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-Folger Shakespeare Library

-Folger Shakespeare Library

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PennSound Peter Jaeger Performed by the Yehudi Menuhin Music School, 2016 Posted 2/23/2017 Here's is the latest addition to our author page for poet and critic Peter Jaeger to get your toes tapping for the coming weekend. Daniel Penny, winner of the BBC's young composer of the year award in 2015, set Peter Jaeger's poem "Sub Twang Mustard" to music. It's the Same Old Story Note: This lesson was originally published on an older version of The Learning Network; the link to the related Times article will take you to a page on the old site. Overview of Lesson Plan: In this lesson, students consider story elements that are common to both popular storytelling genres and classic literature and then, inspired by the popularity of the “Twilight” book series and movie, they create marketing materials intended to “sell” classic literary works to teenagers. Author(s): Holly Epstein Ojalvo, The New York Times Learning Network

Association for the Study of Esotericism » What is Esotericism? The word “esoteric” derives from the Greek esoterikos, and is a comparative form of eso, meaning “within.” Its first known mention in Greek is in Lucian’s ascription to Aristotle of having “esoteric” [inner] and “exoteric” [outer] teachings. The word later came to designate the secret doctrines said to have been taught by Pythagoras to a select group of disciples, and, in general, to any teachings designed for or appropriate to an inner circle of disciples or initiates. In this sense, the word was brought into English in 1655 by Stanley in his History of Philosophy. Esotericism in Academia Esotericism, as an academic field, refers to the study of alternative or marginalized religious movements or philosophies whose proponents in general distinguish their own beliefs, practices, and experiences from public, institutionalized religious traditions.

Breaking the Masonic Code of SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS Breaking the Masonic Code of SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS By Richard Allan WagnerCopyright © 2013 Hopefully you, the reader, have come into this discourse as a reasonable and unbiased individual—a seeker of Truth. If you’re not already aware, there exists much controversy and debate over who actually wrote the works attributed to the highly mysterious author known as “William Shakespeare”. Yes, the vast majority of people on the planet have generally (and unknowingly) accepted the premise that a man named “William Shakespeare” (of Stratford) wrote the literary works attributed to him. The problem rests with the fact that there is scarce evidence of the Stratford man’s existence—but more importantly, there is NO TANGIBLE EVIDENCE the “Stratford man” wrote the literary body of work for which he is given credit—in fact, there is a mountain of hard, legitimate evidence to the contrary!

Brief Timeline of American Literature and Events, 1620-1920 Brief Timeline of American Literature and Events: Pre-1620 to 1920 This timeline provides a short chronology of events in American history and literature. It is linked to course pages and bibliographies as well as to a set of more general linked resources: pages on American authors, literary movements, and American literature sites. King Lear from ShakespeareMag.com The tragedy King Lear is one of William Shakespeare's most acclaimed plays. Many have gone as far as to affirm that it is simply not possible to write a tragedy that surpasses the depth and transcendence that characterise King Lear. It is believed that the play was written at the beginning of the 17th century, most likely between 1603 and 1606. Shakespeare also wrote a theatrical adaptation of this play around 1623. It is likely that Shakespeare drew some inspiration from mythical figures like the Leir of Britain, whose legend was popular as far back as the 8th century.

Shaking Up Shakespeare: Reaching the Shakespeare-Averse With Adaptations Sara Krulwich/The New York TimesCondola Rashad and Orlando Bloom in “Romeo and Juliet.” Go to related article » Overview | Why study Shakespeare? What role can his work play in teaching us about ourselves in the 21st century?

History of the Royal Society The story of the Royal Society is the story of modern science. Our origins lie in a 1660 ‘invisible college’ of natural philosophers and physicians. Today we are the UK’s national science academy and a Fellowship of some 1,600 of the world’s most eminent scientists. Nullius in verba The very first ‘learned society’ meeting on 28 November 1660 followed a lecture at Gresham College by Christopher Wren. Joined by other leading polymaths including Robert Boyle and John Wilkins, the group soon received royal approval, and from 1663 it would be known as 'The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge'.

world renowned collection of Shakespeare materials offers a number of online resources for teachers and students including a biography of William Shakespeare, introductions to each of the plays and poems, an extensive archive of lessons plans on the plays, and podcasts and videos about teaching and performing the plays. by nda_librarian Apr 30

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