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V I K I N G S : T H E   N O R T H   A T L A N T I C   S A G A

V I K I N G S : T H E   N O R T H   A T L A N T I C   S A G A

http://www.mnh.si.edu/vikings/start.html

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Viking Axe - Cold Steel Knives Specifications: Overall Length: 52" Hawk Length: 9 5/8" Primary Edge: 10 1/3" Steel: 1055 Carbon Weight: 4 Lbs. 10 oz Handle: 48" Long. Hickory Viking Axe Cold Steel has been a long time believer in the ferocious cutting power of a well-designed Viking Axe. Secrets of Lost Empires by Dennis Gaffney The trebuchet was one of the most devastating weapons of the Middle Ages. During medieval sieges, this destruction machine crushed castle walls. Using trial and error, medieval engineers adjusted the trebuchet to make sure its missile hit the castle wall—and destroyed it.

Prehistory-1500s Tip: Press ctrl and F (or Command and F on a Mac) to perform a keyword search of this page. To keyword search all Best of History Web Sites pages use the search engine located on each page. Pre-Colonial Web Sites The Sport of Life and Death: The Mesoamerican BallgameThe Sport of Life and Death was voted Best Overall Site for 2002 by Museums and the Web and has won a slew of other web awards.

History - Vikings Teaching Ideas Viking Longship Burning - A set of photos showing the burning of a Viking longship on the seafront at Arbroath in 2003. Contributed by a visitor. Vikings - Act out this story about a Viking family feud. Viking Ideas - The Cursed Sword - A collection of History / Literacy ideas which are based on the book 'The Cursed Sword'. Viking Ideas - The Troll's Treasure - A collection of History / Literacy ideas which are based on the book 'The Troll's Treasure'. What Vikings really looked like The fine decoration of the Oseberg ship in Norway, which was buried in the year 834, provides clues to what Vikings looked like. Inside the ship were two women and the archaeologists believe the ship has served as a sarcophagus. (Photo: Annie Dalbéra)

Black Plague Simulation A "Time Travel" Pilgrimage/Voyage during the time of the Black Plague Your old pal Professor Sy Entz has been reworking his Time Travel Machine in the garage. You have stopped by after school and are having a conversation with him about the early Renaissance and Medeval period in Europe (he is a history buff, besides being a science genius!). You muse half-aloud, "Wouldn't it be great to travel back to the days when people wore those interesting clothes and there were fortresses and knights and damsels and all of that kind of stuff?" "Of course," mentions Professor Entz, "this was a time of great pestilence, including cholera and the Black Plague!" Explorers Theme Page Explorers Theme Page This "Theme Page" has links to two types of resources related to the study of explorers. Students and teachers will find curricular resources (information, content...) to help them learn about this topic. In addition, there are also links to instructional materials (lesson plans) which will help teachers provide instruction in this theme. Please read our disclaimer.

Viking Longships - Children's British History Encyclopedia Many Vikings were good sailors because they lived close to rivers and fjords (sea inlets). They grew up from childhood able to use ships for fishing and travelling. A big Viking longship would be about 30 metres long and were made from overlapping planks of oak wood joined together with iron rivets (bits of metal hammered into holes). Each ship could carry 60 men. Sea-chests were used to sit on when rowing and to store personal belongings.

Mead hall A reconstructed Viking Age longhouse (28.5 metres long). In ancient Scandinavia and Germanic Europe a mead hall or feasting hall was initially simply a large building with a single room. From the fifth century to early medieval times such a building was the residence of a lord and his retainers. The mead hall was generally the great hall of the king. As such, it was likely to be the safest place in the kingdom. A medieval mystery - The National Archives Tax records can tell us a great deal about life in the Middle Ages. They don’t usually come with pictures, but this one does. It is a cartoon from 1233 during the reign of King Henry III. It’s a detailed, complex cartoon and it is a bit of a mystery. It was found on an Exchequer Roll, a kind of government document recording various payments that is stored rolled up. This roll listed tax payments made by Jewish people in the city of Norwich in Norfolk.

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