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Millennials

Millennials
Terminology[edit] Authors William Strauss and Neil Howe wrote about the Millennials in Generations: The History of America's Future, 1584 to 2069,[2] and they released an entire book devoted to them, titled Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation.[3] Strauss and Howe are "widely credited with naming the Millennials" according to journalist Bruce Horovitz.[1] In 1987, they coined the term "around the time 1982-born children were entering preschool and the media were first identifying their prospective link to the millennial year 2000".[4] Strauss and Howe use 1982 as the Millennials' starting birth year and 2004 as the last birth year.[5] Newsweek used the term Generation 9/11 to refer to young people who were between the ages of 10 and 20 years on 11 September 2001. The first reference to "Generation 9/11" was made in the cover story of the November 12, 2001 issue of Newsweek.[17] Traits[edit] William A. Political views compared to other generations[edit] Demographics in the U.S.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennials

Related:  wikipedia.org and pagesCPGMillennials

Senior citizen Senior citizen is a common euphemism for an elderly person in both UK and US English, and it implies or means that the person is retired.[1][2][3][4] This in turn usually implies or in fact means that the person is over the retirement age, which varies according to country. Synonyms include pensioner in UK English and retiree and senior in US English. Some dictionaries describe widespread usage of "senior citizen" for people over the age of 65.[5] "Senior citizen" is replacing the term old-age pensioner traditionally used in UK English.[6] When defined in an official context, senior citizen is often used for legal or policy-related reasons in determining who is eligible for certain benefits available to the age group. It is used in general usage instead of traditional terms such as old person, old-age pensioner, or elderly as a courtesy and to signify continuing relevance of and respect for this population group as "citizens" of society, of senior rank.[7]

Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change This is part of a Pew Research Center series of reports exploring the behaviors, values and opinions of the teens and twenty-somethings that make up the Millennial Generation Executive Summary Generations, like people, have personalities, and Millennials — the American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium — have begun to forge theirs: confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change. They are more ethnically and racially diverse than older adults.

Who Are Millennials Believe that they have equal responsibility of child care Greater millennialbrand love Compared to 19% of non-millennials Nine Shift Nine Shift: Work, Life and Education in the 21st Century (2004), is a non-fiction book about futurism. It is co-authored by William A. Draves and Julie Coates.[1][2] List of ethnic, regional, and folk dances by origin This is a list of ethnic, folk, traditional, regional, or otherwise traditionally associated with a particular ethnicity, dances, grouped by ethnicity, country or region. These dances should also be listed on the general, noncategorized index list of specific dances. Afghanistan[edit] Attan Albania[edit] Aragon[edit]

How the Millennial Generation Works Every generation has its own attitudes, values and even quirks. Consider, for example, how different Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 to 1964) are from their parents' generation. No one disputes that the Boomers largely revolted against the morally conservative upbringing of the previous generation. Consumer Discretionary Definition Explaining Consumer Discretionary Share Video undefined What is 'Consumer Discretionary' Consumer discretionary refers to the sector of the economy that consists of businesses that sell nonessential goods and services.

Generation X Generation X, commonly abbreviated to Gen X, is the generation born after the Western Post–World War II baby boom. Demographers, historians and commentators use beginning birth dates from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. Origin and etymology[edit] Hungarian photographer Robert Capa initially referred to post-World War II youth as "Generation X" Generation Y and learning - Ashridge Ashridge research Research was undertaken in late 2008 to identify the development needs and learning preferences of Generation Y compared to those of previous generations, and to provide recommendations to assist with future learning, teaching and workplace practice. The research questions were: Do young people learn differentlyently from those who were young in the past?Is there something which has specifically impacted Generation Y?What does great learning look like in the future?

Coeliac disease Coeliac disease, also spelled celiac disease, is an autoimmune disorder affecting primarily the small intestine that occurs in people who are genetically predisposed.[1] Classic symptoms include gastrointestinal problems such as chronic diarrhoea, abdominal distention, malabsorption, loss of appetite, and among children failure to grow normally. This often begins between six months and two years of age.[2] Non-classic symptoms are the most common, especially in people older than two years.[3][4][5] There may be mild or absent gastrointestinal symptoms, a wide number of symptoms involving any part of the body, or no obvious symptoms.[2] Coeliac disease was first described in childhood;[3][6] however, it may develop at any age.[2][3] It is associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 1 and thyroiditis, among others.[6] Signs and symptoms[edit] Gastrointestinal[edit] Malabsorption-related[edit]

Related:  Mental Toughness