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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare (/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/;[1] 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[nb 1] was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2] He is often called England's national poet, and the "Bard of Avon".[3][nb 2] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 38 plays,[nb 3] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[4] Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.[6][nb 4] His early plays were primarily comedies and histories, which are regarded as some of the best work ever produced in these genres. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. Life Early life London and theatrical career Later years and death man Plays

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shakespeare

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Shakespeare's The Tempest 'was intended as a musical' Jonathan Holmes, the artistic director of Jericho House, also said Shakespeare should have shared credit for the play with Robert Johnson, a composer and lute player. In a two-year research project, Mr Holmes claims to have unearthed proof that the playwright worked with Johnson as equals on the play, which was penned in 1610 and 1611 and is believed to the last work that Shakespeare wrote alone. The Tempest tells the story of a Prospero, the exiled Duke of Milan, and his attempts to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful position, using illusion and skilful manipulation.

Shakespeare Facts: 50 Interesting Facts About William Shakespeare Interested in Shakespeare facts? Below is a range of 50 little known facts about William Shakespeare. Bear in mind that very little in the way of hard facts is actually known about Shakespeare’s life (unlike facts about Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, which are fairly well documented), but we’ve researched long and hard to come up with a range of interesting facts about the great man: Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. In 1962, a year before his death, he was elected Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature.[1]

Hamlet Hamlet is Shakespeare's longest play and among the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature, with a story capable of "seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others."[1] The play seems to have been one of Shakespeare's most popular works during his lifetime[2] and still ranks among his most-performed, topping the performance list of the Royal Shakespeare Company and its predecessors in Stratford-upon-Avon since 1879.[3] It has inspired writers from Goethe and Dickens to Joyce and Murdoch, and has been described as "the world's most filmed story after Cinderella".[4] Characters[edit] Plot[edit]

An Abundance of Katherines An appendix explaining some of the more complex equations Colin uses throughout the story was written by Daniel Biss, a close friend to Green. Following the announcement of the name of his latest book, The Fault in Our Stars, after which John Green's fans made hundreds of book covers, Penguin announced a contest in which they would allow the fans (known as "nerdfighters") to design the new cover of An Abundance of Katherines. Plot summary[edit] Colin Singleton is an anagram-loving seventeen-year-old boy who has become depressed because though he has maintained his status of a prodigy, he has not yet become a “genius.” He wishes to accomplish this goal by having a Eureka moment. As well as not being the genius he hopes to be, his girlfriend, Katherine XIX, recently dumped him (over the span of his life, Colin has dated nineteen girls named Katherine, all spelled in that manner).

William Shakespeare, the 'king of infinite space’ Shakespeare had multiple connections to the Digges family. For a time they lived a few hundred yards apart in London, and Digges’s son, Leonard, was a fan of the playwright and contributed an introductory verse to the First Folio. Other science-minded Englishmen were flourishing in Shakespeare’s time. There was Thomas Harriot, for example, who aimed a telescope at the night sky several months before Galileo. And John Dee, who was something like a science adviser to Queen Elizabeth (and who has been suggested as the model for Prospero in The Tempest). The Italian philosopher and mystic Giordano Bruno travelled to England in the 1580s lecturing on Copernicanism.

Brave New World In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World fifth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[1] In 2003, Robert McCrum writing for The Observer included Brave New World chronologically at number 53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time",[2] and the novel was listed at number 87 on the BBC's survey The Big Read.[3] Title[edit] O wonder! How many godly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in't. Romeo and Juliet An 1870 oil painting by Ford Madox Brown depicting Romeo and Juliet's famous balcony scene Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays.

The Fault in Our Stars Plot[edit] Hazel explains the magnificence of An Imperial Affliction: It is a novel about a girl named Anna who has cancer, and it's the only account she's read of living with cancer that matches her experience. She describes how the novel maddeningly ends midsentence, denying the reader closure about the fate of the novel’s characters. She speculates about the novel’s mysterious author, Peter Van Houten, who fled to Amsterdam after the novel was published and hasn’t been heard from since. A week after Hazel and Augustus discuss the literary meaning of An Imperial Affliction, Augustus miraculously reveals he tracked down Van Houten's assistant, Lidewij, and through her he's managed to start an email correspondence with the reclusive author.

The Faerie Queene The Faerie Queene is an incomplete English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. The first half was published in 1590, and a second installment was published in 1596. The Faerie Queene is notable for its form: it was the first work written in Spenserian stanza and is one of the longest poems in the English language. It is an allegorical work, and can be read (as Spenser presumably intended) on several levels of allegory, including as praise of Queen Elizabeth I. Shakespeare in American Communities Shakespeare lived during a remarkable period of English history, a time of relative political stability that followed and preceded eras of extensive upheaval. Elizabeth I became the Queen of England in 1558, six years before Shakespeare's birth. During her 45-year reign, London became a cultural and commercial center where learning and literature thrived. When Queen Elizabeth ascended to the throne, there were violent clashes throughout Europe between Protestant and Catholic leaders and their followers. Though Elizabeth honored many of the Protestant edicts of her late father, King Henry VIII, she made significant concessions to Catholic sympathizers, which kept them from attempting rebellion.

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