background preloader

Epic of Gilgamesh

Epic of Gilgamesh
The Epic of Gilgamesh, an epic poem from Mesopotamia, is considered the world's first truly great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk. These independent stories were used as source material for a combined epic. The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shūtur eli sharrī ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Only a few tablets of it have survived. The later "Standard" version dates from the 13th to the 10th centuries BC and bears the incipit Sha naqba īmuru ("He who Saw the Deep", in modern terms: "He who Sees the Unknown"). The first half of the story discusses Gilgamesh, king of Uruk, and Enkidu, a wild man created by the gods to stop him oppressing the people of Uruk. History[edit] Versions of the epic[edit] Standard Akkadian version[edit] (Based on Andrew George's translation)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epic_of_Gilgamesh

Related:  mythologyWikipedia BmithWikipedia A

Scriptorium - The Ogdoad The Ogdoad were the primeval forces of chaos in Egyptian mythology, represented as eight deities that existed before the creation of the sun god. The eight were considered as four couples, each embodying a different aspect of the primal world: Nun and Naunet, the god and goddess of the primordial waters; Kek and Keket, the deities of darkness; Amon and Amaunet representing invisible power; and Heh and Hehet representing infinity. Occasionally other couples were included in the Ogdoad, but eight was always the total number of deities involved. Between and from themselves, the Ogdoad created a mound that rose from the primeval waters, and on this they formed an egg from which the young sun god emerged. Thus they were sometimes depicted as baboons heralding the first sunrise, as in this papyrus (left) from around 1350BC, showing seven of the Ogdoad and Horus, the falcon form of the sun god Ra-Harakhty.

Mercury From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Mercury commonly refers to: Mercury may also refer to: Rubedo Interpretation[edit] The symbols used in alchemical writing and art to represent this red stage can include blood, a phoenix, a rose, a crowned king, or a figure wearing red clothes. Countless sources give mention to a reddening process. The seventeenth dictum of the 12th century Turba Philosophorum is one example: Tūmatauenga A human face depicted in a house carving. Tūmatauenga, god of war, is the ancestor of humankind In Māori mythology, Tū or Tūmatauenga (Māori: 'Tū of the angry face') is one of the great gods, the origin of War and Balance. All war-parties were dedicated to him, and he was treated with the greatest respect and awe. He is usually a son of the primordial parent, sky and earth (see Rangi and Papa).

Gilgamesh Gilgamesh (/ˈɡɪl.ɡə.mɛʃ/; Akkadian cuneiform: 𒄑𒂆𒈦 [𒄑𒂆𒈦], Gilgameš, often given the epithet of the King, also known as Bilgamesh in the Sumerian texts)[1] was the fifth king of Uruk, modern day Iraq (Early Dynastic II, first dynasty of Uruk), placing his reign ca. 2500 BC. According to the Sumerian King List he reigned for 126 years. In the Tummal Inscription,[2] Gilgamesh, and his son Urlugal, rebuilt the sanctuary of the goddess Ninlil, in Tummal, a sacred quarter in her city of Nippur. Gilgamesh is the central character in the Epic of Gilgamesh, the greatest surviving work of early Mesopotamian literature. In the epic his father was Lugalbanda and his mother was Ninsun (whom some call Rimat Ninsun), a goddess. In Mesopotamian mythology, Gilgamesh is a demigod of superhuman strength who built the city walls of Uruk to defend his people from external threats, and travelled to meet the sage Utnapishtim, who had survived the Great Deluge.

Ganymede Ganymede commonly refers to: Ganymede, Ganymed or Ganymedes may also refer to: Salem witch trials The central figure in this 1876 illustration of the courtroom is usually identified as Mary Walcott. The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings and prosecutions of people accused of witchcraft in colonial Massachusetts between February 1692 and May 1693. The trials resulted in the executions of twenty people, most of them women. Despite being generally known as the Salem witch trials, the preliminary hearings in 1692 were conducted in several towns in the Province of Massachusetts Bay: Salem Village (now Danvers), Ipswich, Andover, and Salem Town.

Nigredo For the character in Xenosaga, see Gaignun Kukai. Nigredo is also an album by Diary of Dreams. Nigredo, or blackness, in alchemy means putrefaction or decomposition. The alchemists believed that as a first step in the pathway to the philosopher's stone all alchemical ingredients had to be cleansed and cooked extensively to a uniform black matter.[1] Jung[edit] For Carl Jung, 'the rediscovery of the principles of alchemy came to be an important part of my work as a pioneer of psychology'.[3] As a student of alchemy, he (and his followers) 'compared the "black work" of the alchemists (the nigredo) with the often highly critical involvement experienced by the ego, until it accepts the new equilibrium brought about by the creation of the self'.[4] Jungians interpreted nigredo in two main psychological senses.

Wars of the Roses The Wars of the Roses were a series of dynastic wars for the throne of England. They were fought between supporters of two rival branches of the royal House of Plantagenet, the houses of Lancaster and York. They were fought in several sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487, although there was related fighting before and after this period. The conflict resulted from social and financial troubles that followed the Hundred Years' War, combined with the mental infirmity and weak rule of Henry VI, which revived interest in the alternative claim to the throne of Richard, Duke of York.

Marduk Marduk (Sumerian spelling in Akkadian: AMAR.UTU 𒀫𒌓 "solar calf"; perhaps from MERI.DUG; Biblical Hebrew מְרֹדַךְ Merodach; Greek Μαρδοχαῖος,[1] Mardochaios) was the Babylonian name of a late-generation god from ancient Mesopotamia and patron deity of the city of Babylon, who, when Babylon became the political center of the Euphrates valley in the time of Hammurabi (18th century BCE), started to slowly rise to the position of the head of the Babylonian pantheon, a position he fully acquired by the second half of the second millennium BCE. In the city of Babylon, he resided in the temple Esagila.[2] According to The Encyclopedia of Religion, the name Marduk was probably pronounced Marutuk. In the perfected system of astrology, the planet Jupiter was associated with Marduk by the Hammurabi period.[4] Mythology[edit]

Related:  Biblical ArtifactsMesopotamian ReligionRecovered MythologyWikipedia B