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IF THE WORLD WERE 100 PEOPLE UPDATED

IF THE WORLD WERE 100 PEOPLE UPDATED

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6eTr4ldDYg

Related:  ethics and sustainabilityaamador

100 People: A World Portrait Picture this complex world simply - the world as 100 people. 7 billion of us share this planet. Who are we? What do we look like? If The World Were A Village of 100 People Sometimes we can be caught up with what is directly around us, seeing only what is in our own microcosm. Sometimes, however, when we are clear of mind and take a step back, we see that the world is far different then we thought. Toby Ng Design has created a superb series of posters that cleverly help us get an overview of how the world really appears. The 20 poster collection, titled ‘The World of 100’ is available for purchase at toby-ng.com Source: brainpickings.org People's Climate March: thousands demand action around the world - as it happened Emma Thompson, who has recently returned from a trip to the Arctic with Greenpeace, has been talking to Andrew Marr on the BBC. Marr asks what concerns her most about climate change. “I’ll tell you exactly what it was, it’s the water marks left by the glacial mess the sides of the valleys where they were once great... You forget that glaciers retreat but they also lose mass,” she says.

Floods, forest fires, expanding deserts: the future has arrived Climate change is no longer viewed by mainstream scientists as a future threat to our planet and our species. It is a palpable phenomenon that already affects the world, they insist. And a brief look round the globe certainly provides no lack of evidence to support this gloomy assertion. In Bangladesh, increasingly severe floods – triggered, in part, by increasing temperatures and rising sea levels – are wiping out crops and destroying homes on a regular basis. In Sudan, the heat is causing the Sahara to expand and to eat into farmland, while in Siberia, the planet's warming is causing the permafrost to melt and houses to subside.

Corbis - XX Century in Black and White Photos BBC Men in Hats Watching the Sky Coco Chanel Robert Kennedy Conversing WithEdward Kennedy Buddhist Monk Committing RitualSuicide Cotton production linked to images of the dried up Aral Sea basin What do the catwalks of Paris have to do with 25,000 miles of exposed sea bed thousands of miles to the east? While all eyes have been fixed on designer collections and members of the front row, the true cost of the fashion industry has been revealed in a shock announcement by NASA that the Aral Sea in Central Asia has now completely dried up. The Aral Sea was once the world’s fourth largest lake, home to 24 species of fish and surrounded by fishing communities, lush forests and wetlands. While the lake was salt water, the rivers that fed it were fresh water.

Satellite images show Aral Sea basin 'completely dried' A large section of the Aral Sea has completely dried up for the first time in modern history, according to Nasa. Images from the US space agency’s Terra satellite released last week show that the eastern basin of the Central Asian inland sea – which stretched across Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan and was once the fourth largest in the world – was totally parched in August. Images taken in 2000 show an extensive body of water covering the same area. “This is the first time the eastern basin has completely dried in modern times,” Philip Micklin, a geographer emeritus from Western Michigan University told Nasa.

Pollution May Be Promoting Lethal Tumors In Turtles Pollution from urban areas and farms in Hawaii may be contributing to a tumor-forming disease in endangered sea turtles, a new study has found. According to the researchers, nitrogen in runoff gets stored in the turtles’ food and consequently gives sleepy herpesviruses the fuel they need to cause the often fatal tumors that have afflicted sea turtle populations for decades. The work has been published in PeerJ.

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