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Andrew Blum: What is the Internet, really?

Andrew Blum: What is the Internet, really?

http://www.ted.com/talks/andrew_blum_what_is_the_internet_really.html

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Transition to a world without oil: Rob Hopkins on TED Global Issues X marks the spot: This week’s TEDx Talks The paradox of finding peace in a war zone, and a way to make aid more effective — by decentralizing it and thus speeding it up. Big brother is watching you shop For the past 20 years, those who say that Big Brother is watching you have tended to focus their attention on bogey men such as the ubiquitous CCTV cameras, the National DNA Database and the US and Chinese governments snooping on emails. More recently, though, it's become clear that governments aren't alone in their interest. Companies, particularly those with big online operations, are building up increasingly sophisticated pictures of their customers - and their model is more Brave New World than 1984.

Brilliant 10: Greg Nielson Shrinks Solar Cells To The Size Of Glitter Greg Nielson pushes a small jar full of rubbing alcohol across his desk at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico. In the jar float shiny solar cells the size of glitter. "If you have panels of these on top of Walmart, you get twice as much power [as conventional photovoltaics] and your costs go down by half," he says. For the past six years, Nielson has worked to dramatically reduce the size of solar cells in order to make them more durable, efficient, and cost-effective. When the Utah native arrived at Sandia in 2004, Nielson was one of the world's leading Greg NielsonAge 38Sandia National Laboratoriesresearchers of optical microelectro-mechanical systems—technology that uses light to drive tiny machines. It was a wrong number in 2005 that led him into solar power.

The Book of Symbols: Carl Jung’s Catalog of the Unconscious by Kirstin Butler Why Sarah Palin identifies with the grizzly bear, or what the unconscious knows but doesn’t reveal. A primary method for making sense of the world is by interpreting its symbols. We decode meaning through images and, often without realizing, are swayed by the power of their attendant associations. A central proponent of this theory, iconic Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Gustaf Jung, made an academic case for it in the now-classic Man and His Symbols, and a much more personal case in The Red Book. Wireless power for the price of a penny? The newspaper-style printing of electronic equipment has led to a cost-effective device that could change the way we interact with everyday objects. For a price of just one penny per unit the device, known as a rectenna, which is presented August 10, in IOP Publishing's journal Nanotechnology, can be placed onto objects such as price tags, logos and signage so that we can read product information on our smartphones with one simple swipe. This type of technology, which is known as near-field communication (NFC), has already been implemented to allow fast money transactions; however, this new device could lead the way to large-scale adoption at a low cost. The rectenna, created by researchers from Sunchon National University and Paru Printed Electronics Research Institute, could be implemented onto everyday objects so that they can harness the power given off by the smartphone's radio waves and send information back to it via printed digital circuits.

Deepermind Table of Contents-George Norwood Home Page March 23,2013 1. Introduction to Deepermind With mind-reading speller, free-for-all conversations that are silent and still Researchers have come up with a device that may enable people who are completely unable to speak or move at all to nevertheless manage unscripted back-and-forth conversation. The key to such silent and still communication is the first real-time, brain-scanning speller, according to the report published online on June 28 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The new technology builds on groundbreaking earlier uses of fMRI brain scans to assess consciousness in people described as being in an unconscious, vegetative state and to enable them to answer yes and no questions. fMRI (or functional magnetic resonance imaging) is typically used for clinical and research purposes to track brain activity by measuring blood flow. The new evidence shows that the answer to that thought question is yes.

Deep Web Intelligence We are finding many different industries are able to capitalize on Data-as-a-Service (DaaS). In this post we’ll uncover how a mining company is using BrightPlanet’s Data-as-a-Service model to monitor the Ebola health outbreak to keep their expatriates informed and out of harm’s way with the use of one dataset. You’ll see what type of data is harvested and how it is enriched to make it usable. Continue reading At BrightPlanet, we receive a number of questions about how BrightPlanet’s technology differs from our biggest competitors. People will commonly see companies like Kapow and Connotate and assume that our technologies are in direct competition.

Aesthetic Consumerism and the Violence of Photography: What Susan Sontag Teaches Us about Visual Culture and the Social Web by Maria Popova “Needing to have reality confirmed and experience enhanced by photographs is an aesthetic consumerism to which everyone is now addicted.” Ever since its invention in 1839, the photographic image and its steady evolution have shaped our experience of reality — from chronicling our changing world and recording its diversity to helping us understand the science of emotion to anchored us to consumer culture. But despite the meteoric rise of photography from a niche curiosity to a mass medium over the past century and a half, there’s something ineffably yet indisputably different about visual culture in the digital age — something at once singular and deeply rooted at the essence of the photographic image itself. In the opening essay, “In Plato’s Cave,” Sontag contextualizes the question of how and why photographs came to grip us so powerfully: Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth.

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