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Theresienstadt concentration camp

Theresienstadt concentration camp
Coordinates : 50°30′48″N 14°10′1″E  /  50.51333°N 14.16694°E  / 50.51333; 14.16694 The (2005) , also referred to as Theresienstadt Ghetto, [ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] was established by the SS during World War II in the fortress and garrison city of Terezín (German name ), located in what is now the Czech Republic. During World War II it served as a Nazi concentration camp staffed in equal numbers by German Nazi guards and their ethnic Czech collaborators. Tens of thousands of Jews were murdered there and over 150,000 others (including tens of thousands of children) were held there for months or years, before then being sent to their deaths on rail transports to Treblinka and Auschwitz extermination camps in Poland, as well as to smaller camps elsewhere. [ edit ] History The fortress of Terezín was constructed between the years 1780 and 1790 by the orders of the Austrian emperor Joseph II in the north-west region of Bohemia . [ edit ] Command and control authority [ edit ] Used as propaganda tool

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