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BrainSCANr

BrainSCANr
The goal of neuroscience is to discover the relationships between brain, behavior, and disease. Using the Brain Systems, Connections, Associations, and Network Relationships (brainSCANr) engine, you can explore the relationships between neuroscience terms in peer reviewed publications. Who Are We? We are Bradley Voytek (blog, twitter, CV), PhD and Jessica Bolger Voytek, a husband and wife team who thought it would be fun to combine our interests. Bradley has a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California, Berkeley, and is currently researching the brain networks and underlying physiology mediating cognition. Jessica has a Masters in Information Management and Systems, and is working as a User Interface Developer for a and (separately) as an entrepreneur developing the future of kids' science education.

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The Dark Side of Oxytocin, the Hormone of Love - Ethnocentrism Yes, you knew there had to be a catch. As oxytocin comes into sharper focus, its social radius of action turns out to have definite limits. The love and trust it promotes are not toward the world in general, just toward a person’s in-group. Oxytocin turns out to be the hormone of the clan, not of universal brotherhood. Maslow Self Actualization - unlearn. "Self Actualization is the intrinsic growth of what is already in the organism, or more accurately, of what the organism is." Abraham Maslow Maslow studied healthy people, most psychologists study sick people. The characteristics listed here are the results of 20 years of study of people who had the "full use and exploitation of talents, capacities, potentialities, etc.." Self-actualization implies the attainment of the basic needs of physiological, safety/security, love/belongingness, and self-esteem. Maslow's Basic Principles:

Has the brain-zap backlash begun? - health - 28 November 2014 Stimulating the brain with electricity improves working memory, mental maths, focused attention, creativity and could help treat depression. You can even buy DIY kits online. That's the good news. The bad news is that the most recent investigation has found it has almost no measurable effect on the brain. It's a conclusion that is likely to be controversial. How the Brain Stops Time One of the strangest side-effects of intense fear is time dilation, the apparent slowing-down of time. It's a common trope in movies and TV shows, like the memorable scene from The Matrix in which time slows down so dramatically that bullets fired at the hero seem to move at a walking pace. In real life, our perceptions aren't keyed up quite that dramatically, but survivors of life-and-death situations often report that things seem to take longer to happen, objects fall more slowly, and they're capable of complex thoughts in what would normally be the blink of an eye. Now a research team from Israel reports that not only does time slow down, but that it slows down more for some than for others. Anxious people, they found, experience greater time dilation in response to the same threat stimuli. An intriguing result, and one that raises a more fundamental question: how, exactly, does the brain carry out this remarkable feat?

folder - Neuropsicologia hoje Files Photo Music Books Video Games Sign Up Log In Forgot password? Fuzzy Systems - A Tutorial by James F. Brule' (c) Copyright James F. Brule' 1985. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the copyright notice and the title and date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the author. Blood protein rejuvenates brain and muscle in old mice - health - 04 May 2014 A protein in blood can repair age-related damage in the brains and muscles of old mice, returning them to a more youthful state. Last year, the protein, called growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), was found to have a restorative effect on mouse hearts. If it does a similar job in humans, it could have huge potential for treating a wide-range of age-related diseases, say the researchers behind the latest work. The idea that an infusion of young blood could regenerate ageing bodies was explored several years ago when the circulatory systems of old mice were physically connected to those of young animals, as if they were conjoined twins. This rejuvenated the stem cells in the bone marrow of the older mice that replenish their blood, and led to a wave of studies comparing the blood of old and young mice to try and identify the youth-giving substance.

Neuromarketing Neuromarketing is a new field of marketing research that studies consumers' sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective response to marketing stimuli. Researchers use technologies such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure changes in activity in parts of the brain, electroencephalography (EEG) and Steady state topography (SST) to measure activity in specific regional spectra of the brain response, and/or sensors to measure changes in one's physiological state, also known as biometrics, including (heart rate and respiratory rate, galvanic skin response) to learn why consumers make the decisions they do, and what part of the brain is telling them to do it. Neuromarketing research raised interest for both academic and business side. In fact, certain companies, particularly those with large-scale goals, have invested in their own laboratories, science personnel and / or partnerships with academia. [1] The word "neuromarketing" was coined by Ale Smidts in 2002.[3]

Brain rhythm predicts ability to sleep through a noisy night Ever wonder why some people can sleep through just about anything, while others get startled awake at each and every bump in the night? People who have trouble sleeping in noisy environments often resort to strategies like earplugs or noise-cancelling headphones that muffle the sound, but a new study from investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may lead to ways to block disturbing sounds within the brain. In their report in the August 10 issue of Current Biology, the team reports finding a brain-wave pattern, reflecting activity of a key structure, that predicts the ease at which sleep can be disrupted by noise.

How to Trick Your Brain for Happiness This month, we feature videos of a Greater Good presentation by Rick Hanson, the best-selling author and trailblazing psychologist. In this excerpt from his talk, Dr. Hanson explains how we can take advantage of the brain’s natural “plasticity”—it’s ability to change shape over time. gobyg There’s this great line by Ani Tenzin Palmo, an English woman who spent 12 years in a cave in Tibet: “We do not know what a thought is, yet we’re thinking them all the time.” Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease – What’s The Link? Diabetes mellitus is an emerging global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. This systemic disease affects the blood sugar level causing far-reaching consequences for the human body. Diabetes affects the blood vessels and nerves of the body and causes long-term complications. During the early stages of disease, the damage caused by the high blood sugar level is not very obvious but after several years of poorly controlled diabetes, every organ of the body starts to show the signs and symptoms of disease-related deterioration.

Neuroscientists reveal magicians' secrets - Technology & science - Science - LiveScience NEW YORK — There is a place for magic in science. Five years ago, on a trip to Las Vegas, neuroscientists Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde realized that a partnership was in order with a profession that has an older and more intuitive understanding of how the human brain works. Magicians, it seems, have an advantage over neuroscientists. "Scientists have only studied cognitive illusions for a few decades. Magicians have studied them for hundreds, if not thousands, of years," Martinez-Conde told the audience during a recent presentation here at the New York Academy of Sciences. [ Video: Your Brain on Magic ]

The Secrets of Happiness Forget about money. Don't fret about youth. Acting happy is likely to make you happy. There are happy people. Researchers at the National Institute on Aging found that well-being is strongly influenced by enduring characteristics of the individual. In a 10-year study, they found that, regardless of whether their marital status, job, or residence had changed, people with a happy disposition in 1973 were still happy in 1983.

Total recall: The science behind it Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). Their research has identified a molecule that puts a brake on brain processing and when removed, brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer's disease. "Previous research has shown that production of new molecules is necessary for storing memories in the brain; if you block the production of these molecules, new memory formation does not take place," says RI-MUHC neuroscientist, Dr.

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