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1930s VS current crisis / Années 30 VS crise actuelle

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A propos de Philippe Corcuff, « Les années 30 reviennent et la gauche est dans le brouillard », Textuel 2014. Les années 30 reviennent-elles vraiment ?

A propos de Philippe Corcuff, « Les années 30 reviennent et la gauche est dans le brouillard », Textuel 2014

Chômage de masse, « crise économique », montée des nationalismes ou du moins de l’appel à l’unité de la nation, prenant par exemple la forme d’une critique de l’Europe, croissance des tensions entre « minorités visibles », recrudescence d’actes antisémites, popularité surprenante de sites web tels que celui d’Alain Soral [1] etc. le sociologue Philippe Corcuff publie aux Editions Textuel un livre qui tente une analyse de la période actuelle et cherche à questionner le rapprochement qui est souvent fait avec les années 30. L’ouvrage se stucture en cinq grandes parties. Dans la première l’auteur se plonge dans quelques travaux historiques sur les années 30 et s’interroge sur la validité de l’analogie avec l’époque contemporaine. Sont interrogés notamment Gérard Noiriel, Jean-Louis Loubet del Bayle, Pierre Laborie, Philippe Burrin et Pierre Bourdieu.

Quels sont les chemins pour « combattre le FN » ? Mais il y a un second problème. Années 30, le remake ? Finkielkraut et Bouvet répondent à Corcuff. "Crise actuelle, crise des années 30 : quels parallèles?" The World Economy Looks a Bit Like It's the 1930s. Pourquoi les années 1930 ne permettent pas de comprendre le présent. Atlantico : Historiquement, les années 30 peuvent-elles éclairer notre compréhension des crises du présent ?

Pourquoi les années 1930 ne permettent pas de comprendre le présent

Serge Berstein : C’est une illusion de croire que le passé fournit des leçons sur le présent. Lessons of the 1930s: There could be trouble ahead. “YOU'RE right, we did it,” Ben Bernanke told Milton Friedman in a speech celebrating the Nobel laureate's 90th birthday in 2002.

Lessons of the 1930s: There could be trouble ahead

He was referring to Mr Friedman's conclusion that central bankers were responsible for much of the suffering in the Depression. “But thanks to you,” the future chairman of the Federal Reserve continued, “we won't do it again.” Nine years later Mr Bernanke's peers are congratulating themselves for delivering on that promise. “We prevented a Great Depression,” the Bank of England's governor, Mervyn King, told the Daily Telegraph in March this year. The shock that hit the world economy in 2008 was on a par with that which launched the Depression. Debate continues as to what made the Depression so long and deep. A more common view among economists, however, is that the simultaneous tightening of fiscal and monetary policy turned a tough situation into an awful one. Look closer, however, and the picture is less comforting. Riding for a fall America is not alone. Is Europe returning to the political extremism of the 1930s? — Debating Europe.

‘Godwin’s law’ states that as an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazi Germany approaches 1.

Is Europe returning to the political extremism of the 1930s? — Debating Europe

There are, however, some important corollaries to this “law” of the internet, and not all comparisons with totalitarianism trivialise the past. And while it is important not to see parallels with the rise of fascism everywhere, it is also equally important to understand the past, and not to see Nazi Germany as a singularly unique and wholly unrepeatable phenomenon. After all, those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. We had a comment sent in from Jovan, concerned that there were “parallels today with the 1930s, in how economic failure and widening inequality led to extremist fringes rising to the mainstream.” Certainly, the centre-ground in European politics is a lonely place to be today. It’s easy to get carried away. We also had a comment from Eion, who thinks the threat from extremist parties is overstated. Europe’s fear of Muslim refugees echoes rhetoric of 1930s anti-Semitism.

A migrant shouts next to Macedonian policemen as she waits to cross the borders from northern Greece to southern Macedonia, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015.

Europe’s fear of Muslim refugees echoes rhetoric of 1930s anti-Semitism

(AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos) A humanitarian crisis of historic proportions has been growing in Europe, as hundreds of thousands of refugees and economic migrants from the Middle East, Africa and parts of Asia have crossed the continent's borders this year alone. The scale of the influx is now well-documented. According to the European Union's border agency, some 340,000 migrants crossed its borders in first seven months of 2015; in July, the figure was on its own an astonishing 107,500 people.

The majority of those making the hazardous crossing across the eastern Mediterranean are Syrian refugees, displaced by a horrifying, grinding civil war that has forced roughly half of the country's population out of their homes. According to U.N. figures, the current global levels of displacement have not been matched since World War II. Protectionism: Is it on the way back? As the global economy continues to face tough times, governments are increasingly playing politics with trade and giving in to protectionism.

Protectionism: Is it on the way back?

The first world war: Look back with angst. Trump élu, UE explosée, euro en vrac, aggravation de la crise des migrants et terrorisme tous azimuts : comment 2017 pourrait nous plonger dans un monde totalement nouveau (et très désagréable…)