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Can we really trust the Gartner Magic Quadrant? Add to favorites Can we really trust Gartner when their primary goal is to sell research, consultancy and events?

Can we really trust the Gartner Magic Quadrant?

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to the Gartner Magic Quadrant, argues EXASOL CEO Aaron Auld. Run a quick search for Magic Quadrant and you’ll find a huge number of press releases from vendors telling the world about their latest position. Leader, challenger, visionary or niche; whatever the placing it’s worth a press release. At EXASOL we have been guilty of the same charge – after all recognition from a third party as well-regarded as Gartner is worth shouting about. What is the Magic Quadrant? The term “Magic Quadrant” was first used in public by Gartner in 1994 but its history goes back to the 1980s when it was meant as a quick overview to a market segment. Gartner advises users to take notice of all quadrants, since businesses in every category have their own unique strengths and weaknesses.

Magic Quadrant controversy Even the analysts fall victim to hype. Big data’s power is terrifying. That could be good news for democracy. Will Democracy Survive Big Data and Artificial Intelligence? Editor’s Note: This article first appeared in Spektrum der Wissenschaft, Scientific American’s sister publication, as “Digitale Demokratie statt Datendiktatur.”

Will Democracy Survive Big Data and Artificial Intelligence?

“Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-imposed immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one’s understanding without guidance from another.” —Immanuel Kant, “What is Enlightenment?” (1784) The digital revolution is in full swing. Everything will become intelligent; soon we will not only have smart phones, but also smart homes, smart factories and smart cities. The field of artificial intelligence is, indeed, making breathtaking advances.

It can be expected that supercomputers will soon surpass human capabilities in almost all areas—somewhere between 2020 and 2060. One thing is clear: the way in which we organize the economy and society will change fundamentally. How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next. In theory, statistics should help settle arguments.

How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next

They ought to provide stable reference points that everyone – no matter what their politics – can agree on. Yet in recent years, divergent levels of trust in statistics has become one of the key schisms that have opened up in western liberal democracies. Shortly before the November presidential election, a study in the US discovered that 68% of Trump supporters distrusted the economic data published by the federal government. In the UK, a research project by Cambridge University and YouGov looking at conspiracy theories discovered that 55% of the population believes that the government “is hiding the truth about the number of immigrants living here”. Rather than diffusing controversy and polarisation, it seems as if statistics are actually stoking them.

Data Humanism, the Revolution will be Visualized. – giorgia lupi – Medium. A dataset might lead to many stories.

Data Humanism, the Revolution will be Visualized. – giorgia lupi – Medium

Rethinking Informed Consent in the Digital Age. November 2, 2016 by Linda Raftree This post is co-authored by Emily Tomkys, Oxfam GB; Danna Ingleton, Amnesty International; and me (Linda Raftree, Independent) At the MERL Tech conference in DC this month, we ran a breakout session on rethinking consent in the digital age.

Rethinking Informed Consent in the Digital Age

Most INGOs have not updated their consent forms and policies for many years, yet the growing use of technology in our work, for many different purposes, raises many questions and insecurities that are difficult to address. Our old ways of requesting and managing consent need to be modernized to meet the new realities of digital data and the changing nature of data. Is informed consent even possible when data is digital and/or opened? Developing and operationalizing Responsible Data Policies. This post was written with input from Maliha Khan, Independent Consultant; Emily Tomkys, Oxfam GB; Siobhan Green, Sonjara and Zara Rahman, The Engine Room.

Developing and operationalizing Responsible Data Policies

A friend reminded me earlier this month at the MERL Tech Conference that a few years ago when we brought up the need for greater attention to privacy, security and ethics when using ICTs and digital data in humanitarian and development contexts, people pointed us to Tor, encryption and specialized apps. Rethinking Informed Consent in the Digital Age.

Artificial Intelligence’s White Guy Problem. Council for Big Data, Ethics, and Society. Seeing the Error of Your Ways. There’s an owl in there somewhere.

Seeing the Error of Your Ways

No, really. How Information Graphics Reveal Your Brain’s Blind Spots Chances are, you probably think your mind works pretty well. It might lead you astray now and then, but usually it helps you make good decisions and remember things reliably. At the very least, you’re probably confident that it doesn’t change depending on the time of day or what you had to eat. To scrape or not to scrape: technical and ethical challenges of collecting data off the web. Sophie Chou is a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab focusing on machine learning and journalism.

To scrape or not to scrape: technical and ethical challenges of collecting data off the web

She attended a session on web scraping at the 2016 NICAR conference. The Internet is a smorgasbord of information and, with some basic coding skills in a programming language like Python, it can be tempting to collect everything interesting that you see. The Trials and Tribulations of Data Visualization for Good.