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The Life of William Shakespeare

The Life of William Shakespeare
Related:  Romeo and Juliet

Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. For many English-speakers, the following phrases are familiar enough to be considered common expressions, proverbs, and/or clichés. I compiled these from multiple sources online in 2003. How many of these are true coinages by "the Bard", and how many are simply the earliest written attestations of a word or words already in use, I can't tell you. A few words are first attested in Shakespeare and seem to have caused extra problems for the typesetters. The popular book Coined by Shakespeare acknowledges that it is presenting first attestations rather than certain inventions. Words like "anchovy", "bandit", and "zany" are just first attestations of loan-words. Right now I'm in the process of referencing these. scalpel_blade@yahoo.com

96 Incredibly Useful Links for Teaching and Studying Shakespeare The idea of tackling Shakespeare in school has sometimes sent chills down both students’ and teachers’ spines, but the truth is that studying Shakespeare doesn’t have to be so daunting. His plays and sonnets are filled with themes that are relevant even today, are humorous, lyrical, and provide important historical content. Most importantly, Shakespeare knew how to tell a good story. Whether you are teaching or learning Shakespeare in a traditional classroom, in an online course, in high school, or college, there are resources below that will make teaching and learning about Shakespeare and fun and engaging experience. Comprehensive Resources These resources offer a wealth of information about Shakespeare and his works. Shakespeare Online. Reading Shakespeare Use these links to find full online texts, modern translations, searchable text, and more. No Fear Shakespeare. Articles Types of Female Characters in Shakespeare. Quizzes Find out how much you know about Shakespeare with these quizzes.

Shakespeare for teens By being intimidated by the multilevel narrative and the stylised language we are missing out on some exceptional teaching materials. By depriving our EFL teens of Shakespeare we are depriving them of some of the most riveting, contemporary stories ever to be told in the English language. In your EFL classroom don’t skip it – exploit it! Why teach Shakespeare? Why teach Shakespeare? The fantastic stories.His plays are crammed with stimulating plots and sub-plots. What should I teach? Plays that motivate and excite youIf you know and love a play then you are already better equipped to sell it to your teenage audience.Plays on exam listsThe plays for 2008 are The Tempest, Richard III and Much Ado about Nothing. How can I teach Shakespeare? Emphasize the story firstThe story should always be the focal point of the lesson. ConclusionTeaching Shakespeare in an EFL class is definitely not a time-filling activity: it requires preparation and dedication. Jo Bertrand, Paris

Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath The Hip-hop Shakespeare Company is a music theatre production company founded by MOBO-award winning hip-hop artist Kingslee “Akala” Daley, 25. Based in London, THSC offers young people a different view of the arts and ultimately themselves. Through our education programmes, live music events and music theatre productions we engage young people, particularly those who are considered “hard to reach” and push them toward artistic excellence. By bridging music, theatre and performing arts in non-conventional venues we also strive to alter the perceptions of audiences of all ages, creating the ultimate entertainment experience via literature and the arts across the UK and beyond. Sarah Swann loves to insult her students - just as long as it is in the words of the Bard. Shake it up with some of your own Shakespearean insults.

Absolute Shakespeare - plays, quotes, summaries, essays... Shakespeare's Globe Globe Theatre Links | Home (picture credit: Utrecht University Library) The sketch at left is perhaps one of the most important in theatrical history. In 1596, a Dutch student by the name of Johannes de Witt attended a play in London at the Swan Theatre. Shakespeare's company erected the storied Globe Theatre circa 1599 in London's Bankside district. The story of the original Globe's construction might be worthy of a Shakespearean play of its own. Unfortunately, their aristocratic neighbors complained to the Privy Council about the plans for Blackfriars. In late December of 1598, Allen left London for the countryside. The endeavor was not without controversy. In 1613, the original Globe Theatre burned to the ground when a cannon shot during a performance of Henry VIII ignited the thatched roof of the gallery. The foundations of the Globe were rediscovered in 1989, rekindling interest in a fitful attempt to erect a modern version of the amphitheater. Globe Links Shakespeare's Globe

Romeo and Juliet Comic [Grammarman Home] [Romeo and Juliet Menu] [Next Page] Jump to page: [1] [2] [3] [4][5] [6] [7] [8] Romeo and Juliet Character Map Elizabethan Theater - Shakespeare Fun Facts Acting was not a highly paid or highly respected profession. Actors were seen as vagrant troublemakers who promoted hard living and sin. In the 16th century, actors traveled from town to town on a cart, looking for audiences to pay to watch them perform. Playhouses were not constructed in London until 1576. Because acting was not a respected profession, women were not allowed to act until after 1660. Going to the theater was not considered to be a fancy affair. Poor people called the groundlings, or penny knaves, were famous their love of plays. Going to a play was a lively event. The most expensive seats in a theater were the in the top row of the theater, farthest from the audience. People expected to see a new play everyday in theaters. Most plays were seen at two o'clock in the afternoon.

Baz Luhrmann's "Romeo + Juliet" compared with Shakespeare's Original Work Baz Luhrmann’s kaleidoscopic film adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, while often leaving much to be desired from the two main actors in the way of delivery, presents a fascinating modern interpretation of the 16th century drama. David Ansen, film critic, describes it as “alternately enrapturing and exhausting, brilliant and glib…a "Romeo and Juliet" more for the eyes than the ears” (Newsweek). Sir Philip Sidney states in his Apology for Poetry that poetry should both delight and teach, and both the text and the film serve this purpose well—each suited to the time in which they were presented. Shakespeare incorporated jokes of the time, mentions of royalty, and allusions to historical events in his plays. A mere glance at the film will show anyone with even the slightest knowledge of the play that the two are ferociously different in terms of setting, costume, casting, music, and props. They continue their repartee until Abraham and another servingman of the Montagues arrive. Ansen, David.

www.folgerdigitaltexts.org/?chapter=5&play=Rom&loc=p7 x Folger Digital Texts use the text of Shakespeare's plays from the Folger Shakespeare Library editions. The editions contain the work of Shakespeare on the right-hand pages, and notes, glosses, and illustrations on the left. Folger Digital Texts use the same page numbers as the Folger editions. FTLN stands for Folger Through Line Number. With Folger Through Line Numbers, all of the lines in a play are numbered sequentially, from the first line of a play to the last. Folger Digital Texts is designed to be a mirror of our popular print series, right down to the layout - so no matter whether readers are using Folger Digital Texts, Simon and Schuster’s ebook, or a good old-fashioned print book, everyone can be “on the same page.” Folger Digital Texts is pleased to present the first sixteen plays in our series.

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