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Flood myth

Flood myth
"The Deluge", frontispiece to Gustave Doré's illustrated edition of the Bible. Based on the story of Noah's Ark, this shows humans and a tiger doomed by the flood futilely attempting to save their children and cubs. A flood myth or deluge myth is a symbolic narrative in which a great flood is sent by a deity, or deities, to destroy civilization in an act of divine retribution. Parallels are often drawn between the flood waters of these myths and the primeval waters found in certain creation myths, as the flood waters are described as a measure for the cleansing of humanity, in preparation for rebirth. Mythologies[edit] The Mesopotamian flood stories concern the epics of Ziusudra, Gilgamesh, and Atrahasis. In the Genesis flood narrative, Yahweh decides to flood the earth because of the depth of the sinful state of mankind. Claims of historicity[edit] Nanabozho in Ojibwe flood story from an illustration by R.C. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Leeming, David (2004).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flood_myth

Related:  Aquarius 11thRecurring themes in mythologyWikipedia A

Aquarius (astrology) Under the tropical zodiac, the sun is in Aquarius typically between January 20 and February 18, while under the Sidereal Zodiac, the sun is in Aquarius from approximately February 15 to March 14, depending on leap year. The traditional ruler of Aquarius is Saturn, but modern astrologers believe that Uranus is the proper and only ruler. It is also one of the masculine signs, and a fixed sign. The sun locks beneath Aquarius tempers, And now the nights draw near to half the day, What time the hoar frost copies on the ground The outward semblance of her sister white, But little lasts the temper of her pen.

Legendary creature A legendary creature is an animal whose life is accounted in non-historical or yet to be verified stories that sometime involve the supernatural. However, other legendary animals, such as the unicorn, were documented in accounts of natural history by various scholars of antiquity.[1] Due to the lack of fossils of these creatures, the veracity of these historical recordings is questioned by modern zoologists. Some of the these creatures can also be cryptids, although the terms are not synonymous. Mahavira Mahavira (599 BCE–527 BCE[1]), also known as Vardhamana, was the twenty-fourth and last tirthankara of Jainism of present Avasarpani era (half time cycle as per Jain cosmology).[2] Birth[edit] According to Jain texts, Mahavira was born in 599 BCE.[5] [6] His date of birth is on the thirteenth day of the rising moon of Chaitra in the Vira Nirvana Samvat calendar.[7][8] In the Gregorian calendar, this date falls in March or April and is celebrated as Mahāvīra Janam Kalyanak.[9] Mahavira was born into the royal family of King Siddartha of Kundgraam and Queen Trishala, sister of King Chetaka of Vaishali.[10] Name[edit]

The Official Graham Hancock Website: Forum By Jim Alison Just as every point along the equator is 6,215 miles from both the North and South Poles, every point along the line of ancient sites is 6,215 miles from two axis points on Earth. The axis point in the Northern Hemisphere is near the Southeastern coast of Alaska, at 59° 42' N 139° 17' W, 25 miles Northeast of Yakutat, Alaska The North and South Poles have not always been in their present locations.

Noah's Ark Noah's Ark (1846), a painting by the American folk painter Edward Hicks A ship modeled after the biblical description of Noah's Ark, Ark van Noach, in the Netherlands Noah's Ark (Hebrew: תיבת נח‎; Biblical Hebrew: Tevat Noaḥ) is the vessel in the Genesis flood narrative (Genesis chapters 6–9) by which Noah saves himself, his family, and a remnant of all the world's animals from the flood. God gives Noah detailed instructions for building the ark: it is to be of gopher wood, smeared inside and out with pitch, with three decks and internal compartments; it will be 300 cubits long (137.16 m, 450 ft), 50 wide (22.86 m, 75 ft), and 30 high (13.716 m, 45 ft); it will have a roof "finished to a cubit upward"; and an entrance on the side. The story goes on to describe the ark being afloat throughout the flood and subsequent receding of the waters before it came to rest on Mount Ararat.

Fixed Sign In Astrology, Fixed Signs are associated with stabilization, determination, depth and persistence. They are powerful and willfull in all they do, often achieving much more than the other two qualities. On the other hand, they are also inflexible, rigid, stubborn, opinionated and single-minded. These traits are often paired with the need to be considered "right": they will ruthlessly fight on behalf of their beliefs, regardless of any contrary beliefs.

