background preloader

Maker's Schedule, Manager's Schedule

Maker's Schedule, Manager's Schedule
July 2009 One reason programmers dislike meetings so much is that they're on a different type of schedule from other people. Meetings cost them more. There are two types of schedule, which I'll call the manager's schedule and the maker's schedule. The manager's schedule is for bosses. It's embodied in the traditional appointment book, with each day cut into one hour intervals. When you use time that way, it's merely a practical problem to meet with someone. Most powerful people are on the manager's schedule. When you're operating on the maker's schedule, meetings are a disaster. For someone on the maker's schedule, having a meeting is like throwing an exception. I find one meeting can sometimes affect a whole day. Each type of schedule works fine by itself. Our case is an unusual one. I wouldn't be surprised if there start to be more companies like us. How do we manage to advise so many startups on the maker's schedule? Those of us on the maker's schedule are willing to compromise.

http://www.paulgraham.com/makersschedule.html

Related:  TravailFood for thought

How to Do What You Love January 2006 To do something well you have to like it. That idea is not exactly novel. We've got it down to four words: "Do what you love." But it's not enough just to tell people that. Doing what you love is complicated. Cradle-to-cradle design Cradle to Cradle design (also referred to as Cradle to Cradle, C2C, cradle 2 cradle, or regenerative design) is a biomimetic approach to the design of products and systems. It models human industry on nature's processes viewing materials as nutrients circulating in healthy, safe metabolisms. It suggests that industry must protect and enrich ecosystems and nature's biological metabolism while also maintaining a safe, productive technical metabolism for the high-quality use and circulation of organic and technical nutrients.[1] Put simply, it is a holistic economic, industrial and social framework that seeks to create systems that are not only efficient but also essentially waste free.[2] The model in its broadest sense is not limited to industrial design and manufacturing; it can be applied to many aspects of human civilization such as urban environments, buildings, economics and social systems. Introduction[edit] Biological and Technical Cycles

How to Work with Engineers — The Year of the Looking Glass A Cheat Sheet for Designers Once, a long time ago, I was a product manager. Then, I was an engineer. For the past seven years, I’ve been in design. Every single day, I work with people in all of these roles. Every single day, I find new ways to appreciate the responsibilities, challenges, and art behind each of these three pillars of product development.

FREE Interactive Learning OpenCourseware from MIT, UC Berkeley, Harvard, Yale, Stanford, U Houston, USC, UCLA, Khan Academy, NPTEL General description: Language may refer either to the specifically human capacity for acquiring and using complex systems of communication, or to a specific instance of such a system of complex communication. The scientific study of language in any of its senses is called linguistics. The approximately 3,000–6,000 languages that are spoken by humans today are the most salient examples, but natural languages can also be based on visual rather than auditory stimuli, for example in sign languages and written language.

The Art of Decision Making as a Product Manager Product managers have to make many decisions every day, including product prioritization decisions, product design decisions, bug triage decisions, and many more. And the process by which a product manager makes such decisions can result either in an extremely well functioning team dynamic or... quite the opposite. When it works well, the team feels as if the best ideas, regardless of where they came from, get implemented. They know their input will get heard. And they have a clear understanding of how and when decisions will be made. On Self-Promotion You are a shameless self promoter!” he said. I can’t speak to the “shame” part, but for the rest: guilty as charged. Stop Competing to Be the Best - Joan Magretta by Joan Magretta | 12:09 PM November 30, 2011 With Cyber Monday, the tablet wars kicked into full swing. Which one is the best? Is it the iPad?

How to Present Designs — The Year of the Looking Glass No matter how utterly innovative, how pristine and beautiful a design idea is, rarely does it speak for itself when you are still in the middle of the creative process. (How can it? Short of being a complete work, it’s a fragment, a paragraph on its way to a full story.) If you are a designer or PM or architect or writer or anyone who spends most of their time living in a creative whirlwind, talking about design is an essential skill. Do it well, and you might be Don Draper, with the power to leave the room breathless, unified behind a vision that stirs an emotion deep inside your gut. Do it poorly, and you might sentence a promising young idea to an untimely death or fail to gather useful feedback.

Networked Knowledge and Combinatorial Creativity by Maria Popova Why creativity is like LEGO, or what Richard Dawkins has to do with Susan Sontag and Gandhi. In May, I had the pleasure of speaking at the wonderful Creative Mornings free lecture series masterminded by my studiomate Tina of Swiss Miss fame. I spoke about Networked Knowledge and Combinatorial Creativity, something at the heart of Brain Pickings and of increasing importance as we face our present information reality. The talk is now available online — full (approximate) transcript below, enhanced with images and links to all materials referenced in the talk.

First, Let's Fire All the Managers Management is the least efficient activity in your organization. Think of the countless hours that team leaders, department heads, and vice presidents devote to supervising the work of others. Most managers are hardworking; the problem doesn’t lie with them. The inefficiency stems from a top-heavy management model that is both cumbersome and costly. A hierarchy of managers exacts a hefty tax on any organization. 5 Hard Questions to Ask Yourself During a Conflict — The Year of the Looking Glass It happens more often than is polite to admit. A versus B, you against me. We do not agree, so I’m pissed, so I go home and practice that age-old art of Placing the Blame Squarely on the Other Side. 7 Ways Noise Affects Your Health We are surrounded by sound. From coworker chit-chat to the sounds of traffic outside to that tinny trace of music coming from a co-commuter’s earbuds, we often don’t consider the noise that makes up our daily environments. But the truth is that the distant jackhammers, incessant elevator bells and even the whistling and humming of the people around us can have a real effect on our health and wellness. As pioneering noise researcher and environmental psychologist Arline Bronzaft, Ph.D., of the City University of New York has said, noise is in the ear of the beholder. “While the ear picks up the sound waves and sends it to the temporal lobe for interpretation, it’s the higher senses of the brain that determine whether that sound is unwanted, unpleasant or disturbing.” Read on to learn more about how noise affects your well-being.

The Visual Thinking Revolution is Here! We are in the midst of a “Visual Thinking Revolution” and leaders in all types of organizations are embracing visual thinking as a literacy of the future. Source: MBA Career Service Professionals (click to enlarge) This revolution’s “tipping point” came earlier this year at the International Forum for Visual Practitioners annual conference, which drew 100 visual practitioners from across the globe. The panel I moderated with Business Models Inc. CEO Patrick van der Pijl and Doodle Revolution’s Sunni Brown kicked off the conference with an expansive discussion on the future of visual thinking. Captured by three different graphic recorders in real time, we explored 10 significant external forces that are fueling the Visual Thinking Revolution:

Guide to Product Planning: Three Feature Buckets In the spirit of capturing some of the observations that I find myself repeating, I’m adding this one to the mix tonight. Unlike the previous two, this is really a piece of concrete advice for product managers of consumer software or consumer internet products. It’s also a more recent observation that I’ve formulated in the past few years. This advice takes the form of a simple classification framework for the features that you are considering for a product, whether it’s a single “large scale” launch, or a series of product features that are planned out on a roadmap.

Related: