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Keith Barry does brain magic

Keith Barry does brain magic

http://www.ted.com/talks/keith_barry_does_brain_magic.html

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The Dark Side of Oxytocin, the Hormone of Love - Ethnocentrism Yes, you knew there had to be a catch. As oxytocin comes into sharper focus, its social radius of action turns out to have definite limits. The love and trust it promotes are not toward the world in general, just toward a person’s in-group. Norman Doidge: The Neuroplasticity Revolution (An Update) Bio Norman Doidge Norman Doidge, M.D., is a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, researcher, author, essayist and poet. He is on the Research Faculty at Columbia University's Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, in New York, and the University of Toronto's Department of Psychiatry. He is a native of Toronto. Autism and Neuropsychology, by Marisa Marzillo Autism is a lifelong disorder that has become the discussion of many media outlets; it is a disorder that causes abnormal neurological development. It seems that lately autism prevalence is increasing, which is causing a demand for professionals to investigate on what causes autism. Autism disorder is characterized by different behavior including social impairments, difficulty in communication, and restrictive patterns of behavior.

Flying Car Gets Green Light From Feds Flying car company Terrafugia, whose website conveniently includes a pronunciation guide (say it with me: “Terra-FOO-gee-ah”), has announced that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has granted the company specific exceptions regarding their Transition vehicle. The Transition aims to fulfill the dream that we’ve been promised since the earliest days of prognostication: The flying car. Unlike other projects like the Skycar, the Transition is meant to function as both a street-legal car and a light aircraft. The idea is that you could drive it from your home, right onto the airfield, and take off. But to balance the requirements of the stresses of flight, the Transition needed heavy duty tires and a heavy-duty polycarbonate windscreen.

Ohio State University Marching Band Performs Tribute To Video Games During Buckeyes Halftime During halftime at the Oct. 6 Ohio State University football game against Nebraska, the Buckeyes' marching band upped the ante on on-field spectacle with a tribute to classic video games, once again demonstrating why they're called "TBDBITL," or "The Best Damn Band In The Land." Accompanied by brassy performances of musical themes from "Pac-Man" and "The Legend of Zelda" to "Halo," the band showed off some pretty fancy choreographed footwork, animating characters with their ever-shifting formation. And of course, even though it was a Nebraska game, the band had to throw in a dig at Michigan. The band lowered their rival's flag down the "pole" during a recreation of the iconic scene from "Super Mario Brothers." The video was posted to YouTube on Oct. 7 by user "handmrow gobucks," who has also recorded past halftime performances by the band, including a space-themed show from September entitled "To Boldly Go."

How the Brain Stops Time One of the strangest side-effects of intense fear is time dilation, the apparent slowing-down of time. It's a common trope in movies and TV shows, like the memorable scene from The Matrix in which time slows down so dramatically that bullets fired at the hero seem to move at a walking pace. In real life, our perceptions aren't keyed up quite that dramatically, but survivors of life-and-death situations often report that things seem to take longer to happen, objects fall more slowly, and they're capable of complex thoughts in what would normally be the blink of an eye. Now a research team from Israel reports that not only does time slow down, but that it slows down more for some than for others. Anxious people, they found, experience greater time dilation in response to the same threat stimuli.

Brain Wave Entrainment and Hypnosis During hypnosis the brain shows a characteristic sequence of brain wave activity. This can now be artificially reproduced through the use of audio tones; a process known as brain wave entrainment. If you are in a particular state, for example, very anxious, then you will produce a unique 'signature' of brainwaves. This applies equally to other states, such as learning and the focused concentration of competitive sport. These are states that can take a long time and a lot of physical effort to attain. Chapter 12: Attention and Consciousness Attention involves top-down (voluntary) goal-directed processes and bottom-up (reflexive), stimulus-driven mechanisms. They influence the way information is processed in the brain and can occur early during sensory processing. Balint's syndrome is a visual attention and awareness deficit. Someone who has this syndrome can only perceive one object at a time. Theoretical Models of AttentionAttention is defined as the ability to attend to somethings while ignoring others. There are three principle goals:To understand how attention enables and influences the detection, perception and encoding of stimulus events as well as the generation of actions based on the stimuli.To describe the computational processes and mechanisms that enable these effects.To uncover how these mechanisms are implemented in the brain's neuronal circuits and neural systems.

Comcast Is Bringing Skype to TV Soon you might be heading to the television to take a call instead of the phone. Comcast has partnered with Skype, a video-calling service that was recently purchased by Microsoft, to offer the service for TVs sometime next year. Subscribers who rent a video kit from Comcast will be able to use their TVs to make and receive calls from other Skype users — regardless of whether those people are also using a TV for the call. The kit will also come with a remote that has a keyboard to allow chat. Although Skype-enabled TVs have been available since last year, this is the first time that Skype will be available to Comcast subscribers regardless of which TV they own.

8 math talks to blow your mind Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways?

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