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A Primer In Heutagogy And Self-Directed Learning

The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy by Terry Heick Jackie Gerstein’s passionate thinking about learning is some of my favorite to read. She is rarely pulled down by trend or fad, but is unquestionably progressive and forward-thinking in her approaches to learning and thinking about learning. Her and I also both share a passion: self-directed learning. I’m embarrassingly interested in any kind of learning at all–formal or informal, self-directed or teacher-centered, authentic or academic. Gerstein’s presentation, “Education 3.0 and the Pedagogy of Mobile Learning” uses the concept of mobile learning as a spearhead into a broader discussion of how people learn–different approaches, different domains, and different technologies. Related Posts

Thinking About Learning Resilience and Grit: Resource Roundup There’s been a lot of talk lately about resilience, grit, growth mindset, and related concepts -- including the social and emotional skills associated with these factors and their importance for student well-being and academic success. Edutopia has curated these lists of resources to help educators and parents follow these topics and create home and school environments that provide supports and opportunities to help young people thrive. Nurturing Resilience The ability to bounce back from adversity is associated with a variety of skills. Learn more about the resilience research and supports and strategies to develop resilience in young people. (10+ Resources) Fostering Grit Explore an array of resources about understanding and building student perseverance, and consider questions raised by the research on grit. (15+ Resources) Teaching Growth Mindset Learning From Failure Managing Stress Responding to Trauma and Tragedy

Accueil Stop, Start, Continue: Conceptual Understanding Meets Applied Problem Solving I recently became the Chief Academic Officer for the International Baccalaureate (IB) after more than two decades of working in and leading IB schools. In IB World Schools, we endeavor to create internationally-minded young people who, recognizing our common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help make a better and more peaceful world. Just prior to taking this position, I led the intense experiential living and learning of a United World College (UWC). Every year we built a community that modeled what all of us wished for in the wider world. What should we stop doing? As simple as these sound, they provided us a safe, predictable set of questions that became habits of mind, a way to pause and reflect before engaging in something else. Humanity cannot wait for students to graduate -- whether or not they are in IB schools -- and get started on doing things that contribute to a better world. How might we help to make that happen? What Should We Stop Doing? Stop rushing.

Pratiques de la formation JaysMasterHandoutfor%20CAIM%202014.pdf Didactique professionnelle | Un cours n'est pas conçu pour celui qui enseigne, mais pour celui qui apprend! The education fad that’s hurting our kids: What you need to know about “Growth Mindset” theory — and the harmful lessons it imparts One of the most popular ideas in education these days can be summarized in a single sentence (a fact that may help to account for its popularity). Here’s the sentence: Kids tend to fare better when they regard intelligence and other abilities not as fixed traits that they either have or lack, but as attributes that can be improved through effort. In a series of monographs over many years and in a book published in 2000, psychologist Carol Dweck used the label “incremental theory” to describe the self-fulfilling belief that one can become smarter. Rebranding it more catchily as the “growth mindset” allowed her to recycle the idea a few years later in a best-selling book for general readers. By now, the growth mindset has approached the status of a cultural meme. Unlike grit — which, as I’ve argued elsewhere, is driven more by conservative ideology than by solid research — Dweck’s basic thesis is supported by decades’ worth of good data. But “how well they did” at what?

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