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U.S. Civil War 1861-1865

U.S. Civil War 1861-1865
Jump To: Fort Sumter Attacked - First Bull Run - Shiloh - Second Bull Run - Antietam - Fredericksburg - Chancellorsville - Gettysburg - Chickamauga - Chattanooga - Cold Harbor - March to the Sea - Lee Surrenders - Lincoln Shot November 6, 1860 - Abraham Lincoln, who had declared "Government cannot endure permanently half slave, half free..." is elected president, the first Republican, receiving 180 of 303 possible electoral votes and 40 percent of the popular vote. December 20, 1860 - South Carolina secedes from the Union. Followed within two months by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas. Auction and Negro sales, Atlanta, Georgia. 1861 February 9, 1861 - The Confederate States of America is formed with Jefferson Davis, a West Point graduate and former U.S. Army officer, as president.

http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/

Causes of the Civil War The issues that caused the Civil War had been brewing since the United States was formed. The most important causes Southerners listed for the war were unfair taxation, states' rights, and the slavery issue. Here are some primary sources that show how heated these issues had become by the late 1850s. Unfair Taxation The history and economy of the North were very different from those of the South. Factories developed in the North, while large cotton plantations developed in the South. American Civil War History - American Civil War In the mid-19th century, while the United States was experiencing an era of tremendous growth, a fundamental economic difference existed between the country’s northern and southern regions. In the North, manufacturing and industry was well established, and agriculture was mostly limited to small-scale farms, while the South’s economy was based on a system of large-scale farming that depended on the labor of black slaves to grow certain crops, especially cotton and tobacco. Growing abolitionist sentiment in the North after the 1830s and northern opposition to slavery’s extension into the new western territories led many southerners to fear that the existence of slavery in america—and thus the backbone of their economy—was in danger. In 1854, the U.S. Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which essentially opened all new territories to slavery by asserting the rule of popular sovereignty over congressional edict.

Women of the American Civil War Era Kindle Title Carolina RainOpen the page of Carolina Rain and step on the streets of an era gone by. Carolina Rain is not just a read, but an experience. The Civil War First Battle of Bull Run Kurz & Allison Civil War Facts Location Eastern Theater, Western Theater, Trans-Mississippi, Gulf Coast, Sioux Uprising A Brief Overview of the American Civil War Abraham Lincoln (National Archives) The Civil War is the central event in America's historical consciousness. While the Revolution of 1776-1783 created the United States, the Civil War of 1861-1865 determined what kind of nation it would be. The war resolved two fundamental questions left unresolved by the revolution: whether the United States was to be a dissolvable confederation of sovereign states or an indivisible nation with a sovereign national government; and whether this nation, born of a declaration that all men were created with an equal right to liberty, would continue to exist as the largest slaveholding country in the world.

Cass Gilbert Cass Gilbert moved to New York in 1899 after a successful career in St. Paul, Minnesota, that included the design of the Minnesota State Capital. His earliest building in New York was the Broadway-Chambers Building (1899–1900), a skyscraper with significant polychromatic terra-cotta, which still stands on the corner of Broadway and Chambers Street. Gilbert designed several other major skyscrapers, including two major buildings clad in Gothic-inspired terra-cotta, the West Street Building (1905–07; seriously damaged by the collapse of the World Trade Center towers) and the Woolworth Building (1910–13). For many years, the Woolworth was the world's tallest building and remains one of the most prominent features on the city's skyline.

Today's Document from the National Archives Considered by many historians as a turning point in the Civil War, the Battle of Gettsburg, fought from July 1 to July 3, 1863, was a major defeat for the Confederacy and for General Robert E. Lee in his second invasion of the North. Shown here is one of General Lee’s maps of Gettysburg, showing positions of troops on July 2. Cass Gilbert Buildings The Endicott Building143 East Fourth, Saint Paul The Endicott family of Boston owned a chain of drygoods stores. They needed to build a new store in Saint Paul, and they wanted a signature building to be built at a high profile location. It is amazing that young Cass Gilbert received this commission despite no previous experience building this kind of building.

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