Indians” for centuries. Today Native American and Indian are used fairly interchangeably, but there is growing awareness as to the number and diversity of remaining tribes. Many Latinas of indigenous heritage, from tribes that reigned from Central America up into modern-day Colorado, unlike activists in MEChA, do not identify as indigenous people or Native Americans because of the racism that plagues American societies. “Women who wish to share their similar experiences ought to be able to do so but [they should] do so within the context of being mindful that we are part of a larger body of people under siege and all of us are needed in the struggle.”[1] Another historical sister Native American women can look to is Molly Brant.

Wisdom and Humor: The Suslick Research Group The Three Laws of Thermodynamics (mathematically precise version) You can't win. You can break even only on a very cold day. Murphy's Seven Original Laws: In any field of scientific endeavor, anything that can go wrong, will go wrong. Levy's Nine Laws of the Disillusionment of the True Liberal —Marion J. Large numbers of things are determined, and therefore not subject to change. Aigner's Axiom: No matter how well you perform your job, a superior will seek to modify the results. The Airplane Law: When the plane you are on is late, the plane you want to transfer to is on time. Baruch's Observation: If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Bedfellow's Rule: The one who snores will always fall asleep first. Berra's Second Law: Anyone who is popular is bound to be disliked. Blair's Observation: The best laid plans of mice and men are usually about equal. Bucy's Law: Nothing is ever accomplished by a reasonable man. The Bureaucracy Principle: Only a bureaucracy can fight a bureaucracy. 1.

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