background preloader

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion
Related:  zero growth - population and sustainable economics

Exponential Economist Meets Finite Physicist [slimstat f='count' w='ip' lf='resource contains economist'] views this month; [slimstat f='count' w='ip' lf='strtotime equals 2011-07-01|interval equals -1'] overall Some while back, I found myself sitting next to an accomplished economics professor at a dinner event. Shortly after pleasantries, I said to him, “economic growth cannot continue indefinitely,” just to see where things would go. Cast of characters: Physicist, played by me; Economist, played by an established economics professor from a prestigious institution. Note: because I have a better retention of my own thoughts than those of my conversational companion, this recreation is lopsided to represent my own points/words. Act One: Bread and Butter Physicist: Hi, I’m Tom. Economist: Hi Tom, I’m [ahem..cough]. Physicist: Hey, that’s great. Economist: [chokes on bread crumb] Did I hear you right? Physicist: That’s right. Economist: Well sure, nothing truly lasts forever. Economist: I would guess a few percent. Total U.S.

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff If your selected country was not represented by a population pyramid in the lesson, you may wonder what it looks like. The U.S. Census Bureau has an International Data Base that can help you create one. Is your country a fast, slow or no growth pyramid? Visualizing World Birth and Death Rates Initializing... Loading data... Loaded country birth rates... Loaded country lat/long... Loaded world geometry... Loaded country death rates... Loaded country populations... Loaded country names... All data loaded... Initializing structures... Syncing country data ... Setting up maps ... Initialization complete... Afghanistan Åland Islands Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Plurinational State of Bolivia Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo The Democratic Republic of the Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic

Book Bytes - 109: Getting the Market to Tell the Truth April 11, 2012 Getting the Market to Tell the Truth Lester R. Brown Moving the global economy off its current decline-and-collapse path depends on reaching four goals: stabilizing climate, stabilizing population, eradicating poverty, and restoring the economy’s natural support systems. The key to restructuring the economy is to get the market to tell the truth through full-cost pricing. For energy specifically, full-cost pricing means putting a tax on carbon to reflect the full cost of burning fossil fuels and offsetting it with a reduction in the tax on income. The failure of the market to reflect total costs can readily be seen with gasoline. If we can get the market to tell the truth, to have market prices that reflect the full cost of burning gasoline or coal, of deforestation, of overpumping aquifers, and of overfishing, then we can begin to create a rational economy. If we leave costs off the books, we risk bankruptcy. Or consider deforestation.

Human Development Reports | United Nations Development Programme How Did We Get to 7 Billion People So Fast? I love the cool infographic video from NPR. 7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? is a video that uses colored liquids to visualize the population rates of the differen continents. High birth rates mean fast liquid pouring in, slower death rates slow down the liquid dripping out of the bottom. The U.N. estimates that the world’s population will pass the 7 billion mark on Monday. Found on FlowingData

Hooked on Growth » Population Growth Most advocates of sustainable population levels believe reducing population is just part of the work needed to bring our civilization into sustainable equilibrium. For the wealthiest populations, reducing consumption, contracting our economies (degrowth), and eventually reaching a steady state economy are also essential. World population reached 7 billion in 2011. It also depends on whether the developing world follows in our mistaken footsteps or takes a more direct route to a sustainable way of life. It is true the rate of population increase is slowing, but there is no guarantee that will continue, particularly if projections cause us to relax and discontinue efforts to educate the public about sustainable population, provide access to contraception, and increase gender equity and opportunity. Additionally, today many cities, states, territories and nations welcome and even pursue population growth. Please e-mail dave[at]@growthbusters.orgtosuggestadditionstothislist. Global National

Human Numbers Through Time By Susan K. Lewis Posted 04.20.04 NOVA For most of human existence our ancestors led precarious lives as scavengers, hunters, and gatherers, and there were fewer than 10 million human beings on Earth at any one time. Today, many cities have more than 10 million inhabitants each, and populations continue to skyrocket. Trace the dramatic growth of human populations over recent centuries on our global map, and see where on Earth as many as three billion more people may live by 2050. Note on Graphics The global map was adapted from World Population: A Graphic Simulation of the History of Human Population Growth, a 2003 video produced by Population Connection (www.populationconnection.org). When areas become super-populated, as they begin to do in certain parts of the world in the 20th century, the dots merge and spread outward like a stain. Illustrations (all)

Professor Emeritus Al Bartlett - Physics at University of Colorado at Boulder - articles on exponential growth, peak oil and population growth, sustainability, renewable resources and the environment International Programs - Information Gateway Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 1. What is the International Data Base? The International Data Base (IDB) offers a variety of demographic indicators for countries and areas of the world with a population of 5,000 or more. 2. The IDB provides many types of demographic data, including: · Estimates and projections of: Birth, death, and growth rates, migration rates, infant mortality, and life expectancy Fertility rates Total population and population by age and sex 3. The following ZIP file contains the complete data set which has currently been released and is used by the International Data Base tool. 4. The demographic estimates and projections found in the International Data Base are the result of over 30 years of analysis of census, survey, vital statistics, and other data by Census Bureau demographers. 5. The following reports cover fertility, mortality, and migration: 6. (play button). 7. For additional information, please see our Population Estimates and Projections Methodology page. 8.

Steady state economy A steady state economy is an economy of relatively stable size. It features stable population and stable consumption that remain at or below carrying capacity. The term typically refers to a national economy, but it can also be applied to the economic system of a city, a region, or the entire planet. Note that Robert Solow and Trevor Swan applied the term steady state a bit differently in their economic growth model. Their steady state occurs when investment equals depreciation, and the economy reaches equilibrium, which may occur during a period of growth. Physical features[edit] The steady state economy is an entirely physical concept. Economists use gross domestic product or GDP to measure the size of an economy in dollars or some other monetary unit. A steady state economy, therefore, aims for stable or mildly fluctuating levels in population and consumption of energy and materials. Limits to economic growth[edit] History of the concept[edit] and Policies for the transition[edit]

Is Population Growth a Ponzi Scheme? by Joseph Chamie Bernie Madoff’s recent Ponzi scheme has drifted out of the world's headlines. However, there is another even more costly and widespread scheme — “Ponzi Demography” — that warrants everybody's attention. While it may come in many guises, Ponzi demography is essentially a pyramid scheme that attempts to make more money for some by adding on more and more people through population growth. While more visible in industrialized economies, particularly in Australia, Canada and the United States, Ponzi demography also operates in developing countries. The underlying strategy of Ponzi demography is to privatize the profits and socialize the costs incurred from increased population growth. The basic pitch of those promoting Ponzi demography is straightforward and intoxicating in its pro-population growth appeal: "more is better." Among its primary tactics, Ponzi demography exploits the fear of population decline and aging.

Related: