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René Magritte

René Magritte
René François Ghislain Magritte (21 November 1898 – 15 August 1967) was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for a number of witty and thought-provoking images that fall under the umbrella of surrealism. His work is known for challenging observers' preconditioned perceptions of reality. Early life[edit] Career[edit] Magritte's earliest paintings, which date from about 1915, were Impressionistic in style.[2] From 1916 to 1918, he studied at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, under Constant Montald, but found the instruction uninspiring. In 1922, Magritte married Georgette Berger, whom he had met as a child in 1913.[1] From December 1920 until September 1921, Magritte served in the Belgian infantry in the Flemish town of Beverlo near Leopoldsburg. Galerie 'Le Centaure' closed at the end of 1929, ending Magritte's contract income. During the German occupation of Belgium in World War II he remained in Brussels, which led to a break with Breton. Magritte Museum[edit] Related:  People 2Wikipedia A

ReMeDiOs VaRo - Mystical Surrealism undefined Biography This unique and sacred creature was born in Spain in 1908. Remedios always struggled to combine the mythic with the scientific, the sacred with the profane. Her parents were a big influence in her life; they were always teaching her moral aspects and the mechanics of life. Remedios decided to evade the civil war that was going on in Spain and moved instead to Paris where the art movements were in vogue. In Europe she was influenced by the surrealist movement and the metaphysics studies. Her characters are mystical and solitary; most of the times involved in scientifical activities. Diverse characters emerge in her painting with unusual attitudes: contemplative, passive, highly symbolic; reflection of the instability which can be overcome or changed. Unfortunately, in the fall of 1963 she died from excessive tension and an addiction to cigarretes. reference: The Art of Remedios Varo, Interactive CD. "Nacer de Nuevo", canvas (80 x 47cm.), 1960 "Retrato del Dr. Links

1948 Palestine war The 1948 Palestine war, known in Arabic as al-Nakba (النكبة, "The Catastrophe") and in Hebrew as the Milkhemet Ha'atzma'ut (מלחמת העצמאות, "War of Independence") or Milkhemet Hashikhrur (מלחמת השחרור "War of Liberation"), refers to the war that occurred in the former Mandatory Palestine during the period between the United Nations vote on the partition plan on November 30, 1947,[8] and the official end of the first Arab-Israeli war on July 20, 1949.[9] Historians divide the war into two phases:[10][11] The 1947–48 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine (sometimes called an "intercommunal war")[12] in which the Jewish and Arab communities of Palestine, supported by the Arab Liberation Army, clashed, while the region was still fully under British rule.The 1948 Arab–Israeli War after 15 May 1948, marking the end of the British Mandate and the birth of Israel, in which Transjordan, Egypt, Syria and Iraq intervened and sent expeditionary forces that fought the Israeli army. Background[edit]

Zeljko Tonsic Željko Tonšić is born in Zemun (Serbia) on 7th july 1954. His works are wide-spread through whole Europe. The critics call him one of the best painters of Fantastic or Symbolism. Long, sometimes long-stending process of creating a chef d'oeuvre, are reflected on his striving to perfection. His paintings help you to fall in love again. Balfour Declaration The Balfour Declaration (dated 2 November 1917) was a letter from the United Kingdom's Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour to Baron Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland. His Majesty's government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.[1] Background[edit] World War I[edit] In 1914, war broke out in Europe between the Triple Entente (Britain, France and the Russian Empire) and the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary and later that year, the Ottoman Empire). Zionism[edit] "Mr. Sykes–Picot Agreement[edit]

OKSANA CHAUS David Ben-Gurion David Ben-Gurion ( pronunciation ; Hebrew: דָּוִד בֶּן-גּוּרִיּוֹן‎, born David Grün; (16 October 1886 – 1 December 1973) was the primary founder and the first Prime Minister of Israel. Ben-Gurion's passion for Zionism, which began early in life, led him to become a major Zionist leader and Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization in 1946.[6] As head of the Jewish Agency, and later president of the Jewish Agency Executive, he became the de facto leader of the Jewish community in Palestine, and largely led its struggle for an independent Jewish state in Palestine. On 14 May 1948, he formally proclaimed the establishment of the State of Israel, and was the first to sign the Israeli Declaration of Independence, which he had helped to write. Ben-Gurion led Israel during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, and united the various Jewish militias into the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). Subsequently, he became known as "Israel's founding father".[7] Biography[edit] Zionist leadership[edit]

Chor Boogie Herbert Samuel, 1st Viscount Samuel Biography[edit] Herbert Samuel was born at Claremont No. 11 Belvidere Road, Toxteth, Liverpool in 1870. The building now houses part of The Belvedere Academy. He was the brother of Sir Stuart Samuel. In December 1916 Asquith was replaced as Prime Minister by Lloyd George. Women's rights[edit] Initially he had not been a supporter of women's suffrage but changed his position. Appointment as High Commissioner of Palestine[edit] Two months after Britain's declaration of war on the Ottoman Empire in November 1914, Samuel circulated a memorandum entitled The Future of Palestine to his cabinet colleagues, suggesting that Palestine become a home for the Jewish people under the British Rule.[9] The memoradum stated that "I am assured that the solution of the problem of Palestine which would be much the most welcome to the leaders and supporters of the Zionist movement throughout the world would be the annexation of the country to the British Empire". High Commissioner of Palestine[edit]

Kirk Reinert Pablo Picasso Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics.[4][5][6][7] Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. His work is often categorised into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919). Early life Pablo Picasso and his sister Lola, c.1889 Picasso showed a passion and a skill for drawing from an early age. Fame

Home Spanish Civil War The war began after a pronunciamiento (declaration of opposition) by a group of generals of the Spanish Republican Armed Forces, under the leadership of José Sanjurjo, against the elected government of the Second Spanish Republic, at the time under the leadership of President Manuel Azaña. The rebel coup was supported by a number of conservative groups, including the Spanish Confederation of the Autonomous Right,[nb 3] monarchists such as the religious conservative Carlists, and the Fascist Falange.[nb 4][5] The coup was supported by military units in Morocco, Pamplona, Burgos, Valladolid, Cádiz, Cordova, and Seville. However, rebelling units in important cities—such as Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Bilbao, and Málaga—were unable to capture their objectives, and those cities remained in control of the government. The Nationalists advanced from their strongholds in the south and west, capturing most of Spain's northern coastline in 1937. Background[edit] Military coup[edit] Outcome[edit]

Welcome Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, as well as the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death. Wilde's parents were successful Anglo-Irish intellectuals in Dublin. Early life[edit] Wilde Family home in Merrion Square Oscar Wilde was born at 21 Westland Row, Dublin (now home of the Oscar Wilde Centre, Trinity College), the second of three children born to Sir William Wilde and Jane Wilde, two years behind William ("Willie"). William Wilde was Ireland's leading oto-ophthalmologic (ear and eye) surgeon and was knighted in 1864 for his services as medical adviser and assistant commissioner to the censuses of Ireland.[4] He also wrote books about Irish archaeology and peasant folklore. America: 1882[edit]

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