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Shakespeare Navigators

Shakespeare Navigators
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ENGL 339 Home Page English 339: Introduction to ShakespeareFall, 2013 Site Navigation PREREQUISITES: GE area A (esp. expository writing, e.g. ENGL 134, and reasoning, argumentation and writing, e.g. ENGL 145); AND GE area C1 (a 200-level literature class, e.g. ENGL 230 or 231or 251 or 252 or 253). A WRITING-INTENSIVE, G.E. GWR: As a C4 literature class, ENGL 339 may be taken by students wishing to fulfill the Graduate Writing Requirement (GWR). ENGL 339 is designed to introduce both English or Theatre majors and G.E. students to representative plays of all genres by William Shakespeare, perhaps the finest poet ever to write in English. REQUIRED TEXTS: The SIGNET CLASSICS editions of A Midsummer Night's Dream; Henry V; Macbeth; Hamlet; and The Tempest. NOTE: As You Like It has been dropped from the class this quarter due to the necessity of scheduling a video screening of a film available only on VHS during class time. For some ideas, click here to access the list of W12 speeches/scenes.

All the World's a Stage by William Shakespeare All the world's a stage,And all the men and women merely players;They have their exits and their entrances,And one man in his time plays many parts,His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchelAnd shining morning face, creeping like snailUnwillingly to school. And then the lover,Sighing like furnace, with a woeful balladMade to his mistress' eyebrow. Project Gutenberg On August 26 2020, the Project Gutenberg website underwent some major changes. These changes had been previewed since early 2020, and visitors to the old site were invited to try the new site, including giving input via a brief survey. The old site is no longer available. If you found yourself on this page unexpectedly, it is because an old page was redirected here. Please use the navigation menus at the top of the page to find what you were looking for. All of the functionality, and most of the content, from the old site is still here - but in a different location. Below, find a description of the motivation behind the changes. THANK YOU for your patience as we continue to update the website to fix remaining problems, and maintain all the functionality and content that visitors expect. Known issues and “TO DO” items Updates on fixed items Let us know if you are still having trouble with these: OPDS: Issues resolved Kindle: Issues resolved Bookshelf detailed listings: Issues resolved Goals

WriteWorld Absolute Shakespeare - plays, quotes, summaries, essays... Open Source Shakespeare: search Shakespeare's works, read the texts All the world's a stage "All the world's a stage" is the phrase that begins a monologue from William Shakespeare's As You Like It, spoken by the melancholy Jaques in Act II Scene VII. The speech compares the world to a stage and life to a play, and catalogues the seven stages of a man's life, sometimes referred to as the seven ages of man:[1] infant, schoolboy, lover, soldier, justice, pantaloon, and old age, facing imminent death. It is one of Shakespeare's most frequently-quoted passages, and is mistakenly believed by some to be Shakespeare's last speech. In the prior work The Merchant of Venice Shakespeare had described the world as "A stage where every man must play a part". The seven ages[edit] The man in the poem goes through these stages all expressed in a sardonic when not bitter tone: Infancy: In this stage he is a helpless baby and knows little.Whining schoolboy: It is in that stage of life that he begins to go to school. Origins[edit] "I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano; And mine a sad one."

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Study tips & skills Study Tips & Study Skills Students with better study methods and strategies score higher on their exams. Everyone is different. Different methods work for different people; the following are only suggestions on improving upon your current studying techniques. It is best to review the material right after class when it's still fresh in your memory. Don't try to do all your studying the night before the test. Have all of your study material in front of you: lecture notes, course textbooks, study guides and any other relevant material. Find a comfortable and quiet place to study with good lighting and little distractions (try avoiding your own bed; it is very tempting to just lie down and take a nap). Start out by studying the most important information. Learn the general concepts first, don't worry about learning the details until you have learned the main ideas. Take notes and write down a summary of the important ideas as you read through your study material. Take short breaks frequently.

Enjoying "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare Enjoying "Macbeth", by William Shakespeare by Ed Friedlander, M.D.erf@kcumb.edu This Is NOT "Family Entertainment." Young people who know of Shakespeare from "Shakespeare Gardens" and "Beautiful Tales for Children" may be surprised by what happens in Macbeth. The Real Macbeth and His Times Shakespeare got his story from Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles. I've read that Holinshed's section on Macbeth was largely derived from the work of one Hector Boece, Scotorum Historiae ("Chronicles of Scotland", 1526-7, translated from Latin into English by a John Bellenden in 1535). It is evidently not online. Here's what we think really happened with Macbeth and the other characters. In a barbaric era, population pressures made war and even the slaughter of one community by another a fact of life. The name "Macbeth" means "son of life", and is a Christian name rather than a patronymic (hence the "b" is lower case.) The historical Mrs. Macbeth allied with Thorfinn of Orkney, a Norseman. Mr. The Background

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