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RePEc: Research Papers in Economics

RePEc: Research Papers in Economics
General principles RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) is a collaborative effort of hundreds of volunteers in 82 countries to enhance the dissemination of research in Economics and related sciences. The heart of the project is a decentralized bibliographic database of working papers, journal articles, books, books chapters and software components, all maintained by volunteers. The collected data is then used in various services as described below. So far, over 1,600 archives from 81 countries have contributed about 1.4 million research pieces from 1,800 journals and 3,800 working paper series. Over 35,000 authors have registered and 70,000 email subscriptions are served every week.

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I Made A Linguistics Professor Listen To A Blink-182 Song And Analyze The Accent Blink-182 at the Whiskey in Los Angeles in 1996. (Photo: Daniel D'Auria/WikiCommons CC BY-SA 2.0) Two decades have passed since pop-punk exploded in the American music scene, yet the quintessentially suburban, teen-centric music still seems to bounce around our collective skulls. Of all the elements of the Clinton-era mutation of punk music that embraced skate and surf culture, mild angst, goofiness, and incredibly hooky, catchy music, it's the vocals that we remember. The very specific accent used in the mega-hits of the genre seems to still have a hold over anyone who was a teenager between 1993 and 2003: On Twitter you’ll see jokes made about the “pop punk voice" used by bands like the Offspring, New Found Glory, Avril Lavigne, and, especially, Blink-182.

MIT Theses This collection of MIT Theses in DSpace contains selected theses and dissertations from all MIT departments. Please note that this is NOT a complete collection of MIT theses. To search all MIT theses, use Barton, MIT Libraries' catalog. MIT's DSpace contains more than 40,000 theses completed at MIT dating as far back as the mid 1800's. Theses in this collection have been scanned by Document Services or submitted in electronic format by thesis authors.

BASE - Bielefeld Academic Search Engine BASE is one of the world's most voluminous search engines especially for academic open access web resources. BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library. As the open access movement grows and prospers, more and more repository servers come into being which use the "Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting" (OAI-PMH) for providing their contents. BASE collects, normalises, and indexes these data. BASE provides more than 80 million documents from more than 4,000 sources. You can access the full texts of about 60-70% of the indexed documents.

Language Log An important rallying cry and usage distinction made by allies of undocumented workers in the current cultural battle over immigration in the United States is Elie Wiesel's assertion above: "No human being is illegal." In the quote, Wiesel gives examples of the kinds of adjectives that he feels can denote properties of people (fat, skinny, beautiful, right, and wrong). On the other hand, calling a person 'illegal', he says, is a contradiction in terms. Here's a more elaborated statement of the idea, quoted from this website When one refers to an immigrant as an "illegal alien," they are using the term as a noun. They are effectively saying that the individual, as opposed to any actions that the individual has taken, is illegal.

How to Change the Centuries-Old Model of Academic Publishing - Pacific Standard Back when I was a new graduate student, more than a dozen years ago, nearly all scientific journals in my field had a website, but that didn’t mean you could always get the papers you needed online. Often, I had to go to the library with a handful of quarters for the photocopier in order to get the print version of an article that was neither online nor pay-walled. Because this was time consuming, I would only do this for articles I really needed to read.

15 Massive Online Databases You Should Know About Advertisement Think of your favorite open databases. I’m sure Wikipedia and IMDb instantly spring to mind, but you might not be in the need of all that knowledge ever, or a comprehensive database of all things entertainment. Sometimes you need a bit of VLDB (Very Large Data Base) flavor. Something to spice up your data analysis. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Speaker: Linguistic Isolation in the Modern World Chi Luu is a peripatetic linguist who speaks Australian English and studies dead languages. Every two weeks, she’ll uncover curious stories about language from around the globe for Lingua Obscura. A language becomes extinct when its last speaker dies, but some argue that language death really occurs when the second last speaker dies, because for the lone remaining speaker, there is no one left to talk to. The curious story of Ayapaneco, an endangered language from the state of Tabasco in Mexico, sparked worldwide interest when it was reported that the last two speakers of the language were not speaking to each other. What a thought!

The Geography of Profanity - Pacific Standard “Asshole is a wonderful word,” said Mike Pesca in his podcast, the Gist. His former colleagues at NPR had wanted to call someone an asshole, and even though it was for a podcast, not broadcast, and even though the person in question was a certified asshole, the NPR censor said no. Pesca disagreed. Ancient whistle language uses whole brain for long-distance chat Alexander Christie-Miller You could say they sent the first tweets. An ancient whistling language that sounds a little like birdsong has been found to use both sides of the brain – challenging the idea that the left side is all important for communicating. The whistling language is still used by around 10,000 people in the mountains of north-east Turkey, and can carry messages as far as 5 kilometres. Researchers have now shown that this language involves the brain’s right hemisphere, which was already known to be important for understanding music. Until recently, it was thought that the task of interpreting language fell largely to the brain’s left hemisphere.

Required Reading from Journalism Professors Below, six syllabi from journalism professors on what you should be reading. 1. Journalism 494: Pollner Seminar In Narrative Non-Fiction With Esquire’s Chris Jones (University of Montana) “The purpose of this course is to teach students how to write publishable magazine-length narrative non-fiction: In other words, my aim is to help you learn how to write good, long, true stories. The course outline will mirror a typical writer’s progress through the birth of an idea to a finished, polished piece, including reporting, writing, editing, and fact-checking. In addition to classroom discussion, course readings will help students understand the difference between good and bad work.

RePEc: Research Papers in Economics by sirchamallow Sep 6

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