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Beau Lotto: Optical illusions show how we see

Beau Lotto: Optical illusions show how we see

http://www.ted.com/talks/beau_lotto_optical_illusions_show_how_we_see.html

Related:  VisionCognitive PsychologyCognitive ScienceNeuroscienceFilm Studies

Implicit memory Evidence and current research[edit] Advanced studies of implicit memory began only a few decades ago. Many of these studies focus on the effect of implicit memory known as priming.[1] Several studies have been performed that confirm the existence of a separate entity which is implicit memory. In one such experiment, participants were asked to listen to several songs and decide if they were familiar with the song or not. Half of the participants were presented with familiar American folk songs and the other half were presented with songs made using the tunes of the same songs from group 1 but mixed with new lyrics. Results show that participants in group 1 had a much higher chance of recalling the songs as being familiar, even though in both groups, the tunes of the songs were the same.[5] This study shows that people are even implicitly making connections amongst their memories.

Brain Scanner Records Dreams on Video Just a few weeks ago, we posted about how brain patterns can reveal almost exactly what you're thinking. Now, researchers at UC Berkeley have figured out how to extract what you're picturing inside your head, and they can play it back on video. The way this works is very similar to the mind-reading technique that we covered earlier this month. A functional MRI (fMRI) machine watches the patterns that appear in people's brains as they watch a movie, and then correlates those patterns with the image on the screen. With these data, a complex computer model was created to predict the relationships between a given brain pattern and a given image, and a huge database was created that matched 18,000,000 seconds worth of random YouTube videos to possible brain patterns. Comparing the brain-scan video to the original video is just a way to prove that the system works, but there's nothing stopping this technique from being used to suck video out of people's heads directly.

Clearing the Mind: How the Brain Cuts the Clutter Newly discovered neurons in the front of the brain act as the bouncers at the doors of the senses, letting in only the most important of the trillions of signals our bodies receive. Problems with these neurons could be the source of some symptoms of diseases like attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia. "The brain doesn't have enough capacity to process all the information that is coming into your senses," said study researcher Julio Martinez-Trujillo, of McGill University in Montreal. "We found that there are some cells, some neurons in the prefrontal cortex, which have the ability to suppress the information that you aren't interested in.

Film Studies: PLEASE START HERE: Welcome to the Course The text that follows, as well as all of the other existing text and activities in this Moodle course, are the result of a course that Dr. Deneka MacDonald ran in March 2005 for the University of Southern Denmark. The student contributions that are presented here have been anonymised with their permission to protect privacy. You will encounter bold text throughout many of the resources and activities in this Module which has been added as emphasis for your benefit during the demonstration process. Welcome to Out of the Digital Dungeon: Exploring Technology and Gender in SciFi, Horror and Fantasy. You will all be aware that this course is offered almost entirely online.

Dunning–Kruger effect The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which low-ability individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability as much higher than it really is. Psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger attributed this bias to a metacognitive incapacity, on the part of those with low ability, to recognize their ineptitude and evaluate their competence accurately. Their research also suggests corollaries: high-ability individuals may underestimate their relative competence and may erroneously assume that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.[1] Dunning and Kruger have postulated that the effect is the result of internal illusion in those of low ability and external misperception in those of high ability: "The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others."[1]

Auditory illusion? Shortly I came across an mp3, titled the “Virtual Hair cut”, and believe me I was bewitched by the level of hearing illusion. By the time I finished the mp3, I got hold of my hair to assure that they are ‘there’ and It was just an illusion!! So highly recommended, download and play it with the Headphones on!! (Headphones are a must). Virtual Haircut

The Neurocritic: The Dark Side of Diagnosis by Brain Scan Daniel Amen: Pioneer or profiteer?: Psychiatrist Daniel Amen uses brain scans to diagnose mental illness. Most peers say that’s bonkers. Right on the heels of a Molecular Psychiatry paper that asked, "Why has it taken so long for biological psychiatry to develop clinical tests and what to do about it?" (Kapur et al., 2012) comes this provocatively titled article in the Washington Post about neurohuckster Dr. Julie Dash Julie Dash (born October 22, 1952) is an American filmmaker, author and member of the L.A. Rebellion. Her Daughters of the Dust (1992) was the first full-length film by an African-American woman with general theatrical release in the United States. Dash is the film's producer, screenwriter and director. In 2004, Daughters of the Dust was included in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. One of a generation of African and African-American filmmakers from the UCLA Film School who have created an alternative to Hollywood films, Dash has also made numerous music videos and television movies, the latter including Funny Valentines (1999), Incognito (1999), Love Song (2000), and The Rosa Parks Story (2002).

Forer effect A related and more general phenomenon is that of subjective validation.[1] Subjective validation occurs when two unrelated or even random events are perceived to be related because a belief, expectation, or hypothesis demands a relationship. Thus people seek a correspondence between their perception of their personality and the contents of a horoscope. Forer's demonstration[edit] Mind-Reading Computer Takes Images Straight out of Your Brain Japanese scientists at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Labs have successfully built a machine that can read your mind - or at least getting images straight from your brain: A Japanese research team has revealed it had created a technology that could eventually display on a computer screen what people have on their minds, such as dreams.Researchers at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories succeeded in processing and displaying images directly from the human brain, they said in a study unveiled ahead of publication in the US magazine Neuron.While the team for now has managed to reproduce only simple images from the brain, they said the technology could eventually be used to figure out dreams and other secrets inside people's minds. Link | Article at Pink Tentacle - via Gizmodo

Memory Scientists Say: All Is Not Forgotten Unless you are this woman, you probably have a long mental list of moments and facts you wish you could remember -- but for the life of you, you can't. To use a personal example, I periodically Google the words "yellow house Berlin," hoping to produce the name of that one hostel I lived in for a summer in college; alas, no success yet. The good news, though, is that while such memories may be currently inaccessible, they're not entirely gone, and could theoretically be retrieved, according to new brain imaging research from the University of California, Irvine. In the study, neurobiologist Jeffrey Johnson (along with a few colleagues) ran 16 college participants through an fMRI machine (which measures neural activity via blood flow) to compare brain patterns during memory formation and recall. Using what is called "pattern analysis," it's possible to attach a unique pattern of brain activity to every individual thing we do.

Beau Lotto uses optical illusions to demonstrate how our brain uses context to decode visual signals. by kaspervandenberg Jan 12

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