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John Hattie & His High Impact Strategies

John Hattie & His High Impact Strategies
John Hattie synthesized over 500,000+ studies related to student achievement in his book Visible Learning. He showed that teachers can make a difference despite other circumstances that may impede learning. In fact, Hattie found that most teachers have some degree of impact on their students’ learning. However, some teachers have far more impact than others. What Should Teachers Do? John Hattie discovered that teachers are far more likely to have a large and positive impact if they: Are passionate about helping their students learnForge strong relationships with their studentsAre clear about what they want their students to learnAdopt evidence-based teaching strategiesMonitor their impact on students’ learning, and adjust their approaches accordinglyActively seek to improve their own teachingAre viewed by the students as being credible (Hattie 2016 Update) You are far more likely to have a low (or even negative) impact if you: Hattie’s Top 10 Teaching Strategies Curriculum Matters Too

http://www.evidencebasedteaching.org.au/hattie-his-high-impact-strategies/

Related:  Growth MindsetLinksVili's collectionHattieTeaching & Learning

Knowledge about how the brain works can make a big difference when confronting difficult learning situations. If you have a growth mindset and are aware of the ability to improve oneself, a challenge can be welcome (versus those with a fixed mindset who are averse to the failures a challenge may bring). Stanford University professor of psychology Carol Dweck, who has been leading the research in this field, discusses “The power of believing that you can improve” in this TED talk. In one example, she talks about students who made vast improvements on test scores once they learned about the growth mindset: “This happened because the meaning of effort and difficulty were transformed. Why our children are so bored at school, cannot wait, get easily frustrated and have no real friends? — Victoria Prooday - Occupational Therapist “My son doesn’t like vegetables.” “She doesn’t like going to bed early.” “He doesn’t like to eat breakfast.” “She doesn’t like toys, but she is very good at her iPad” “He doesn’t want to get dressed on his own.” “She is too lazy to eat on her own.”

Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps Educators and students are quickly becoming more comfortable with classroom technology, allowing them to shift from thinking about the technical side of integrating a new tool to focusing on how it improves learning. While the sheer number of education apps is still overwhelming, increasingly teachers have found what works for them and are sticking to them. “The conversations I had were radically different than they were a year ago,” said Michelle Luhtala, the librarian for New Canaan High School and host of an Emerging Tech webinar on edWeb. She tapped her professional learning network of educators, teaching all grades and located all over the country, to share their favorite tech tools. “A year ago people felt like it was this new thing that was so overwhelming,” Luhtala said, “and now it really seems much more comfortable.” Educators have become proficient with their favorite classroom apps and are getting more creative with using them to achieve teaching goals.

What Do Schools Need? Collaboration and Principals Who Lead It  John Hattie is back -- and once again he is marshaling the evidence needed to improve schools. Keep in mind that Hattie took the education world by storm a few years ago with his book Visible Learning: What Works Best for Learning. Visible Learning and its sister book, Visible Learning for Teachers, began to solve a knotty problem. To wit, thousands upon thousands of education research studies -- some high-quality, some low-quality, some large-scale, some tiny -- confuse just about everyone. Individual teachers and principals have no practical way to sift through all of them on their own, which leaves educators vulnerable to fads and fashions -- in part because no matter how unrealistic the idea, some study somewhere can be used to validate it. When aggregated together, however, all those studies provide important guidance.

Taking Notes By Hand May Be Better Than Digitally, Researchers Say Laptops are common in lecture halls worldwide. Students hear a lecture at the Johann Wolfang Goethe-University on Oct. 13, 2014, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort – rather than being a fixed trait they’re just born with – is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential. The new research involves larger, more rigorous field trials that provide some of the first evidence that the social psychology strategy can be effective when implemented in schools on a wide scale.

14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools Saying that it has always been this way, doesn’t count as a legitimate justification to why it should stay that way. Teacher and administrators all over the world are doing amazing things, but some of the things we are still doing, despite all the new solutions, research and ideas out there is, to put it mildly, incredible. I’m not saying we should just make the current system better… we should change it into something else. I have compiled a list of 14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools and it is my hope that this will inspire lively discussions about the future of education. 1. Computer Rooms

7 Tools for Building Review Games This week I received at least a half dozen emails from people who were looking for suggestions for creating review games or practice quizzes for their students. The following are the tools that I suggested in reply to those emails. One teacher's needs are little bit different from another's so this list covers a fairly wide range of options. TinyTap is a good iPad and Android app for creating your own review games based on pictures and diagrams. Hattie: Distractions Pearson’s goal is to help people make progress in their lives through learning. This means we’re always learning too. This series of publications, Open Ideas, is one of the ways in which we do this. We work with some of the best minds in education - from teachers and technologists, to researchers and big thinkers - to bring their independent ideas and insights to a wider audience. How do we learn, and what keeps us motivated to do so?

Bill Rogers Behaviour Management I came across Bill Rogers‘ work on behaviour management early in my career. I started working in some really tough schools. In some ways, it was lucky, because it made the rest of my career less challenging and prepared me for my very first principal’s role in 1995 (teaching principal), at a school with a teacher turnover rate of 400% over the two years prior to my starting. A lot of my success with challenging classes was due to the work of behaviour management guru Bill Rogers – a real teacher with extensive expertise in behaviour management.

leading and learning: Education Readings John Hattie / literacy/ Finland/ Inquiry learning/ and more Sir Ken Robinson By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz This week’s homework! Hattie’s research: Is wrong Part 4 – a kind of Svengali NZ educator Kelvin Smythe’s latest posting in his series that deconstructs John Hattie’s ‘research.’ “I predict the Holy Grail label assigned to his research will, given his personality, prove the death of his reputation pushing him on, to ever extreme expressions of arrogance and wrongness.

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