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1107.5728v2.pdf (application/pdf Object)

1107.5728v2.pdf (application/pdf Object)

http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/1107/1107.5728v2.pdf

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Unfit for Work: The startling rise of disability in America By Chana Joffe-Walt In the past three decades, the number of Americans who are on disability has skyrocketed. The rise has come even as medical advances have allowed many more people to remain on the job, and new laws have banned workplace discrimination against the disabled. Every month, 14 million people now get a disability check from the government. The federal government spends more money each year on cash payments for disabled former workers than it spends on food stamps and welfare combined. the capitalist network that runs the world - physics-math - 19 October 2011 AS PROTESTS against financial power sweep the world this week, science may have confirmed the protesters' worst fears. An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy. The study's assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable. The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York's Occupy Wall Street movement and protesters elsewhere (see photo).

the capitalist network that runs the world - physics-math - 19 October 2011 AS PROTESTS against financial power sweep the world this week, science may have confirmed the protesters' worst fears. An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy. The study's assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable. The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York's Occupy Wall Street movement and protesters elsewhere (see photo). But the study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power.

Socialist Workers Party (United States) The Socialist Workers Party is a far-left political organization in the United States. The group places a priority on "solidarity work" to aid strikes and is strongly supportive of Cuba. The SWP publishes The Militant, a weekly newspaper that dates back to 1928, and maintains Pathfinder Press. The Socialist Workers Party traces its origins back to the former Communist League of America (CLA), founded in 1928 by members of the Communist Party USA expelled for supporting Russian Communist leader Leon Trotsky against Joseph Stalin. Oligarchy, American Style Anyone who has tracked this issue over time knows what I mean. Whenever growing income disparities threaten to come into focus, a reliable set of defenders tries to bring back the blur. Think tanks put out reports claiming that inequality isn’t really rising, or that it doesn’t matter.

Global Power Project, Part 1: Exposing the Transnational Capitalist Class A giant mansion right below the Chapel of the Rocks in Sedona, Arizona. (Photo: Adam Gessaman / Flickr)The Global Power Project, an investigative series produced by Occupy.com, aims to identify and connect the worldwide institutions and individuals who comprise today's global power oligarchy. By studying the relationships and varying levels of leadership that govern our planet's most influential institutions — from banks, corporations and financial institutions to think tanks, foundations and universities — this project seeks to expose the complex, highly integrated network of influence wielded by relatively few individuals on a national and transnational basis. This is not a study of wealth, but a study of power. Many now know the rhetoric of the 1% very well: the imagery of a small elite owning most of the wealth while the 99% take the table scraps.

Are There Too Many Ph.D.s And Not Enough Jobs? Our country needs more people with science, math and engineering degrees — at least, that's the common refrain among politicians and educators. American students lag behind the rest of the world when it comes to math and science test scores, and the president and others have called for a change in immigration laws that would make it easier for people who come to the U.S. to get technical degrees to stay in the country permanently. The number of PhD students who had a job by graduation has been going down, while the numbers of those who didn't or those who were continuing with studies is going up. But job numbers released by the National Science Foundation show that people with doctoral degrees in those technical fields are struggling to find work in their industries. Jordan Weissmann, an editor at The Atlantic, analyzed the latest NSF figures. These figures are not surprising to many young scientists and engineers who feel the employment squeeze.

When markets fail A repeating narrative during this crisis is that fiscal austerity is required in order to satisfy the “markets”, that amorphous collective of bond traders, gamblers, speculators, crooks and whatever else. The regular threats coming from the ratings agencies (those crooks who lied to investors in order to make profits via cosy deals with the originators of the “assets”) reinforce the idea that markets are the “regulators” of good judgement. Economics students are taught that one of the imperatives of government is to deregulate in order to allow the market signals to be clear and strong so we can act in accordance with the “markets” judgement of prudence.

Who Runs The World? Solid Proof That a Core Group Of Wealthy Elites Is Pulling the Strings By Michael SnyderActivist Post Does a shadowy group of obscenely wealthy elitists control the world? Do men and women with enormous amounts of money really run the world from behind the scenes? The answer might surprise you. Most of us tend to think of money as a convenient way to conduct transactions, but the truth is that it also represents power and control. And today we live in a neo-feudalist system in which the super-rich pull all the strings.

Famous Economists - List & Biographies of World Famous Economists An economist is a person who has studied and is well versed with the policies and practices in the field of economics. Not only are these people well versed with the intricacies of economics but are also the very people who create, propose and even implement certain policies that are designed to better serve they work for. The sectors where they are found generally include the private sector and the public sector or the government sector. While most colleges offer courses in the study of economics, which can take up to 6 years to complete, there have been instances where some of the most notable economists come for backgrounds that may vary from mathematics to sociology and even history. The field of economics even has Nobel Prize associated with it.

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