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The Historical Evolution of Europe's Borders

The Historical Evolution of Europe's Borders
The movie "Epic time-lapse map of Europe" fast forwards a map from the year 1000 AD until 2003 to reveal the dynamic nature of Europe's borders, alliances, unions, territories, and occupied lands. An alternative movie takes a bit longer, but contains useful textual annotations such as the actual year that is shown and the events that occurred. The movie was made with "Centennia Historical Atlas" by Centennia Software. Watch the movies below. Via @tillnm.

http://infosthetics.com/archives/2012/05/the_historical_evolution_of_europes_borders.html#extended

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Marvelous Maps and Curious Cartography, Part Three "QUANTUM SHOT" #817 Link - article by Simon Rose and Avi Abrams "I have an existential map. It has 'You are here' written all over it." -- Steven Wright Here’s another look at intriguing and sometimes bizarre maps here at Dark Roasted Blend. You can also check out Unusual and Marvelous Maps and Unusual and Marvelous Maps Part Two. There have been lots of fanciful maps depicting countries as unusual characters. Caricature Map of Europe 1914 The Clanker Powers: Germany is a massive military machine with weapons aimed outwards to all surrounding countries. It points threateningly at Britain, not so much as a sign of direct aggression, but more as an indicator that it was now Germany’s turn to start a grand global Empire to challenge the world’s current one.

Piri Reis map Surviving fragment of the Piri Reis map showing Central and South America shores. In his notes appended to it is written "the map of the western lands drawn by Columbus"[1] The Piri Reis map is a world map compiled in 1513 from military intelligence by the Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis (pronounced [piɾi ɾeis]). Approximately one-third of the map survives; it shows the western coasts of Europe and North Africa and the coast of Brazil with reasonable accuracy. Various Atlantic islands including the Azores and Canary Islands are depicted, as is the mythical island of Antillia and possibly Japan. The historical importance of the map lies in its demonstration of the extent of exploration of the New World by approximately 1510, and in its claim to have used Columbus's maps, otherwise lost, as a source.

How Common Is Your Birthday? UPDATE: I’ve written a clarification about this post here. Please read it. A friend posted an interesting data table on my Facebook wall yesterday, which was my birthday. CERN For the company with the ticker symbol CERN, see Cerner. For the rocket nozzle, see SERN. Coordinates: The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: Organisation européenne pour la recherche nucléaire), known as CERN (/ˈsɜrn/; French pronunciation: ​[sɛʁn]; derived from "Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire"; see History) is a European research organization that operates the largest particle physics laboratory in the world.

G. William Skinner Map Collection Home » G. William Skinner Map Collection G. William Skinner (1925-2008) was the dean of sinological anthropology in the West, and a major theorist of family systems and of spatial social science. He was a pioneer in applying spatial analysis techniques to the study of agrarian societies, China, Japan, and France in particular. It’s a Google Streetmap of history: How our famous landmarks looked up to 170 years ago By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 07:19 GMT, 7 November 2011 A website has taken the notion of the 'Now and Then' photo to another level with their 'Google Streetmap of history' which allows people to see what a British street looked like 10, 20 or even 100 years ago. Like a photographic trip down memory lane, the phone app allows users to 'pin' photos to places on the map meaning you can see how the world has changed since the photo was taken, and read the stories behind the area.

An Interactive Look at Connected Devices in 2020 [INFOGRAPHIC] Whether it’s the Internet of Things and the rising connectivity among devices, or the use of wireless connections for machine-to-machine applications, you might be considering how this technology affects you and your organization. It’s important to know the sharing of valuable data by devices is expected to become an almost $1 trillion industry by 2020 , according to a report by the Carbon War Room. And in the next seven years, we’ll be measuring the growth in connected devices in more than just dollars. The following is a glimpse of what this technology might mean for your business in the future:

Black Death Spread of the Black Death in Europe (1346–53) The Black Death is thought to have originated in the arid plains of central Asia, where it then travelled along the Silk Road, reaching the Crimea by 1343.[6] From there, it was most likely carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. Spreading throughout the Mediterranean and Europe, the Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60% of Europe's total population.[7] In total, the plague reduced the world population from an estimated 450 million down to 350–375 million in the 14th century.

10 Wonders of the World You Don’t Know Our World While most of these wonders will be known to a few people, they are, on the whole, not as well known as the famous “seven wonders”. Despite that, each has a reason for being considered wonderful and deserves its spot on this list. Enjoy the list and be sure to share other lesser-known wonders in the comments.

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