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Medieval History: Life in the Middle Ages & Renaissance

Medieval History: Life in the Middle Ages & Renaissance
Today, April 25th, is the 800th birthday of King Louis IX of France, the only French king ever to be made a saint. And he was a saintly guy. Well-loved by his people, he participated in two Crusades (which was considered a very pious thing to do in the Middle Ages). And he wasn't a half-bad king. The image was adapted from a 16th-century portrait of Louis by El Greco. It is in the public domain.

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Home Click here to jump straight to the articles: Original Preface. The Catholic Encyclopedia, as its name implies, proposes to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. What the Church teaches and has taught; what she has done and is still doing for the highest welfare of mankind; her methods, past and present; her struggles, her triumphs, and the achievements of her members, not only for her own immediate benefit, but for the broadening and deepening of all true science, literature and art — all come within the scope of the Catholic Encyclopedia. It differs from the general encyclopedia in omitting facts and information which have no relation to the Church.

The Theory of Two Truths in India 1. Ābhidharmikas / Sarvāstivāda (Vaibhāṣika) In the fourth century, Vasubandhu undertook a comprehensive survey of the Sarvāstivāda School's thought, and wrote a compendium, Treasury of Knowledge, (Abhidharmakośakārikā AbhiDK; Mngon pa ku 1b–25a) with his own Commentary on the Treasury of Knowledge (Abhidharmakośabhāṣya AbhiDKB, Mngon pa ku 26b–258a). This commentary not only offers an excellent account of the Sarvāstivādin views, including the theory of the two truths, but also offers a sharp critique of many views held by the Sarvāstivādins. Vasubandhu based his commentary on the Mahāvibhāṣā (The Great Commentary), as the Sarvāstivādins held their philosophical positions according to the teachings of the Mahāvibhāṣā. Consequently, Sarvāstivādins are often known as Vaibhāṣikas.

Medieval and Renaissance Fact and Fiction undefined This page is meant to be a guide to resources available on the Web for people who are interested in the history, culture, literature and re-creation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. There are hundreds of sites on the Middle Ages on the Web. I know I have only a small percentage of what is out there, but I have tried to organize this site so that you will have an easier time finding what you want. Please e-mail me to let me know about good sites that I haven't included yet. Welcome to my site. Plague, Plague Information, Black Death Facts, News, Photos Plague is a bacterial infection found mainly in rodents and their fleas. But via those fleas it can sometimes leap to humans. When it does, the outcome can be horrific, making plague outbreaks the most notorious disease episodes in history.

The Britannia Lexicon Have you always wanted to travel back in time to the Middle Ages but were hesitant because you didn't speak the language? Presenting the Britannia Lexicon of strange legal, feudal, chivalric, monastic, military and architectural terms to help you understand what those guys back then were really trying to say. In addition, we will soon be including lengthier entries on particular events, wars, movements and organizations, called "Sidebars of History" which will give a more in-depth view of life, politics and religion in medieval Britain. Just click a letter below to begin. Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history Smarthistory offers more than 1500 videos and essays on art from around the world and across time. We are working with more than 200 art historians and some of the world's most important museums to make the best art history resource anywhere. Use the "subject" pulldown menu (go to "Arts and Humanities") at the top of this window or click on the headings below to access our content: Art history basics First things first (you are here) The materials and techniques artists use Art 1010 Prehistoric art in Europe and West Asia

Internet History Sourcebooks Update Information 2006: In 2006 the Internet Medieval Sourcebooks and associated sourcebooks are undergoing a major overhaul to remove bad links and add more documents. 1. This project is both very large and fairly old in Internet terms. At the time it was instigated (1996), it was not clear that web sites [and the documents made available there] would often turn out to be transient. As a result there is a process called "link rot" - which means that a "broken link" is a result of someone having taken down a web page. EyeWitness To The Middle Ages and Renaissance Life in a Christian Monastery, ca. 585"When he was dead his body was not placed with the bodies of the brethren, but a grave was dug in the dung pit, and his body was flung down into it. . . " Crime and punishment in a medieval monastery: the monastery's Abbott provides insight into the monastic life. The Vikings Discover America, ca. 1000"There was no want of salmon either in the river or in the lake." Five hundred years before Columbus, the Vikings discover a New World.

Maps to be Used for the History of Europe Periodis Web - A Historical Atlas and Gazetteer of Europe from Year 1 to 2000 Europe in Year 2000 Europe in Year 1900 Europe in Year 1800 Europe in Year 1700 Middle Ages Updated September 2010 Terms & Glossaries / Timelines / Maps / Feudalism - Daily Life - Carolingian Empire/Charlemagne The Crusades - Heraldry - Chivalry - Knighthood / War, Warfare & Weaponry International Joan of Arc Society International Joan of Arc Society Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc The International Joan of Arc Society / Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc is a WWW repository of scholarly and pedagogic information about Joan of Arc collected by faculty, independent scholars, and students. Director: Bonnie Wheeler Assistant Director: Jane Marie Pinzino Founding Committee: Jeremy duQuesnay Adams, Ann Astell, Ora Avni, Robin Blaetz, Anne Llewellyn Barstow, Marie-Véronique Clin, Susan Crane, Kelly DeVries, Richard Einhorn, Jean Fraikin, Deborah Fraioli, Virginia Frohlick, Kevin Harty, Valerie Hotchkiss, H.A. Kelly, Angus J. Kennedy, Carolyne Larrington, Nadia Margolis, Selma Odom, Gail Orgelfinger, Kim Osner, Bob Peckham, Dietmar Rieger, Susan Schibanoff, Karen Sullivan, Charles T.

Timelines The story of vaccines did not begin with the first vaccine–Edward Jenner’s use of material from cowpox pustules to provide protection against smallpox. Rather, it begins with the long history of infectious disease in humans, and in particular, with early uses of smallpox material to provide immunity to that disease. Evidence exists that the Chinese employed smallpox inoculation (or variolation, as such use of smallpox material was called) as early as 1000 CE. It was practiced in Africa and Turkey as well, before it spread to Europe and the Americas. Edward Jenner’s innovations, begun with his successful 1796 use of cowpox material to create immunity to smallpox, quickly made the practice widespread.

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