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Classroom Materials

Classroom Materials
Created by teachers for teachers, these ready-to-use materials provide easy ways to incorporate the Library’s unparalleled primary sources into instruction. Lesson PlansTeacher-created lesson plans using Library of Congress primary sources. Themed ResourcesThe Library’s best exhibitions, activities, primary sources, and lesson plans on popular curricular themes. Collection ConnectionsHistorical context and ideas for teaching with specific Library of Congress primary source collections.

http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/

Related:  SOCIAL STUDIES - American HistoryInternet für Historikerinnen

a Program of the National Park Service NEW! Arthurdale: A New Deal Community Experiment Explore Arthurdale, West Virginia, and discover a town founded during the Great Depression when First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt championed subsistence homestead communities for struggling Americans across the country. In this lesson, learn about the impoverished Appalachian mining town that Arthurdale's homesteaders left and the Progressive-era theories about communal work, school, and rural life they tested at their new home. Meet 21st Century State Standards with TwHP Teaching with Historic Places lesson plans, based on the inquiry method, provide teachers with materials and question sets that encourage analytical thinking. Virtual Field Trips Home Browse: By Categories All Administrator ResourcesAssessment & Review Blended LearningBloggingBundles & ToolkitsBusiness EducationClassroom ManagementCollege & Career ReadinessCommon CoreCommunication & CollaborationDesktop ApplicationsDifferentiated LearningDigital CitizenshipDigital MediaDigital StorytellingESL/ELLGoogleInteractive WhiteboardsInternet SearchesiPads & Mobile LearningLearning Theories & StrategiesMembershipsNETS-TOrganizational & Time-saving ToolsPersonal EnrichmentPodcastingReading & WritingResponse to Intervention (RTI)School SafetySocial MediaSpecial Education STEMTech Integration BasicsTools for Student ProjectsVirtual LearningWeb Tool OverviewsWebsite CreationWikisWorkplace more... Favorites

Making of America aking of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints. For more details about the project, see About MoA. Making of America is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Let’s Give Up on the Constitution AS the nation teeters at the edge of fiscal chaos, observers are reaching the conclusion that the American system of government is broken. But almost no one blames the culprit: our insistence on obedience to the Constitution, with all its archaic, idiosyncratic and downright evil provisions. Consider, for example, the assertion by the Senate minority leader last week that the House could not take up a plan by Senate Democrats to extend tax cuts on households making $250,000 or less because the Constitution requires that revenue measures originate in the lower chamber. Why should anyone care? Why should a lame-duck House, 27 members of which were defeated for re-election, have a stranglehold on our economy? Why does a grotesquely malapportioned Senate get to decide the nation’s fate?

Parable of the Polygons - a playable post on the shape of society This is a story of how harmless choices can make a harmful world. These little cuties are 50% Triangles, 50% Squares, and 100% slightly shapist. But only slightly! The Persistence of Myth: The Causes of the Civil War Although there is little controversy among historians about the centrality of slavery in causing the Civil War, the myth of a “debate” persists. And with President Trump’s recent, historically inaccurate comments about the Civil War, this issue has once again been dragged into the spotlight, galling historians and history teachers. The notion that there is any controversy only serves to advance the ideology of white nationalists and so-called Lost Causers. In promoting this “alternative” view, these groups seek to undermine the role of slavery in secession, in the development of American capitalism and even in the creation of the United States. As historian James W. Loewen puts it:

American Dynasties The Historical Marker Database

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