LGBT themes in mythology The presence of LGBT themes in Western mythologies has long been recognised, and the subject of intense study. The application of gender studies and queer theory to non-Western mythic tradition is less developed, but has been growing since the end of the twentieth century.[1] Myths often include homosexuality, bisexuality or transgenderism as a symbol for sacred or mythic experiences.[2] Devdutt Pattanaik writes that myths "capture the collective unconsciousness of a people", and that this means they reflect deep-rooted beliefs about variant sexualities that may be at odds with repressive social mores.[3] Critical perspective[edit] Lion Capital of Ashoka The original Lion Capital. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions are seated back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a Lion. The wheel "Ashoka Chakra" from its base has been placed onto the centre of the National Flag of India.

Noah's Ark Discovered Listen to this page in audio (MP3) by Dan Eden for viewzone Why is this not a BIG story? I'm often amazed at our lack of knowledge about history. Ordinary people are hungry for this information, yet the organizations responsible to disseminate these facts seem to have an agenda to keep us in the dark. Manu (Hinduism) Matsya protecting the Manu and the seven sages at the time of Deluge In some Hindu traditions, Manu is a title accorded to a progenitor of humanity. According to these traditions, the current time period is ruled by the seventh Manu called the Vaivasvata Manu, the son of Vivasvân and his wife Sanjnâ.[1] Vaivasvata Manu, whose original name was Satyavrata, is the 7th Manu and considered the first king to rule this earth, who saved humanity from the great flood — after being warned of it by the Matsya avatar of Vishnu,[2] who had also advised him to build a giant boat. The story is mentioned in early Hindu scriptures such as the Satapatha Brahmana, and it has often been compared with the popular traditions of a Great Deluge from other cultures around the world,[3] particularly that of Noah's Ark.[4] Because Manu was believed to be absolutely honest, he was initially known as Satyavrata ("One with the oath of truth"). Vaivasvata Manu ruled as King Manu.[5][6][7] His wife was Sraddha.[8]

Aquarius (constellation) (Unicode ♒), a representation of water. In the Greek tradition, the constellation became represented as simply a single vase from which a stream poured down to Piscis Austrinus. The name in the Hindu zodiac is likewise kumbha "water-pitcher", showing that the zodiac reached India via Greek intermediaries. In the first century CE, Ptolemy's Almagest established the common Western depiction of Aquarius.

Mytheme In the study of mythology, a mytheme is the essential kernel of a myth—an irreducible, unchanging element,[1] a minimal unit that is always found shared with other, related mythemes and reassembled in various ways ("bundled" was Claude Lévi-Strauss's image)[2] or linked in more complicated relationships. For example, the myths of Adonis and Osiris share several elements, leading some scholars to conclude that they share a source, i.e. images passed down in cultures or from one to another, being ascribed new interpretations of the action depicted as well as new names in various readings of icons. Claude Lévi-Strauss, who gave the term wide circulation,[3] wrote, "If one wants to establish a parallel between structural linguistics and the structural analysis of myths, the correspondence is established, not between mytheme and word but between mytheme and phoneme".[4] The structuralist analyzer of folk tales, Vladimir Propp, considered that the unit of analysis was the individual tale.

Ashoka Ashoka Maurya (/əˈʃoʊkə/; Sanskrit: अशोक मौर्य; 304–232 BCE), commonly known as Ashoka and also as Ashoka the Great, was an Indian emperor of the Maurya Dynasty who ruled almost all of the Indian subcontinent from circa 269 BCE to 232 BCE.[1] One of India's greatest emperors, Ashoka reigned over a realm that stretched from the Hindu Kush mountains in the west to Bengal in the East and covered the entire Indian subcontinent except parts of present day Tamil Nadu and Kerala. The empire's capital was Pataliputra (in Magadha, present-day Bihar), with provincial capitals at Taxila and Ujjain. Ashoka is referred to as Samraat Chakravartin Ashoka – the "Emperor of Emperors Ashoka." His name "Aśoka" means "painless, without sorrow" in Sanskrit (the a privativum and śoka "pain, distress"). In his edicts, he is referred to as Devānāmpriya (Pali Devānaṃpiya or "The Beloved of the Gods"), and Priyadarśin (Pali Piyadasī or "He who regards everyone with affection"). H.G.

A giant mystery: 18 strange giant skeletons found in Wisconsin: Sons of god; Men of renown Here's one for your "Forbidden Archaeology" file.Scientists are remaining stubbornly silent about a lost race of giants found in burial mounds near Lake Delavan, Wisconsin, in May 1912. The dig site at Lake Delavan was overseen by Beloit College and it included more than 200 effigy mounds that proved to be classic examples of 8th century Woodland Culture. But the enormous size of the skeletons and elongated skulls found in May 1912 did not fit very neatly into anyone's concept of a textbook standard. They were enormous.

Related:  Major Themes /temas