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ENGL 339 Home Page English 339: Introduction to ShakespeareFall, 2013 Site Navigation PREREQUISITES: GE area A (esp. expository writing, e.g. ENGL 134, and reasoning, argumentation and writing, e.g. ENGL 145); AND GE area C1 (a 200-level literature class, e.g. ENGL 230 or 231or 251 or 252 or 253). A WRITING-INTENSIVE, G.E. GWR: As a C4 literature class, ENGL 339 may be taken by students wishing to fulfill the Graduate Writing Requirement (GWR). ENGL 339 is designed to introduce both English or Theatre majors and G.E. students to representative plays of all genres by William Shakespeare, perhaps the finest poet ever to write in English. REQUIRED TEXTS: The SIGNET CLASSICS editions of A Midsummer Night's Dream; Henry V; Macbeth; Hamlet; and The Tempest. NOTE: As You Like It has been dropped from the class this quarter due to the necessity of scheduling a video screening of a film available only on VHS during class time. For some ideas, click here to access the list of W12 speeches/scenes.

Open Source Shakespeare: search Shakespeare's works, read the texts New Thought Library, Free Books, Free Texts, Free Public Library of New Thought Metaphysical Spiritual Books - Join us in making New Thought Free Forever Join the Team! Our "Be The Change" Volunteer program is fun and a valuable experience. You will learn web technologies through hands on experience helping make more texts available to the world. Apply Now! Volunteers can earn certification and qualification in New Thought Library Science. Celebration is an important part of our lives. more... Spiritual & Emotional Healing For as long as we have been on this wonderful earth, Humans have had thoughts and feelings. more... Personal Empowerment New Thought has been around for quite some time. You can take wonderful New Thought classes from a variety of New Thought teachers from around the globe, both independent and from different New Thought denominations. more... We Serve Public Domain works (currently those published before 1944) and New Works by Contemporary New Thought Authors that have registered into our promotional program and given us permission to publish their works. more... We provide New Thought books for Free! Join us! --Mr.

Absolute Shakespeare - plays, quotes, summaries, essays... Enjoying "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare Enjoying "Macbeth", by William Shakespeare by Ed Friedlander, M.D.erf@kcumb.edu This Is NOT "Family Entertainment." Young people who know of Shakespeare from "Shakespeare Gardens" and "Beautiful Tales for Children" may be surprised by what happens in Macbeth. The Real Macbeth and His Times Shakespeare got his story from Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles. I've read that Holinshed's section on Macbeth was largely derived from the work of one Hector Boece, Scotorum Historiae ("Chronicles of Scotland", 1526-7, translated from Latin into English by a John Bellenden in 1535). It is evidently not online. Here's what we think really happened with Macbeth and the other characters. In a barbaric era, population pressures made war and even the slaughter of one community by another a fact of life. The name "Macbeth" means "son of life", and is a Christian name rather than a patronymic (hence the "b" is lower case.) The historical Mrs. Macbeth allied with Thorfinn of Orkney, a Norseman. Mr. The Background

Essential knowledge and literary terms for understanding Shakespeare. An Award winning You - you- your- your formal and distant form of address suggesting respect for a superior or courtesy to a social equal. Thou - thee - thy - thine informal and close form and can imply either closeness or contempt. Gertrude: Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended. Hamlet: Mother, you have my father much offended. "Ye/you" or "thou/thee" sometimes show social classes, too. Falstaff: Dost thou hear, hostess? It can be insulting if it was used by an inferior to address a superior social rank.

RMC - Collections > Rare Book & Manuscript Collections > European History & Culture > The Rhaeto-Romance Collection The Rhaeto-Romance Collection, like the Fiske Icelandic Collection and the Dante and Petrarch collections, is a bequest of Daniel Willard Fiske, Cornell's first university librarian and a singularly energetic book collector. The term Rhaeto-Romance describes a group of closely related dialects rather than a coalesced, national language. The dialect caught the interest of Willard Fiske while he was on an expedition to the baths of Tarasp in the Lower Engadine. A chance sighting of texts in the Rhaeto-Romance language led to several purchasing excursions throughout the Alpine valleys of Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Italy, with the result that in "little more than five weeks," the collection as it has come to Cornell was virtually complete. The printed catalogue of the Rhaeto-Romance collection divides the holdings into Literature (including numerous religious works), History, Philology and Description. Related Online Resources The Rheato-Romance Collection

Romeo & Juliet Using this Guide List of other study guides The notes were prepared for use with an edition of Romeo and Juliet bound together with the book for West Side Story and in conjunction with a showing of Franco Zeffirelli's film version of the play, but they will be useful with any edition or production. The introduction focuses primarily on comparisons with West Side Story, so it has relatively little to say about the play as such. As noted, this is often regarded as a lesser Shakespeare tragedy by scholars, but what should also be kept in mind is that audiences have made it one of the most beloved plays of all time from the Elizabethan Age to the present. Although Shakespeare's dialogue often reads beautifully enough on the page, please keep in mind that he never intended his words to be read. Shakespeare wrote almost no original plots. Italian cities were infamous for their long-lasting, deadly feuds between prominent families. Prologue Act I: Scene 1 Act I: Scene 2 Act I: Scene 3

Romeo and Juliet Want more deets? We've also got a complete Online Course about Romeo and Juliet, with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff. Before young William Shakespeare wrote his play about two poetry speaking, hormone-driven teenagers who defy their families' long-standing feud and risk everything to be together, love wasn't even considered a suitable subject for a "tragedy." Not anymore. Shakespeare adapted the storyline from Arthur Brookes' popular Tragicall History of Romeus and Juliet (1562), a long English poem based on a story that dates back to a novella by Masuccio Salernitano called "Mariotto and Giannozza" (1476). Despite its fancy pedigree, Romeo and Juliet is also considered to be one of Shakespeare's most accessible works. It's also one of the most adapted plays of all time—Franco Zeffirelli made it into an Oscar winning film in 1968 and the play was also adapted into a Tony Award winning musical, West Side Story (1957). Why? Our point?

Romeo: courtly lover Courtly lover and madman Commentary Table of Contents | Next page On this page: Introduction Partly because you will be thoroughly familiar with the main line of the plot of Romeo and Juliet, I am going to start my discussion of the play by beating about the bush: I will ask you to look at Romeo before he meets Juliet; at the brilliant but eccentric speech of Mercutio on Queen Mab; at Romeo and Juliet as tragedy; and at some of the many colourful minor characters in the play--then to look again at Romeo and Juliet themselves. Look with some care at the dialogue between Benvolio and Romeo, 1. 1. lines 163-241. Look especially at the near-comic juxtaposition of ideas in lines 174-8, just before Romeo's first apostrophe to Love. Look ahead to the next scene with Romeo (still before he has met Juliet), 1. 2, particularly lines 91-6 where he speaks again in response to Benvolio. Think of Orlando in the first three acts of As You Like It, even perhaps Claudio in Much Ado About Nothing.

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