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Ink - Quotes about writing by writers presented by The Fontayne Group Writing "I put a piece of paper under my pillow, and when I could not sleep I wrote in the dark." Henry David Thoreau "Writing is an adventure." Winston Churchill "Know something, sugar? Stories only happen to people who can tell them." Allan Gurganus "... only he is an emancipated thinker who is not afraid to write foolish things." Anton Chekhov "A poet is someone who stands outside in the rain hoping to be struck by lightening." Less Empathy Toward Outsiders: Brain Differences Reinforce Preferences For Those In Same Social Group An observer feels more empathy for someone in pain when that person is in the same social group, according to new research in the July 1 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study shows that perceiving others in pain activates a part of the brain associated with empathy and emotion more if the observer and the observed are the same race. The findings may show that unconscious prejudices against outside groups exist at a basic level. The study confirms an in-group bias in empathic feelings, something that has long been known but never before confirmed by neuroimaging technology. Researchers have explored group bias since the 1950s.

How to Trick Your Brain for Happiness This month, we feature videos of a Greater Good presentation by Rick Hanson, the best-selling author and trailblazing psychologist. In this excerpt from his talk, Dr. Hanson explains how we can take advantage of the brain’s natural “plasticity”—it’s ability to change shape over time. 12.08.2010 - Our brains are wired so we can better hear ourselves speak, new study shows Like the mute button on the TV remote control, our brains filter out unwanted noise so we can focus on what we’re listening to. But when it comes to following our own speech, a new brain study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that instead of one homogenous mute button, we have a network of volume settings that can selectively silence and amplify the sounds we make and hear. Activity in the auditory cortex when we speak and listen is amplified in some regions of the brain and muted in others. In this image, the black line represents muting activity when we speak. (Courtesy of Adeen Flinker)

Tautology of the day Tautology of the day I just recently bought a new CD case. Here it is: The manufacturers helpfully describe its key feature on the packaging: Author quote posters Being around a successful author would surely be exhausting and inspiring in equal amounts. As well as all that wisdom they put into their books, their thought-provoking one-liners would literally be falling out here, there and everywhere. So while you'd beat yourself up for not possessing even a smidgen of that kind of talent, you'd also be maniacally scribbling it all down for dinner party quoting. The rather smart Evan Robertson has created a set of posters that combine iconic author quotes with genius design work. If you don't want at least two of these hanging on your wall then we need to have a serious chat. Tags: books, Design, Posters

Letter-Color Synaesthesia For as long as I can remember, I've had this implicit sense of a relationship between letters and colors. To me, every letter seems to have a color of its own. When I think of a word, I am aware of its color and the color of its component letters. Spread Some Random Happiness Daily affirmations and inspirational messages may look cheesy but they work. Ironically, the first things we forget are the most vital for our happiness, like the love we have for our friends or the beautiful day that is outside. It's great to be caught off guard and have your daily monotony jumbled up by an unexpected smile, a good word or a kind gesture.

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