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Romeo and Juliet

No Fear Shakespeare puts Shakespeare's language side-by-side with a facing-page translation into modern English—the kind of English people actually speak today. Table of Contents Characters Prologue Prologue Act 1 Act 1, Scene 1 Act 1, Scene 2 Act 1, Scene 3 Act 1, Scene 4 Act 1, Scene 5 Act 2 Act 2, Prologue Act 2, Scene 1 Act 2, Scene 2 Act 2, Scene 3 Act 2, Scene 4 Act 2, Scene 5 Act 2, Scene 6 Act 3 Act 3, Scene 1 Act 3, Scene 2 Act 3, Scene 3 Act 3, Scene 4 Act 3, Scene 5 Act 4 Act 4, Scene 1 Act 4, Scene 2 Act 4, Scene 3 Act 4, Scene 4 Act 4, Scene 5 Act 5 Act 5, Scene 1 Act 5, Scene 2 Act 5, Scene 3 How to Cite No Fear Romeo and Juliet

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How to make Shakespeare easy for English language learners Have you ever had difficulty relating Shakespeare to learners of English? Tutor and resource writer Genevieve White comes to the rescue, in time for Shakespeare Day and English Language Day today. Last year, I wrote an article extolling the joys of teaching Shakespeare to learners of English and outlining the reasons why teachers should bring the Bard into the classroom. Some of the comments I received on this post suggested that the linguistic challenges presented by sixteenth-century English are just too great to overcome. It is true that Shakespeare’s texts may present difficulties for contemporary readers, particularly those who do not have English as a first language.

Full synopsis Romeo and Juliet was written in 1595-6 and is set in Verona, Italy, at a time when a longstanding feud between two noble families - the Montagues and the Capulets - constantly breaks out into brawling on the streets. Prince Escalus, ruler of Verona, threatens terrible punishment on anyone who takes part in further violence. Young Romeo Montague is hopelessly in love with the unattainable Rosaline and, in an attempt to cure his lovesick misery, his friends persuade him to go disguised to a party at the home of his family's sworn enemies, the Capulets. Romeo reluctantly agrees to go when he learns that Rosaline has been invited. At the party, he meets Juliet, only daughter of the Capulets, and not even knowing each other's names, they fall instantly in love. Juliet's hot-headed cousin, Tybalt, has spotted Romeo and his friends but is prevented from challenging them by her father, Old Capulet.

Romeo and Juliet Want more deets? We've also got a complete Online Course about Romeo and Juliet, with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff. Before young William Shakespeare wrote his play about two poetry speaking, hormone-driven teenagers who defy their families' long-standing feud and risk everything to be together, love wasn't even considered a suitable subject for a "tragedy." 7 Types of English Adjectives That Every ESL Student Must Know “My cat had each of these four adorable kittens.” If you removed all the adjectives from this sentence, what would you be left with? “Cat had kittens.” Shakespeare's Sonnets All the sonnets are provided here, with descriptive commentary attached to each one, giving explanations of difficult and unfamiliar words and phrases, and with a full analysis of any special problems of interpretation which arise. Sonnets by other Elizabethan poets are also included, Spenser, Sidney, Drayton and a few other minor authors. The poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt are also given, with both old and modern spelling versions, and with brief notes provided. Check the menu on the left for full details of what is available. The web site has been changed to a new responsive design, which should work with tablets and phones. Please let me know if there are any problems with the new site (email address below).

William Shakespeare Biography Who Was William Shakespeare? William Shakespeare (baptized on April 26, 1564 to April 23, 1616) was an English playwright, actor and poet and is often called England’s national poet. Born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, he was an important member of the Lord Chamberlain’s Men company of theatrical players from roughly 1594 onward. Written records give little indication of the way in which Shakespeare’s professional life molded his artistry. Strategic reading » LessonSense.com What is Strategic Reading? Reading is a process of constructing meaning by interacting with text; as individuals read, they use their prior knowledge along with clues from the text to construct meaning. Research indicates that effective or expert readers are strategic (Baker & Brown, 1984a, 1984b). This means that they have purposes for their reading and adjust their reading to each purpose and for each reading task. Strategic readers use a variety of strategies and skills as they construct meaning (Paris, Wasik, & Turner, 1991).

Black Death - Facts & Summary Today, scientists understand that the Black Death, now known as the plague, is spread by a bacillus called Yersina pestis. (The French biologist Alexandre Yersin discovered this germ at the end of the 19th century.) They know that the bacillus travels from person to person pneumonically, or through the air, as well as through the bite of infected fleas and rats.

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare te hell, all Montagues, and thee: Have at thee, coward! [They fight.] [Enter several of both Houses, who join the fray; then enter Citizens with clubs.] 1 Citizen. Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! The Shakespeare family saga The story of Shakespeare’s family – one of upward social mobility – is reflected in their homes. Start in the small village of Wilmcote, three miles north of Stratford-upon-Avon, where the playwright’s mother, Mary Arden, grew up in a small farmhouse built around 1514 by her father, Robert. Mary was the youngest of eight daughters by his first wife; his second, Agnes Hill, brought with her two sons and two daughters. When Robert made his will in 1556, he named young Mary as one of his two executors and left her a substantial amount of land and money, which suggests that she was a woman of exceptional ability. Mary married the up-and-coming glover (and later wool dealer and money-lender) John Shakespeare, probably in 1557.

Enjoying "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare Enjoying "Macbeth", by William Shakespeare by Ed Friedlander, M.D.erf@kcumb.edu This Is NOT "Family Entertainment." Young people who know of Shakespeare from "Shakespeare Gardens" and "Beautiful Tales for Children" may be surprised by what happens in Macbeth.

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