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Sleep and Circadian Rhythm

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Why Can't I Sleep Part 1.

This is a post from the Gut Critters blog that ended November 18, 2016. Ray Medina gave permission for his material to be copied as long as it was attributed to him and not used for commercial purposes. – kiraonysko

Why Can't I Sleep Part 2. Why Can't I Sleep Part 3. Gut Microbiota Changes Linked To Sleep Loss. Shortening sleep changes the amount of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health, a new clinical study from Uppsala University suggests.

Gut Microbiota Changes Linked To Sleep Loss

Alterations in the composition and diversity of the gut microbiota have been associated with diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes. These diseases have also been linked with chronic sleep loss. But it is not known whether sleep loss alters the gut microbiota in humans. With this in mind, Christian Benedict, associate professor of neuroscience, and Jonathan Cedernaes, M.D., Ph.D, both from Uppsala University, collaborated with researchers from the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke. Senior author Jonathan Cedernaes says: Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans.

Results from a new clinical study conducted at Uppsala University suggest that curtailing sleep alters the abundance of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health.

Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans

The new article is published in the journal Molecular Metabolism. Changes in the composition and diversity of the gut microbiota have been associated with diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes in humans. These diseases have also been linked with chronic sleep loss. However, it is not known whether sleep loss alters the gut microbiota in humans. With this in mind, Christian Benedict, associate professor of neuroscience, and Jonathan Cedernaes, M.D., Ph.D, both from Uppsala University, collaborated with researchers from the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke.

Gut microbe movements regulate host circadian rhythms. Even gut microbes have a routine.

Gut microbe movements regulate host circadian rhythms

Like clockwork, they start their day in one part of the intestinal lining, move a few micrometers to the left, maybe the right, and then return to their original position. New research in mice now reveals that the regular timing of these small movements can influence a host animal's circadian rhythms by exposing gut tissue to different microbes and their metabolites as the day goes by. Disruption of this dance can affect the host. The study appears December 1 in Cell. Bacterial Circadian Clocks Set By Metabolism, Not Light. Most organisms on Earth, from bacteria to humans, possesses a circadian clock, a biological mechanism that synchronizes activities such as rest or growth to daily changes in a 24-hour day.

Bacterial Circadian Clocks Set By Metabolism, Not Light

Gut Microbes and Their Circadian Rhythm: Melatonin May Play a Role. Research has shown that melatonin may be an important player in the health of gut microbes and their circadian rhythm.

Gut Microbes and Their Circadian Rhythm: Melatonin May Play a Role

The old adage tells us, “You are what you eat.” While this is not entirely true, our GI tracts are indeed an important part of our physical and emotional health. Not only does what we eat feed our cells, but it also feeds our microbiome, or the populations of microorganisms that live in our GI tracts. Fasting, Circadian Rhythms…and the Potato Diet. Two studies published this week, both relate to the efficacy of The Potato Hack.

Fasting, Circadian Rhythms…and the Potato Diet

Potato diets are very healthy and can help you lose lots of weight and correct illnesses. Gut Bacteria Control our Health! How is the immune system linked to the circadian clock? Dr.

How is the immune system linked to the circadian clock?

Lora Hooper, a professor at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is investigating the relationship between the immune system and the circadian system in the gut. The microbiome researcher was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences in the US. GMFH editors interviewed her about one of her ongoing topics of study. Dr. Lora Hooper, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Sleep loss may impact the gut microbiota in healthy, young normal-weight individuals - Gut Microbiota for Health.

The researchers studied 9 normal-weight men (mean age 23.3 years) in a randomized within-subject crossover study with fixed meal times and exercise schedules: they examined the subjects after 2 nights of partial sleep deprivation (sleep opportunity 02:45-07:00h) and after 2 nights of normal sleep (sleep opportunity 22:30-07:00h).

Sleep loss may impact the gut microbiota in healthy, young normal-weight individuals - Gut Microbiota for Health

Faecal samples for microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid content analysis were collected within 24 hours before (baseline), and after the 2 in-lab nights, of either partial sleep deprivation or normal sleep. Furthermore, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test following each sleep intervention. Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes. Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

WIKIMEDIA, BOB SMITH, EPAJet lag may be as disorienting to the microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract as it is to the human, according to a new study of how disturbances to the circadian clock can impact the gut microbiome. Because Fiber Wasn’t Awesome Enough: New Science Suggests Fiber Improves Sleep Quality! - The Paleo Mom. You may or may not have seen a brief Facebook post I wrote about a week ago regarding an exciting hot-off-the-presses scientific paper that totally blew me away—so much so that I’ve updated my Go to Bed 14-Day Sleep Challenge to reflect this new information!

Because Fiber Wasn’t Awesome Enough: New Science Suggests Fiber Improves Sleep Quality! - The Paleo Mom

The paper is the very first to draw any kind of link between how much protein, fat and fiber you eat and how well you sleep. It’s no secret that I have a serious obsession with sleep (yeah, have you seen my epic, 280+ page e-book, Go to Bed? If not, where have you been?). The complicated relationship that we have with our sleep is a very real, very well-studied thing. We know that our sleep quality and duration have a huge impact on every organ system in the body (Seriously.

That’s right: a brand-new and very exciting study just published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine gives us even more details about what to eat for better sleep. The Science on Sleep & Diet The good news? Why Resistant Starch & Prebiotic Fiber Improve Sleep and Dreaming. Hey folks. I know, it’s been a while.

To make up for it, I’ve decided to take a request from the audience. A while back, reader Daz made a request: to look into the mounting anecdotal connection between prebiotic fiber — and specifically resistant starch in the form of potato starch — and improved sleeping & dreaming. One of the most prevalent reports from people who begin a high resistant starch regimen is the report of improved sleep and more intense, vivid dreaming. And I’ve found the dreaming part to be especially important, because it’s so specific and so peculiar. Well, at the time I decided to pass.

And then Daz asked again. Well, I admire persistence, so I bit the bullet and prepared to be disappointed. But first, a refresher. One of the central premises of this blog, if not the most central, is that our our gut microbiota produce byproducts when they ferment fiber from plant foods — short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) like butyrate, acetate, and propionate. And: Lastly: Well now.