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Gnosticism

In Gnosticism, the world of the demiurge is represented by the lower world, which is associated with matter, flesh, time and more particularly an imperfect, ephemeral world. The world of God is represented by the upper world, and is associated with the soul and perfection. The world of God is eternal and not part of the physical. It is impalpable, and time doesn't exist there. To rise to God, the Gnostic must reach the knowledge, which mixes philosophy, metaphysics, curiosity, culture, knowledge, and the secrets of history and the universe.[4][5] Gnosticism is primarily defined in a Christian context.[6][7] In the past, some scholars thought that gnosticism predated Christianity and included pre-Christian religious beliefs and spiritual practices argued to be common to early Christianity, Neoplatonism, Hellenistic Judaism, Greco-Roman mystery religions, and Zoroastrianism (especially Zurvanism). Nature and structure[edit] Common characteristics[edit] The main features[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnosticism

Related:  MythologyReligion and SkepticismAlan Watts

The Flat Earth Conspiracy: Is NASA Fooling The World? AnonHQ World Columbus was the only one of his time who believed that the Earth was round; everyone else believed it was flat. The Flat-Earthers thought the Earth didn’t fall because it was resting on huge elephants. But what were the elephants resting on? 2 Enoch Apocryphal book of the Bible The cosmology of 2 Enoch corresponds closely with early medieval beliefs about the metaphysical structure of the universe. Though it may have been influential on the shaping of those beliefs, the text was lost after several centuries; it was recovered and published at the end of the nineteenth century. The full text is extant only in Church Slavonic, but Coptic fragments have been known since 2009. The Old Bulgarian version itself represents a translation from an original in Greek.[1] Scholars generally attribute 2 Enoch to an author representing an unidentified Jewish sect, while others regard it as the work of first-century Christians.[2][3] Others consider it a later Christian work.[4] 2 Enoch is not included in the Jewish or Christian canons.

article8011035 Vedanta philosophy refers to the term “Maya” as the cosmic illusion on account of which the one appears as many, the Absolute as the Relative. Adi Sankara in the hymn Bhaja Govinda, also known as Moha Mudgara, cautions people about the power of Maya by which this entire creation is constituted, pointed out Sri B. Sundarkumar in a lecture. The bizarre road tunnel which sends people who drive through it 'BACK IN TIME' The tunnel in Guizhou Province, China, became the focus of investigation after hundreds of people reported going back in time once they exited the 400-metre structure. Most people reported gaining an hour in time after continuing their drive outside the tunnel, as their mobile phones had gone back exactly 60 minutes. The phenomena became so well known that one journalist working for the Gui Yang Evening News decided to carry out an experiment.

Pseudepigrapha Pseudepigrapha (also anglicized as "pseudepigraph" or "pseudepigraphs") are falsely attributed works, texts whose claimed author is not the true author, or a work whose real author attributed it to a figure of the past.[1] In biblical studies, the term pseudepigrapha typically refers to an assorted collection of Jewish religious works thought to be written c. 300 BCE to 300 CE.[citation needed] They are distinguished by Protestants from the Deuterocanonical books (Catholic and Orthodox) or Apocrypha (Protestant), the books that appear in extant copies of the Septuagint from the fourth century on,[2] and the Vulgate but not in the Hebrew Bible or in Protestant Bibles.[3] The Catholic Church distinguishes only between the deuterocanonical and all the other books, that are called biblical apocrypha, a name that is also used for the pseudepigrapha in the Catholic usage.

en.m.wikipedia Prajñāpāramitā personified. From the Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra. According to Edward Conze, the Prajñāpāramitā Sutras are "a collection of about forty texts ... composed somewhere on the Indian subcontinent between approximately 100 BC and AD 600. The Golden Geometry of Solids or Phi in 3 dimensions Having looked at the flat geometry (two dimensional) of the number Phi, we now find it in the most symmetrical of the three-dimensional solids - the Platonic Solids. Contents of this Page The icon means there is a Things to do investigation at the end of the section. 1·61803 39887 49894 84820 45868 34365 63811 77203 09179 80576 ..More.. The five regular solids (where "regular" means all sides are equal and all angles are the same and all the faces are identical) are called the five Platonic solids after the Greek philosopher and mathematician, Plato.

Intelligent design movement The intelligent design movement is a neo-creationist religious campaign for broad social, academic and political change to promote and support the pseudoscientific[1] idea of intelligent design (ID), which asserts that "certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection."[2][3][4] Its chief activities are a campaign to promote public awareness of this concept, the lobbying of policymakers to include its teaching in high school science classes, and legal action, either to defend such teaching or to remove barriers otherwise preventing it.[5][6] The movement arose out of the creation science movement in the United States,[7] and is driven by a small group of proponents.[8][9] Purpose[edit]

www.britannica Prajnaparamita, (Sanskrit: “Perfection of Wisdom”) body of sutras and their commentaries that represents the oldest of the major forms of Mahayana Buddhism, one that radically extended the basic concept of ontological voidness (shunyata). The name denotes the female personification of the literature or of wisdom, sometimes called the Mother of All Buddhas. In the Prajnaparamita texts, prajna (wisdom), an aspect of the original Eightfold Path, has become the supreme paramita (perfection) and the primary avenue to nirvana. The content of this wisdom is the realization of the illusory nature of all phenomena—not only of this world, as in earlier Buddhism, but of transcendental realms as well.

Heart of Hinduism: Doctrine: Sankhya and Yoga Kapila, who founded the school of Sankya. Some Hindus claim there were two Kapilas, teaching theistic and atheistic versions of this doctrine. Sankhya, derived from the word meaning "to count," is a philosophical system of analysing matter established by Kapila. It aims to overcome suffering through cultivating discrimination and by releasing the soul (purusha) from its entanglement in matter (prakriti). The Bible and violence The Bible and violence The Hebrew Bible and the New Testament contain narratives, poetry, and instruction describing, recording, encouraging, commanding, condemning, rewarding, punishing and regulating violent actions by God, individuals, groups, governments, and nation-states. Among the violent acts included are war, human sacrifice, animal sacrifice, murder, rape, and criminal punishment.[1]:Introduction The texts have a history of interpretation within the Abrahamic religions and Western culture that includes justification and opposition to acts of violence.[2]

en.m.wikipedia Popular Sutra in Mahāyāna Buddhism A reproduction of the palm-leaf manuscript in Siddham script, originally held at Hōryū-ji Temple, Japan; now located in the Tokyo National Museum at the Gallery of Hōryū—ji Treasure. The original copy may be the earliest extant Sanskrit manuscript dated to the 7th–8th century CE. The Heart Sūtra (Sanskrit: प्रज्ञापारमिताहृदय Prajñāpāramitāhṛdaya or Chinese: 心經 Xīnjīng, Tibetan: བཅོམ་ལྡན་འདས་མ་ཤེས་རབ་ཀྱི་ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པའི་སྙིང་པོ) is a popular sutra in Mahāyāna Buddhism. Its Sanskrit title, Prajñāpāramitāhṛdaya, can be translated as "The Heart of the Perfection of Wisdom". The Sutra famously states, "Form is empty, emptiness is form."

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