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Thou shalt not commit logical fallacies

Thou shalt not commit logical fallacies
Asserting that if we allow A to happen, then Z will consequently happen too, therefore A should not happen. A logical fallacy is a flaw in reasoning. Logical fallacies are like tricks or illusions of thought, and they're often very sneakily used by politicians and the media to fool people. Don't be fooled! This website has been designed to help you identify and call out dodgy logic wherever it may raise its ugly, incoherent head. Here are some reasons you might want to order one of these pretty great posters:

https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/home

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Meet the Real Alice: How the Story of Alice in Wonderland Was Born On July 4, 1862, a young mathematician by the name of Charles Dodgson, better-known as Lewis Carroll (January 27, 1832–January 14, 1898), boarded a boat with a small group, setting out from Oxford to the nearby town of Godstow, where the group was to have tea on the river bank. The party consisted of Carroll, his friend Reverend Robinson Duckworth, and the three little sisters of Carroll’s good friend Harry Liddell — Edith (age 8), Alice (age 10), and Lorina (age 13). Entrusted with entertaining the young ladies, Dodgson fancied a story about a whimsical world full of fantastical characters, and named his protagonist Alice. So taken was Alice Liddell with the story that she asked Dodgson to write it down for her, which he did when he soon sent her a manuscript under the title of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground. Historian Martin Gardner writes in The Annotated Alice (public library), originally published in 1960 and revised in a definite edition in 1999:

Fallacies Dr. Michael C. Labossiere, the author of a Macintosh tutorial named Fallacy Tutorial Pro 3.0, has kindly agreed to allow the text of his work to appear on the Nizkor site, as a Nizkor Feature. It remains © Copyright 1995 Michael C. Labossiere, with distribution restrictions -- please see our copyright notice.

GIANT ROBOT FINGER ASSEMBLY NOTE: There are 3 levels of difficulty - -from a simple one-piece finger, to a whole hand -- depending how far you go in the instructions. Going to Step 4 will give you a basic finger with one tendon. That's enough to get the point about how tendons work. Romanticism Defining Romanticism[edit] Basic characteristics[edit] Defining the nature of Romanticism may be approached from the starting point of the primary importance of the free expression of the feelings of the artist. The importance the Romantics placed on untrammelled feeling is summed up in the remark of the German painter Caspar David Friedrich that "the artist's feeling is his law".[7] To William Wordsworth poetry should be "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings".[8] In order to truly express these feelings, the content of the art must come from the imagination of the artist, with as little interference as possible from "artificial" rules dictating what a work should consist of.

The 15 Craziest Things In Nature You Won't Believe Actually Exist Mother Nature is beautiful and amazing because we can see many amazing stuff like these 15 things that you won’t believe they actually exist. All these places are real. It is hard to believe in that, but that is true. 12 Things We Learned This Week What did you learn this week? We learned … …we may be able to geoengineer our weather to help mitigate climate change, and there is an actual debate in climate science, but it’s not the one you think. Guide to Philosophy on the Internet (Suber) Welcome to my collection of online philosophy resources. If you are stuck in a frame, click here to escape. If you are a frequent visitor, press reload or refresh on occasion to be sure that you are viewing the most recent version of the page, not the version cached on your hard drive from your last visit. I've marked recommended sites with a red star .

6 Strategies for Encouraging Critical Thinking I recently helped my 9-year-old son to complete a homework project for his class that had him analyzing a news article, answering questions, and then translating it into a different language. The purpose was to know what’s happening in another part of the world and then write about it in the language of the people affected. I watched my son work, and realized he copied and pasted, ran things through Google translate, and submitted it. Ancien Régime This article is about the administrative, judicial, and ecclesiastic structures of the Kingdom of France in the pre-revolutionary period. For a general history of France in this period, see Early modern France. For the political history of France in this period, see Kingdom of France. Much of the medieval political centralization of France had been lost in the Hundred Years' War, and the Valois Dynasty's attempts at re-establishing control over the scattered political centres of the country were hindered by the Wars of Religion. Much of the reigns of Henry IV, Louis XIII and the early years of Louis XIV were focused on administrative centralisation. The need for centralization in this period was directly linked to the question of royal finances and the ability to wage war.

10 Reasons Life May Be A Computer Simulation Technology Philosophers as far back as Plato millennia ago speculated that what we see may not be real at all. With the advent of computers, the idea took on new life, especially in recent years, with films like Inception, Dark City, and the Matrix trilogy. 10 Classic Victorian Fairy Tales Everyone Should Read The best nineteenth-century British and Irish fairy stories Say ‘fairy tales’ to most people and several names will usually spring to mind: Charles Perrault (who gave us Cinderella, among others, in his Tales of Mother Goose), the Brother Grimm (Rapunzel, Rumpelstiltskin – though the latter is now thought to be some 4,000 years old), and Hans Christian Andersen (the Snow Queen, the Ugly Duckling). But Victorian Britain gave the world its fair share of classic fairy tales too – but these are often eclipsed by those that originated in mainland Europe. The following classic Victorian fairy tales are taken from the wonderful Oxford World’s Classics anthology, Victorian Fairy Tales (Oxford World’s Classics), edited by Michael Newton. Robert Southey, ‘The Story of the Three Bears’. Southey is remembered more for his poetry now, or rather for being Poet Laureate from 1813 until 1843 (titles of few of his poems spring readily to readers’ lips).

Fallacies A fallacy is a kind of error in reasoning. The list of fallacies contains 209 names of the most common fallacies, and it provides brief explanations and examples of each of them. Fallacies should not be persuasive, but they often are. Fallacies may be created unintentionally, or they may be created intentionally in order to deceive other people. The vast majority of the commonly identified fallacies involve arguments, although some involve explanations, or definitions, or other products of reasoning.

How the 21st Century Fluencies Grow With Project-Based Learning “Learning is not a spectator sport,” D. Blocher once claimed. That’s so truthful when it comes to project-based learning. There’s more to it than giving our kids a goal and then letting them go. PBL goes hand in hand with the 21st Century Fluencies. At its best, PBL is students working together on projects that they care about, taking ownership of their education, and becoming lifelong learners.

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